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Futuremark Publishes OUYA Console Dev Kit Benchmark

By - Source: Futuremark | B 17 comments

The OUYA dev kit under-performs many current-generation Android smartphones.

Futuremark has released the 3DMark results of an early version of OUYA, the upcoming Android-based gaming console slated for a June release. The benchmark stems from James Coote, the developer behind the upcoming OUYA game Executive Star, who tested the developer kit version of the console.

According to Futuremark, the device ranks as #73 on Futuremark's Best Mobile Devices of April 2013, falling behind the Samsung Galaxy S IV, the HTC One, the Nexus 10, the Samsung Galaxy Express and loads more tablets and smartphones. However, given that the benchmark wasn't performed on the final retail release, these numbers will likely improve when the device hits store shelves in two months.

"Ice Storm is an OpenGL ES 2.0 benchmark that uses a fixed off-screen rendering resolution of 720p before scaling the output to fit the native display resolution of the device," Futuremark said on Monday. "Ice Storm includes two graphics tests designed to stress the GPU performance of the device and a physics test to stress its CPU performance."

According to the current dev kit benchmark stats, the Android console has an average score of 4084. Other default scores include 3612 for graphics, 7538 for physics, 14 FPS in the first graphics test, 17.9 FPS in the second test, and 23.9 FPS in the physics test.

On the Extreme end, the OUYA has an average score of 2332. This is broken down to a 1944 for graphics, 7731 for physics, 9.2 FPS for the first graphics test, 7.8 FPS for the second test, and 24.5 FPS for the physics test. Remember, these numbers are based on a quad-core Tegra 3 SoC clocked at 1.6 GHz, 1 GB of RAM, and Google's Android 4.1 "Jelly Bean" operating system.

Compared to the Tegra 3-powered Nexus 7 (#120), the OUYA dev kit provides better performance. The Nexus 7, manufactured by Asus, has a Tegra 3 clocked at only 1.3 GHz and 1 GB of RAM. But its average score is only 3551, consisting of a 3156 for graphics, a 6422 for physics, 12.6 FPS in graphics test 1, 15.6 FPS in graphics test 2, and 20.4 FPS in the physics test.

Other devices the OUYA console outperforms include Sony's PlayStation-certified Xperia Tablet S, the Asus Transformer Prime TF201, the LG Optimus LTE Tag, the Acer Iconia Tab A700, the Samsung Galaxy S II, the Samsung Galaxy Tab 8.9 and 10.1 LTE, and numerous others. The entire list consists of 258 devices spanning smartphones and tablets.

"I want to make sure you know what we are building, when, and to keep you updated on how we are constantly evolving and incorporating both your feedback and our learnings," said OUYA CEO Julie Uhrman earlier this month. "We will continue to obsess over quality and performance."

It will be interesting to see how OUYA scores in June when the final version is released. In the video below, Coote notes that the benchmark was performed at 1080p Full HD – the console scored a higher 4355 running at 640 x 480. Also, the results stem from a dev kit that does not include hardware changes made since January.

OUYA 3DMark Benchmark



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Display 17 Comments.
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  • 0 Hide
    unknown9122 , April 16, 2013 5:05 PM
    I hope they upgrade the Tegra 3 1GB of RAM to a Tegra 4 2GB of RAM for the final release.
  • 7 Hide
    therabiddeer , April 16, 2013 5:06 PM
    So it isnt even released and smartphones already beat it in performance. Tell me again why I shouldnt just get a controller for the phone and plug the phone into my TV? Why buy this separate console? If it is already behind current gen I can just upgrade my phone every couple years with a new contract for the same price and not pay the extra $100 for a new console.
  • 0 Hide
    therabiddeer , April 16, 2013 5:08 PM
    So it isnt even released and smartphones already beat it in performance. Tell me again why I shouldnt just get a controller for the phone and plug the phone into my TV? Why buy this separate console? If it is already behind current gen I can just upgrade my phone every couple years with a new contract for the same price and not pay the extra $100 for a new console.
  • 6 Hide
    therabiddeer , April 16, 2013 5:08 PM
    Note to self: Hitting f5 will repost your comment.
  • -2 Hide
    unknown9122 , April 16, 2013 5:18 PM
    I hope they upgrade the Tegra 3 1GB of RAM to a Tegra 4 2GB of RAM for the final release.
  • 6 Hide
    dsigned , April 16, 2013 5:57 PM
    Your used smartphone + controller likely still costs more than this thing, and also doesn't come with cables, and won't be optimized for a big screen. Plus, not everyone's phone is in the best of shape at the end of their contract. Plus it's a consistent set of hardware to develop for, which means that it will likely have better support for controller based games as well.

    I think for the price, the (supposed) reliability, and the "togetherness" of it, it's a totally reasonable price. It's going to have to really hit it out of the park for me to buy one, but I'm not opposed to it in principle.
  • -1 Hide
    therabiddeer , April 16, 2013 6:11 PM
    @dsigned (no quote system... and adding comment field is at the top ><)
    The Galaxy S3 is $50 with an upgrade 2 year contract. The Galaxy S3 ranks better in performance than the Ouya (S3 is 58th). You can easily get a wickedly good controller for under $50. They are both android platform with similar hardware so you wont see a difference in performance because of that. Even the hardware on the Ouya will be changing annually so that is no more consistent than the smartphones.

    If your phone isnt in good shape somehow, then treat your phone better. The console is set at the right price, but it is unnecessary for anybody that has a smart phone every 2 years. Which is a huge number of people. Well beyond half of people that have a mobile phone use a smartphone.

    This console might be a decent addition for kids (pending the games released) but for anybody else it is not needed.

