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Dell Adamo Battery Not Swappable

Move over Apple MacBook, word’s come out that the Dell Adamo does not have an easily swappable battery.


We’re all collectively lusting after the form-conscious Dell Adamo. It’s sleek, looks well-built, and something we’d love to have with us while we’re mobile -- unless if battery life is an factor.

Pocket-lint reports that the Dell Adamo does not have an easily removable battery, meaning that users who are looking for unplugged time beyond a single pack will be out of luck.

While a swappable battery is commonplace on electronics, there’s been a recent trend of building the power system integrated as part of the internals. Apple’s MacBook Air has an integrated battery, likely to facilitate the slim form factor. The new MacBook Pro 17-inch also does away with the swappable battery for the sake of a larger pack to extend uptime.

Dell has yet to explain the Adamo’s battery design, but we figure that it is done for reasons similar to Apple’s on the MacBooks. We’ll keep you posted as soon as Dell spills on the replacement and service costs.

Marcus Yam
Marcus Yam served as Tom's Hardware News Director during 2008-2014. He entered tech media in the late 90s and fondly remembers the days when an overclocked Celeron 300A and Voodoo2 SLI comprised a gaming rig with the ultimate street cred.
  • lire210
    well thats lame.
    looks better then a macbook tho really sexy.
    love the lid just looks cool brushed alu and all nice.
    Hope that the reports are wrong but tomz is good so=(
    Reply
  • jsloan
    looks over substance.
    Reply
  • thepinkpanther
    meh i think the voodoo envy 133 is better than the other 2 (Alamo, Mack book.) However, no matter how good it looks, id never buy a laptop without discrete graphics card, id settle for the 3470, or 9400. I know mack book has the 9400, but i think its the uglyist (my opinion.)
    Reply
  • pharge
    "1.2GHz Intel Core 2 Duo Processor with Centrino technology
    Genuine Windows Vista® Home Premium SP1 64-Bit
    2GB 800MHz DDR3 dual-channel memory1
    128GB1 solid state drive"

    ugh... 128 SSD sounds cool.. but... 1.2GHz C2D?..O.o; 2G DDR3? GS45 graphic?...5hr battery life and nonswappable battery? and for $1999 or more!! O.O.... um...
    Reply
  • Tindytim
    This is just one more reason that thin laptops are completely retarded.

    To think, for a few more fractions of an inch, you could get a better graphics solution, a swappable batteries and all of a much cheaper price.
    Reply
  • Marcus Yam
    TindytimThis is just one more reason that thin laptops are completely retarded.To think, for a few more fractions of an inch, you could get a better graphics solution, a swappable batteries and all of a much cheaper price.The same sort of thinking applies to many goods, but perhaps best to cars. For just a few more seconds to go from 0 to 60 and back to 0 again, you could get a lot more trunk space, more seats, and a much, much cheaper price.

    The people who buy an Adamo or Envy or Air know exactly what they're getting. Well, I would hope.
    Reply
  • Tindytim
    Marcus YamThe same sort of thinking applies to many goods, but perhaps best to cars. For just a few more seconds to go from 0 to 60 and back to 0 again, you could get a lot more trunk space, more seats, and a much, much cheaper price.
    You can't compare that to this. That's tangible performance, this is a gimmick. What tangible benefit does having a laptop a few fractions of an inch thinner bring? I suppose you could stuff a small stack of notebook paper in a bag, but I don't see that being a huge benefit.

    Marcus YamThe people who buy an Adamo or Envy or Air know exactly what they're getting. Well, I would hope.I doubt all of them do. That's the benefit of a gimmick for a company. They can gloss over the details with marketing hype.
    Reply
  • magicandy
    Marcus YamThe same sort of thinking applies to many goods, but perhaps best to cars. For just a few more seconds to go from 0 to 60 and back to 0 again, you could get a lot more trunk space, more seats, and a much, much cheaper price.The people who buy an Adamo or Envy or Air know exactly what they're getting. Well, I would hope.
    That's a bad analogy because seconds to go from 0 to 60 is a number based on performance. How thin a laptop is has nothing to do with performance, only looks. A better analogy would be a person constructing a car out of solid gold. Sure, the exterior would look neat but it would be so heavy the gas mileage would be murder.

    I know what you're saying and I agree that people who buy these things know what they're getting into, but there's a difference between paying out the ass for that tiny extra bit of performance and paying out the ass for a prettier design while sacrificing performance.
    Reply
  • magicandy
    Oh wow I hadn't refreshed in a while =/
    Reply
  • jawshoeaw
    Ugly looking thing in my opinion. I don't see what the big deal is about thinness , but weight is everything for some people.

    I think the car analogy is pretty fair though - people pay thousands, even tens of thousands extra for cars that essentially do things marginally better than cheaper alternatives. I bought a 6 cylinder model over the four cylinder - you can argue that there was some sort of numerical "performance" advantage, but that would only be true if I was racing - just like the performance of a laptop, 99% of the time it's unused while you type, read email, browse the internet, watch video a celeron and integrated graphics could handle. How many gamers buy hardware partly for image?

    Maybe a better analogy is buying a new car over a used - thousands wasted on image or feel. I've bought new cars - it felt great, smelled great, I loved it. Huge waste of money in retrospect.

    A final thought, now that advances in computing power for most users are increasingly unnecessary, style is creeping back in as a marketing tool. "Ugh, is that last fall's laptop you're wearing?" And when are flexible displays and fuel cell batteries coming??!!
    Reply