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Google's Chromebook Pixel 2 Debuts On New Google Store

The specs also show that the new Pixel is capable of 4K video output over an optional HDMI or DisplayPort adapter connected to one of the USB Type-C ports. These ports are capable of data speeds of up to 5 Gbps and 60 W charging of external devices.

Not only does Type-C enable multi-device charging, but it also allows high-speed data and display over the same connector and cable," Bowers said in his blog. "It's small enough to work with smartphones, powerful enough to charge computers, and conveniently symmetrical. (No more guessing which side is up!) Speaking of symmetry, the new Pixel doesn't just have one Type C port—it has two, one on each side, so you can plug it in wherever is convenient."

In addition to revealing the updated Chromebook Pixel, Google also launched the Google Store. Why launch a separate storefront? According to Bowers, the devices section on Google Play has grown too large and requires that the company launch a standalone site. Here, customers can check out the latest Google devices, learn more about Google's Android Wear platform and more. Order anything from Google Store now and receive free shipping.

Google Store is broken into seven categories: Phones, Tablets, Chromebooks, TV & Video, Android Wear, Nest and Accessories. Highlighted products on the main page include the new Chromebook Pixel, the Nexus 6, the Nexus 9 tablet, Android Wear devices, the Nexus Player, Chromecast and the Nest Learning Thermostat. Customers can even learn about Android 5.0 "Lollipop" by heading here.

If you check out the new Chromebook Pixel on Google Store, you'll see that the Chrome OS laptop has a meaty starting price of $999. That's with the Core i5 processor, 8 GB of RAM and the 32 GB SSD crammed inside. If money isn't an issue, then customers can get the model with an Intel Core i7, 16 GB of RAM and a 64 GB SSD for $1,299.

Happy shopping!

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  • TechyInAZ
    Since Chrome OS only uses mobile apps mainly, i don't see the point in getting a core i7 for it. Core i5 is plenty i'd assume.
    Reply
  • The_One_and_Only
    Overprice much?
    Reply
  • ericburnby
    Wow, look at all those ports and nothing that you can really use them for.

    And people were complaining that Apple overcharges for MacBooks?
    Reply
  • RoxasForTheWin
    Now you can browse the net in glorious 2560x1700
    Reply
  • vmem
    Does still come with the 3 years of 1TB google drive storage the original chrome pixel does? that's really what you're paying for since this thing is useless without cloud storage

    Also while the original pixel was revolutionary for the high resolution screen in such a "light weight" laptop, this is no longer the case... I don't even see a niche market for this, you're better off with the new macbook air in pretty much all usage scenarios (not to mention a variety of other alternatives)
    Reply
  • If this really has 12 hours of battery life, and a good keyboard, I'm buying. People can laugh all they want, this is the future. High-end local hardware leveraging powerful remote hardware. It's like the thin clients of the 90's. Except with 16 GB of ram and 2560 x 1700 resolution.
    Reply
  • fixxxer113
    It's like the thin clients of the 90's. Except with 16 GB of ram and 2560 x 1700 resolution.

    So, not really a thin client...
    Reply
  • kawininjazx
    I love my chromebook, the Celeron processor and 2GB of RAM just flies, and the battery is amazing.
    Reply
  • soccerplayer88
    "The new Chromebook Pixel packs a 12.85-inch screen boasting a 2560 x 1700 resolution"

    I award you no points and may God have mercy on your soul.
    Reply
  • tylanner
    This product is not meant to be a mass produced, mainstream product like the MB pro or any other ultrabook.

    This is for enthusiasts who love/develop on the chrome OS platform and is more likely filling a slot in the lineup and not intended to make any real money for the company...

    Think "proof-of-concept"
    Reply