    PS: An error has occurred.
    Wish it would tell me what kind of error.
  • 2 Hide
    Gundam288 , April 16, 2013 7:31 PM
    I would be willing to use an OUYA as my main console if Toms fix the comments system. (or at least rolls it back to the old style as that seem to work better than this...)
  • -3 Hide
    Branden , April 16, 2013 7:34 PM
    hitting F5 reposts your comment?
  • -3 Hide
    Branden , April 16, 2013 7:35 PM
    hitting F5 reposts your comment?
  • 1 Hide
    Branden , April 16, 2013 7:35 PM
    huh, well there's a glitch tom's needs to fix.
  • 0 Hide
    bustapr , April 16, 2013 8:19 PM
    very nice thg, this new comments system isnt buggy at all. I just wonder what this "an error has occured." message that appears every time I try to post a longish comment. -_-
  • 0 Hide
    ojas , April 17, 2013 1:39 AM
    Quote:
    @dsigned (no quote system... and adding comment field is at the top ><)


    There is :p 
  • 0 Hide
    heero yuy , April 17, 2013 6:02 AM
    phones beat it yes
    but remember that the hardware will be the same across all ouya units (kind of like a console you know?) meaning developers can code for that hardware and get more performance out of it meaning games will be able to look better as they get to grips with what they are working with (you know like how every console ever has done? compare the first 360 games with the ones coming out these days)
  • 0 Hide
    therabiddeer , April 17, 2013 5:13 PM
    Quote:
    Quote:
    @dsigned (no quote system... and adding comment field is at the top ><)


    There is :p 

    No quote button. And not knowing the syntax makes it even more difficult to work in a quote (I am doing this via the forum instead of the comment section).
    Quote:
    phones beat it yes
    but remember that the hardware will be the same across all ouya units (kind of like a console you know?) meaning developers can code for that hardware and get more performance out of it meaning games will be able to look better as they get to grips with what they are working with (you know like how every console ever has done? compare the first 360 games with the ones coming out these days)

    Consoles get that benefit because they use the same hardware/os for 6+ years. The Ouya is getting new hardware every year since they plan to have an annual release. There will be no time to do the same type of "console optimization". They will likely also upgrade their OS, and droid OS upgrades seem to be different than MS updates (though I could be wrong here). It is no different than phone hardware in regards to anything though.
  • 0 Hide
    heero yuy , April 17, 2013 6:49 PM
    Quote:
    Quote:
    Quote:
    @dsigned (no quote system... and adding comment field is at the top ><)


    There is :p 

    No quote button. And not knowing the syntax makes it even more difficult to work in a quote (I am doing this via the forum instead of the comment section).
    Quote:
    phones beat it yes
    but remember that the hardware will be the same across all ouya units (kind of like a console you know?) meaning developers can code for that hardware and get more performance out of it meaning games will be able to look better as they get to grips with what they are working with (you know like how every console ever has done? compare the first 360 games with the ones coming out these days)

    Consoles get that benefit because they use the same hardware/os for 6+ years. The Ouya is getting new hardware every year since they plan to have an annual release. There will be no time to do the same type of "console optimization". They will likely also upgrade their OS, and droid OS upgrades seem to be different than MS updates (though I could be wrong here). It is no different than phone hardware in regards to anything though.


    the yearly release thing was set in stone? the only thing I heard about it was that they were thinking about it still its like $90? (last time I looked) so about £50 a year for an open source console that should have a lot of indie devs and the yearly hardware refresh should stop stagnation (also I heard something about that theres going to be something so that devs can make their own attachment/controller for it but that was months ago and I forget where I heard it)
  • 0 Hide
    therabiddeer , April 17, 2013 11:07 PM
    Quote:
    Quote:
    Quote:
    Quote:
    @dsigned (no quote system... and adding comment field is at the top ><)


    There is :p 

    No quote button. And not knowing the syntax makes it even more difficult to work in a quote (I am doing this via the forum instead of the comment section).
    Quote:
    phones beat it yes
    but remember that the hardware will be the same across all ouya units (kind of like a console you know?) meaning developers can code for that hardware and get more performance out of it meaning games will be able to look better as they get to grips with what they are working with (you know like how every console ever has done? compare the first 360 games with the ones coming out these days)

    Consoles get that benefit because they use the same hardware/os for 6+ years. The Ouya is getting new hardware every year since they plan to have an annual release. There will be no time to do the same type of "console optimization". They will likely also upgrade their OS, and droid OS upgrades seem to be different than MS updates (though I could be wrong here). It is no different than phone hardware in regards to anything though.


    the yearly release thing was set in stone? the only thing I heard about it was that they were thinking about it still its like $90? (last time I looked) so about £50 a year for an open source console that should have a lot of indie devs and the yearly hardware refresh should stop stagnation (also I heard something about that theres going to be something so that devs can make their own attachment/controller for it but that was months ago and I forget where I heard it)

    Yea, annual release for $99. Which means it isnt a typical console that has 6 years of optimizations. New cellphones are using the same hardware and nearly the same OS so games should work on the phones too. Additionally, phones typically release once per year too. So right now, for $50 and a 2 year contract that you are going to use anyway you have a phone that is slightly more powerful than the Ouya (the galaxy S3). Two years later, you can do the same thing for another $50 (some companies may offer upgrade options every year, I dont bother so I havent looked into it).

    So:
    Ouya and Smartphones have:
    The exact same hardware
    Almost the exact same OS
    Both hook up to a TV
    Both have controllers available

    Or, everything is the same as a smartphone except the Ouya is a "console". So, like I say... unnecessary for everybody except people that have younger kids (I say younger, because most every teen has a smartphone too these days)