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This PC Stick Has Dual-Core SoC, 1 GB RAM, Android 4.0

Liliputing is pointing to an upcoming mini PC stick from Zero Devices called the Z2C. It will come packed with a dual-core SoC, Google's Android 4.0 "Ice Cream Sandwich" operating system, and HDMI connectivity for searching the web, playing games and more from your HDTV without having to purchase a tablet or desktop.

According to the specs, the gadget will feature a Cortex A9-based RockChip RK3066 dual-core SoC, a Vivante GC2000 GPU, and 1 GB of DDR3 memory. The device will also provide two micro USB ports (one likely for power), one USB 2.0 port, HDMI output (1080p and 2160p) and 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi connectivity.

As for storage, the device will provide 8 GB of on-board NAND Flash, and a microSD card slot for adding an additional 16 GB. That said, given the OS is seemingly Google sanctioned, users will need the extra space when installing apps and downloading media like movies and TV shows from Google Play.

Having an included USB 2.0 port is a good thing, as users can insert a wireless or Bluetooth dongle to add a compatible mouse and keyboard for couch-based computing from afar. Need more local storage? Users can add an external HDD up to 5 TB via the USB 2.0 port instead. Consumers can even transfer files back and forth when connected directly to a desktop or laptop using this port as well (although apps like AirDroid seemingly eliminate this need).

In addition to the Android device, the Z2C package will include a power adapter (likely microUSB), an HDMI cable, and a USB 2.0 cable for connecting a non-wireless peripheral. So far the actual availability is unknown, buyt a single unit will cost $82 USD. Discounts will be offered to consumers who order three or more units at once.

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  • mforce2
    This isn't really accurate, the RK3066 has a Mali GPU.
    Reply
  • ojas
    Yay another "PC" on a stick. I mean it has an SoC for heaven's sake.

    Just call it a computer-on-a-stick and leave it at that.
    Reply
  • master_chen
    I think there was already an article about this, 3 or 4 months ago.
    I clearly remember reading about that.
    Reply
  • outlw6669
    ojasYay another "PC" on a stick. I mean it has an SoC for heaven's sake.Just call it a computer-on-a-stick and leave it at that.Would that not be redundant as PC is an abbreviation for Personal Computer?
    Reply
  • back_by_demand
    This is ripe for Android-compatible XBMC, TVs with a USB service port can provide the power and the whole thing just sits invisible with your content down the network.
    Reply
  • JBB-SaDo
    So will we be seeing something like this with windows 8?...or not.
    Reply
  • Northwestern
    outlw6669Would that not be redundant as PC is an abbreviation for Personal Computer?You mean "Personalized Computing"?
    Reply
  • threehosts
    I found it quite interesting when I first saw the Raspberry Pi. I like it but I somehow find it a little stingy with only 256MB of RAM and a mere single-core CPU. Then came along the ODROID-X and the Pandaboard which started to make a lot more sense to me, until I really looked into the price tag.

    Once you include the peripherals needed for a useful setup it dawned on me that you can get a pretty capable system comprising a microATX or miniITX motherboard and a full-blown multicore CPU for around the same price.

    So such a DYI system only makes sense if you have a need for high portability, too bad that they don't offer good configurations with proper Li-Ion casings. I for one wouldn't mind building myself a portable media player with a large 2.5" SSD disk (or perhaps a USB stick) and a 5100mAh battery slapped onto it. The only problem though seems to be that they probably are not so optimized for low power applications.
    Reply
  • outlw6669
    NorthwesternYou mean "Personalized Computing"?Just because Intel wants to redefine PC as Personal Computing does not mean we must or will.
    PC has meant Personal Computer since the early 1960's; I for one will not change that definition only because Intel wants to sell more overpriced Atom chips and servers.
    Reply
  • Northwestern
    outlw6669Just because Intel wants to redefine PC as Personal Computing does not mean we must or will.PC has meant Personal Computer since the early 1960's; I for one will not change that definition only because Intel wants to sell more overpriced Atom chips and servers.I'm aware, I was just poking fun at the fact Microsoft (Not Intel) thought they could make the whole technological sector change the definition of an acronym that has been used since Bill Gates was in elementary school.
    Reply