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Corsair CX750M PSU Review

Corsair's CX line is aimed at users with limited budgets who still want a branded, reliable, and well-supported PSU. Today we're reviewing the second-strongest member of the family, the CX750M.

Performance, Performance Per Dollar, Noise, And Efficiency Ratings

Performance Rating

The following graph shows the CX750M's total performance rating, comparing it to other units we have tested. To be more specific, the tested unit is shown as 100 percent, and every other unit's performance is shown relative to it.

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The CX750M fares well given the tough competition we included in our graph. Unfortunately, we don't have any other 750W Bronze-rated units in our 115V database to compare.

Performance Per Dollar

The following chart may be the most interesting to many of you because it depicts the CX750M's performance-per-dollar score. We looked up the current price of each PSU on popular online shops and used those prices and all relative performance numbers to calculate the index. If the specific unit wasn't available in the United States, we searched for it in popular European Union shops, converting the listed price to USD (without VAT). Note that all of the numbers in the following graph are normalized by the rated power of each PSU.  

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Thanks to an affordable price and decent performance, the CX750M's value score is pretty high (even if it didn't demonstrate the high performance we were expecting).

Noise Rating

The graph below depicts the cooling fan's average noise over the PSU's operating range, with an ambient temperature between 28°C and 30°C (82°F to 86°F).

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Corsair's CX750M is noisier than its smaller sibling. Then again, you probably shouldn't expect silent operation from a Bronze-rated PSU with higher thermal loads, especially under tough conditions.

Efficiency Rating

The following graph shows the average efficiency of the CX750M throughout its operating range, with an ambient temperature between 28°C and 30°C.

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The overall efficiency difference with the CX650M is notable, as you can see from our efficiency graph.

  • Bit early for a review,but just installed mine to replace my old one that was power surging.
    Very easy to install and only use the extra cables you need.
    Piece of mind knowing the 3 year warranty that comes with it.
    Reply
  • RCFProd
    Thanks for the review!
    Reply
  • turkey3_scratch
    Funny how it doesn't have OTP, when as a matter of fact, OTP was the very thing that saved the original CX750M's butt in Jonnyguru's testing; but the majority of people, rather than realizing that was a good safety measure, took it instead as "the CX750M can't do more than 650W" when in fact it was just Oklahomawolf's hot box. So maybe to avoid another mishap like this altogether they just removed OTP and cheered over the money savings at the same time?

    I don't care for this PSU too much anyway. It seems to be a power supply that likes to focus on good ripple (as every modern PSU does these days) and decent voltage regulation but falls short in nearly every other aspect. I don't see it being much of any improvement over the original CX750M, the whole purpose of was probably just to cut costs. I'd happily take 60mv of ripple on my 12V rail in turn for some better holdup time, a higher quality fan and perhaps caps (if those Suscons aren't the best), and OTP.
    Reply
  • jonnyguru
    It does have OTP. There's something wrong with Aris's unit and I'm going to investigate it.
    Reply
  • JackNaylorPE
    I keep reading posts referencing the new CXM series, but the conclusions section which most readers skip to seem to follow Mom's advice ... "if ya don't have anything good to say, don't say anything" ... anything negative is left out. If the CX750M is going to be competitive, it has to address the elephant in the room that is the EVGA 750 B2 that sells for $50.
    Reply
  • RCFProd
    18929743 said:
    I keep reading posts referencing the new CXM series

    Aren't those usually either the 450w, 550w and 650 watts? Those are different units compared to the 750 watts I think.

    18929743 said:
    If the CX750M is going to be competitive, it has to address the elephant in the room that is the EVGA 750 B2 that sells for $50.

    Plenty of better options for power supplies around CX750M's price range, must be said. Isn't the EVGA B2 750w 65 dollars?
    Reply
  • turkey3_scratch
    Ya B2 is well priced http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817438028&cm_re=evga_750_b2%5c-_-17-438-028-_-Product
    Reply
  • JackNaylorPE
    The CX450M, CX550M and CX650M were redesigned last year and manufactured by CWT using a custom Corsair design, while the CX750M (and I think the 850 model) was based upon CWTs PUQ B patform. This latest revision seems to be even newer .. and even beyond that, it appears to have changed yet again after the review samples went out as noted in the article the newer 650M's use a "470uF bulk cap but use instead a 330uF one".

    Note that the CXM series is reported as the lowest quality Corsair PSU available in the US.... yet several VS models remain available thru US e-tailers. One thing I have always observed, specifically with regard to PSUs and coolers is that forum posters, even when referencing an article that says the reviewed item was a "good budget model" or "good for the money, tend to drop the words "budget" and "for the money" when recommending it. So while it may be a logical choice for a G3258 or GTX 1050 build w/ no overclocking, I don't quite understand why a Hyper 212 or a CX series PSU gets recommended for a 6700k / 1070 build especially where OP states an interest in overclocking the bejeezes out of everything.

    Here's the only reviews I have seen besides this one:
    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/corsair-cx650m-psu,4770.html
    http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReviews&op=Story&reid=486


    18929767 said:

    Aren't those usually either the 450w, 550w and 650 watts? Those are different units compared to the 750 watts I think.

    Plenty of better options for power supplies around CX750M's price range, must be said. Isn't the EVGA B2 750w 65 dollars?

    NCIX almost always has it for $50 in conjunction w/ Corsair MIR and instant savings... sometimes others like newegg

    NCIX = $45 (Savings Code 97531-1714. SAVE $25.00 off our regular price of $89.99 Special price ends 11/30/2016 + Save $20.00 USD with manufacturer's mail-in rebate!)
    http://www.ncixus.com/products/?usaffiliateid=1000031504&sku=97531&promoid=1714

    newegg = $89.99 - $20 instant savings - $20.00 rebate card = $49.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817438028
    Reply
  • powernod
    If i was short on budget i wouldn't hesitate to use Corsair's CX-M line of PSUs.
    Solid units for that kind of price.
    I don't expect to have Seasonic PRIME 750's performance with 80$ !!
    Reply
  • turkey3_scratch
    18930459 said:
    If i was short on budget i wouldn't hesitate to use Corsair's CX-M line of PSUs.
    Solid units for that kind of price.
    I don't expect to have Seasonic PRIME 750's performance with 80$ !!

    If I needed 750W and it was between the EVGA 750 B2 and the CX750M, I'd probably take the former.
    Reply