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Gigabyte Releases Statement On Exploding PSUs

Gigabyte GP-P850GM
Gigabyte GP-P850GM (Image credit: Gigabyte)

Gigabyte's GP-P850GM and GP-P750GM power supplies have been making rounds around hardware circles for all the bad reasons. Apparently, these two models have high failure rates and may be ticking time bombs for owners. Gigabyte has released its statement detailing the solution in regards to the reported failures from users and news outlets.

Consumers who managed to purchase a GeForce RTX 30-series (Ampere) graphics card from Newegg in the last couple of months probably heard of or own the GP-P850GM or GP-P750GM. The retailer paired Nvidia's RTX 30-series graphics card with one of the aforementioned power supplies as part of bundles so Ampere adopters forcibly had to buy a power supply with the graphics card regardless if they needed it or not.

Neither the GP-P850GM or the GP-P750GM has a good reputation on Newegg. Out of the 92 consumers who bought the GP-P850GM, 39% of the user base left a one egg rating. The feedback for the GP-P750GM is even more alarming. According to Newegg, 53% of the 305 buyers left the lowest rating. The two most common complaints were units being defective upon arrival and premature failures, which in some occasions exploded and took out other components with it.

According to Gamers Nexus, 50% of the 10 power supplies failed during or after over power protection (OPP) tests. Some units failed at 60% load just after the first pass. The publication also conducted a survey with its community where 16% of the users claimed their power supplies failed unexpectedly and were no longer operational.

Gigabyte GP-P850GM and GP-P750GM Modifications

Previous OPP Trigger PointNew OPP Trigger Point
GP-P850GM120% ~ 150% (1,020W ~ 1,300W)110% ~ 120% (950W ~ 1,050W)
GP-P750GM120% ~ 150% (900W ~ 1,125W)110% ~ 120% (825W ~ 925W)

Aris Mpitziopoulos, our resident power supply guru, reviewed the GP-P750GM on his Hardware Busters YouTube channel, and his sample had also exploded with fireworks. Mpitziopoulos concluded that the OPP and OCP at 12V protections were set too high and the questionable FETs simply couldn't deal with the load. Even with his years of experience in the field, the GP-P750GM utilized parts from brands that Mpitziopoulos had never heard about, which make us doubt the quality of the components.

Gigabyte's solution consists in lowering the OPP trigger point for the GP-P850GM and GP-P750GM. The manufactuer reduced the threshold from 120% to 150% down to 110% and 120% for both units. In its statement, Gigabyte reaffirms that "the potential issues that were reported, only seemed to occur after very long time periods of extreme load testing via DC Electronic load equipment and would not be typical of any real world usage."

Gigabyte claims that the old and new OPP thresholds are suitable for everyday usage. Nonetheless, the company is willing to offer owners a replacement with the new OPP limits. GP-P850GM with the serial number between SN20343G031011 to SN20513G022635 and GP-P750GM with the serial number from SN20243G001301 to SN20453G025430 are eligible for the exchange.

However, we're not convinced that adjusting the OPP protection is the answer to the GP-P850GM and GP-P750GM's problems. The majority of the user feedback on Newegg involves DOA (dead on arrival) and failing units. The problem may be deeper and could lie with the design itself or Gigabyte's selection of components for the power supply.

  • exploding_psu
    Now this is my kind of news.

    I got myself a Gigabyte PSU (a P550B) to power a fairly standard Ryzen 3 2200G system. Office use, nothing fancy, no power-hungry parts. It died within a week after I first powered it up. I still don't know how and why it died powering such a low-stress system.

    Luckily the RMA process was very quick, so the PC's back up and running in a short time. I've got my own share of running cheap PSUs, but this is the first time a PSU died in less than a week of use, even those generic "dongfeng" no-label, bare aluminium PSUs none of them died this quickly. And this is big name brand.
    Reply
  • Co BIY
    While I don't doubt these are bad units (especially when review models blow up) selling them as the "ugly sister" in a forced bundle to hostage customers makes for bad warranty return incentives.
    Reply
  • leorick
    exploding_psu said:
    Now this is my kind of news.

    I got myself a Gigabyte PSU (a P550B) to power a fairly standard Ryzen 3 2200G system. Office use, nothing fancy, no power-hungry parts. It died within a week after I first powered it up. I still don't know how and why it died powering such a low-stress system.

    Luckily the RMA process was very quick, so the PC's back up and running in a short time. I've got my own share of running cheap PSUs, but this is the first time a PSU died in less than a week of use, even those generic "dongfeng" no-label, bare aluminium PSUs none of them died this quickly. And this is big name brand.

    Oh that is disappointing. I was kinda hoping it wouldn't be the case with their entry level PSU's. I have deployed several of these to my customers and one to my nephew on entry level systems as well. Gigabyte had always served me well in the past. With the exception of the Odin series (700w), I've had like 2 out of 3 of them popped up like the ones in Gamer's Nexus videos.
    Reply
  • watzupken
    In a nutshell, if you have one of these exploding time bomb PSUs, return it. Let Gigabyte deal with the mess they started. It’s a fire hazard and not worth risking killing your system or burning down your place. It’s not dramatic because the spark from the blown PSU may ignite a fire depending on what is nearby.
    Reply
  • btmedic04
    im already looking forward to GN testing the revised models and Steve annihilating gigabytes response
    Reply
  • DookieDraws
    Damn a replacement, I'd want a refund!
    Reply
  • DSzymborski
    This isn't really a new development; they've sold a lot of cheap costed-down PSUs for quite a while now. They're only getting attention now because so many people have been stuck with them.

    I was quite fortunate. I got a 7:30 PM Newegg bundle drop back in January that had a Gigabyte PSU, but it was a big drop night and Newegg ran short of Gigabyte PSUs and it was automatically removed from my cart on checkout with the price taken out. I was quite pleased at the time and still am!
    Reply
  • TechLurker
    I'd be more willing to trust Gigabyte if they were willing to bite the bullet and offer up their AORUS PSUs as a replacement; at least those are more likely to have been better vetted given it's their flagship PSU line. But just replacing the defective PSUs with variants with an adjusted limiter is like trading in a defective Note 7 for another Note 7 claimed to have had the problem fixed. Only to find out later when it goes out more spectacularly that the problem is still there.
    Reply
  • digitalgriffin
    This is the kind of stuff class action lawsuits are made of.

    When it takes out your other components. Or starts fires, yep you have a valid claim for damages.

    Gigabyte and new egg know these are defective. Now they are doing the dog and pony to cover their tail.

    Gigabyte and msi are off my buy list
    ASRock is off my mb buy list due to Intel vrm fiasco.
    Reply
  • escksu
    I don't think its really wise to continue using it regardless of what Gigabyte says. Exchanging it with a new one does not guarantee that it will not fail and take out the rest of the PC. just get it from a reputable manufacturer like SEasonic etc....
    Reply