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SilverStone Launches 1650W PSU For The Big Ferocious GeForce RTX 3090 GPU

SilverStone DA1650 (Image credit: SilverStone)

SilverStone has rolled out the company's new DA1650 power supply that's designed to power Nvidia's GeForce RTX 3090, the current fastest gaming graphics card on the market.

With dimensions of 150 x 86 x 180mm (5.91 x 3.39 x 7.09 inches), the DA1650 comes with a whopping capacity of 1,650W. The GeForce RTX 3090 is the only Ampere-powered graphics card that supports SLI and with a 350W TDP (thermal design power) rating means that the DA1650 can power two GeForce RTX 3090 and still have leftover power capacity to spare.

Initially, SilverStone will offer the DA1650 in a 80Plus Gold flavor, but the manufacturer has assured its more demanding fans that the 80Plus Titanium version is on the way. The DA1650 features a single rail design that delivers 137.5A and Japanese capacitors.

SilverStone DA1650 Specifications

+3.3V+5V+12V+5VSB-12V
DC Output25A25A137.5A3.A0.3A
Total Power130W130W1,650W15W3.6W

SilverStone designed the DA1650 to work in harsh environments with temperatures up to 50 degrees Celsius. A single 135mm fluid dynamic bearing (FDB) cooling fan is responsible for providing the DA1650 with active cooling. It comes with a fanless operation mode for up to a 30% (495W) load. The maximum rotation speed is a tad under the 1,800 RPM mark with a noise up to 36dBA.

The power supply arrives a completely modular design and flat cables to assist you with your cable management. The DA1650 has the typical electrical protections that you would expect from a high-end unit, including OCP, OPP, OVP, SCP, UVP and OTP.

SilverStone backs the DA1650 with a limited five-year warranty. The 80Plus Gold version (SST-DA1650-G) will retails for $330.

  • neojack
    On a side note :
    1650W is the power available to the components (DC side)

    on the wall at full capacity the feed would be around 1800w

    1800w at 120v = 15A
    15A is the maximum amperage for regular power circuits (in North America at least).
    ok some circuits have 20A but it's less common.

    in other words, to use this PSU at full capacity, you need a dedicate circuit for only the computer, directly from the from the electric panel.
    anything more would trip the circuit breaker

    Also it's not recommended to use a circuit near full capacity for extended periods of time, so a 20A line is definitely more appropriate.
    Reply
  • Unolocogringo
    US code for wall outlets has to be on a 20 amp circuit 12awg with 15 amp receptacles.
    Unless it is a dedicated circuit then you would use a 20 amp receptacle.
    It has been this way since the mid 80s when I first started wiring houses. How far it goes back I do not know.
    Most 15 amp circuits are lighting circuits. with 14awg wiring.
    Not sure what part of North America you are from but that is US code for wiring.
    Some much older homes can have sub standard wiring but anything 50 years or less should have proper wiring.
    Unless someone cut corners and did a ------ job.
    Reply
  • drivinfast247
    Unolocogringo said:
    US code for wall outlets has to be on a 20 amp circuit 12awg with 15 amp receptacles.
    Unless it is a dedicated circuit then you would use a 20 amp receptacle.
    It has been this way since the mid 80s when I first started wiring houses. How far it goes back I do not know.
    Most 15 amp circuits are lighting circuits. with 14awg wiring.
    Not sure what part of North America you are from but that is US code for wiring.
    Some much older homes can have sub standard wiring but anything 50 years or less should have proper wiring.
    Unless someone cut corners and did a ------ job.
    That code is definitely not national. Please show or link where this is stated. A bedroom or living room will typically have a 15amp circuit. A kitchen, bathroom or appliance will have a 20amp circuit.
    Reply
  • deesider
    neojack said:
    in other words, to use this PSU at full capacity, you need a dedicate circuit for only the computer, directly from the from the electric panel.
    anything more would trip the circuit breaker
    So what? Who expects to draw maximum power from their power supply at any point ever?

    In any practical implementation this PSU is safe and fine to use on any conventional domestic outlet.
    Reply
  • OriginFree
    neojack said:
    On a side note :
    1650W is the power available to the components (DC side)

    on the wall at full capacity the feed would be around 1800w

    1800w at 120v = 15A
    15A is the maximum amperage for regular power circuits (in North America at least).
    ok some circuits have 20A but it's less common.

    in other words, to use this PSU at full capacity, you need a dedicate circuit for only the computer, directly from the from the electric panel.
    anything more would trip the circuit breaker

    Also it's not recommended to use a circuit near full capacity for extended periods of time, so a 20A line is definitely more appropriate.


    Buddy of mine is a sparky (electrician). Rule of thumb is max 80% of the breaker rating. So a 20 amps line should not be pushed above 16 amps for an extended period of time.
    Reply
  • Unolocogringo
    We have a National Electric Code.
    For places that do not have a local or regional code.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Electrical_Code
    Reply
  • neojack
    deesider said:
    So what? Who expects to draw maximum power from their power supply at any point ever?

    In any practical implementation this PSU is safe and fine to use on any conventional domestic outlet.

    Just pointing out that if someone wants to bring together a very high powered PC, the PSU may not be the weaker part of the chain. You basically need a dedicated circuit to use all of the available power.
    Knowing this, a savvy shopper may prefer to buy a less powerfull PSU.

    Also explaining why we will never see 2000w PSUs (unless they run on 240v 30A like a baseboard heater or an EVSE lol )

    I know nowadays electricians tend to install a lot more circuits, but it was not the case like 30 years ago.

    for exemple, all my regular power plugs at home are on 15A circuits, several shared with lights etc. I think I have about 4x or 5x 15A circuits shared for the 2-stories appartment, with 2x 20A for the kitchen. all the other slots are used for 240v.
    been the case in all of my former appartments.
    Reply
  • deesider
    neojack said:
    Just pointing out that if someone wants to bring together a very high powered PC, the PSU may not be the weaker part of the chain. You basically need a dedicated circuit to use all of the available power.
    Knowing this, a savvy shopper may prefer to buy a less powerfull PSU.
    Yeah, seems to be more of an issue for North Americans. I come from 230V land, so there is a lot more leeway when all outlets are rated for 2300W, and it is standard practise for outlet circuits to be wired for 20A. Actually, sparkies seem to use the same cable for everything, so even a 7A lighting circuit will use 20A cable (their time costs more than the cable I guess).

    Still possible to blow a fuse, but takes more effort!
    Reply