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Samsung 512GB SSD Has Toggle-mode DDR NAND

SSDs are now hitting sizes that are beginning to make them viable replacements for the magnetic counterparts. Samsung has introduced a new SSD offering in a 512GB configuration – boasting both capacity and speed, utilizing high-performance "toggle-mode" DDR NAND.

"The highly advanced features and characteristics of our new SSD were obtained as a direct result of an aggressive push for further development of our NAND flash technology, our SSD controller and our supportive SSD firmware," said Dong-Soo Jun, executive vice president, memory marketing, Samsung Electronics. "Early introduction of this state-of-the-art toggle DDR solution will enable Samsung to play a major role in securing faster market acceptance of the new wave of high-end SSD technology," he added.

The new 512GB SSD makes use of a 30 nanometer-class 32 gigabit chip that the company began producing last November. The toggle-mode DDR structure together with the SATA 3.0Gbps interface generates a maximum sequential read speed of 250 MBps and a 220MBps sequential write speed, both of which provide three-fold the performance of a typical hard disk drive.

Samsung says that those speeds could mean that two 4GB DVD movies can be stored in just a minute.

Samsung provides further gains in power efficiency by having developed a low-power controller specifically for toggle-mode DDR NAND. The resulting power throttling capability enables the drive's high-performance levels without any increase in power consumption over a 40nm-class 16Gb NAND-based 256GB SSD. The controller also analyzes frequency of use and preferences of the user to automatically activate a low-power mode that can extend a notebook's battery life for an hour or more (but probably only in best-case-scenarios).

Samsung plans to begin volume production of the 512GB SSD next month.

  • Blessedman
    Well this won't be cheap, but I guess the good news is with each new step, the older models are less viable and become way way cheaper! We hopefully will see that magical 1$ per GB number soon!
    Reply
  • aquila
    This bodes well for the consumer in the long run...
    Reply
  • the_krasno
    BlessedmanWell this won't be cheap, but I guess the good news is with each new step, the older models are less viable and become way way cheaper! We hopefully will see that magical 1$ per GB number soon!
    I'm waiting for $0.4 per GB to upgrade... I'm waiting sitting down, luckily.
    Reply
  • tanjali
    Why ignoring already better technology with SandForce based controller processors and investing in slower one, is it going really going to be cheaper and with room to develop?
    Reply
  • sseyler
    "The toggle-mode DDR structure together with the SATA 3.0Gbps interface generates a maximum sequential read speed of 250 MBps and a 220MBps sequential write speed, both of which provide three-fold the performance of a typical hard disk drive."

    This is stated as if we don't already have drives capable of doing this...
    Reply
  • procyon
    This is a big, fast SSD. We want it.

    Why do we want it? It's not that fast...
    Reply
  • freiheitner
    And what is "toggle-mode"? Is there a switch on the unit to make it go faster? If so (or something like that) what's the drawback to just having that be on all the time?
    Reply
  • eklipz330
    BlessedmanWell this won't be cheap, but I guess the good news is with each new step, the older models are less viable and become way way cheaper! We hopefully will see that magical 1$ per GB number soon!you realize $1 per GB will still make this SSD $512... I've seen a few SSD's on sale that have been $1.50 per gig, still way to much. tell me when this is in the ~$200 range
    Reply
  • metallifux
    How long before motherboards incorporate a few gigs of DDR NAND allowing you to install your OS on them. Seems like a good idea to me.
    Reply
  • renixis_infinity
    I Hope 1TB+ SSD comes out soon in a few months

    Can't wait for the time 128GB/256GB SSD to become cheap
    Reply