Windows 7 Upgrade Could Take Over 20 Hours

While we're not going to dispute that a clean install is the way to run Windows 7, there are going to be many users who will choose the literal upgrade path from Windows Vista and perform an in-place upgrade.

The reasons to do an in-place upgrade are numerous. First of all, the core software changes to go from Vista to 7 aren't as drastic as previous generations of Windows. Secondly, the convenience afforded by the in-place upgrade allows users to retain nearly all software and settings without the need to restore any previously backed up data.

Another possible advantage to doing an in-place upgrade is time – it's supposed to be faster than starting fresh and reloading all your old programs. But in some cases, the upgrade could be the more time-consuming route.

Microsoft's Chris Hernandez of the Windows Deployment team detailed Windows 7 upgrade performance as compared to Vista SP1's upgrade behavior. Hernandez found that Windows 7's upgrade speed was faster than Windows Vista. Interestingly, the time it took for Windows 7 to upgrade from Windows Vista SP1 outpaced that of a Vista SP1 to Vista SP1 upgrade procedure.

At its very worst the upgrade from Windows Vista to 7 was found to take a whopping 20 hours. At that rate, a user would likely have less downtime if he or she just did a clean install and restored/reinstalled programs.

Most users will average upgrade times lasting just a few hours, but those with slower systems or exceptional amounts of data will have to set aside a good portion of the day just for the automated process. All clean install systems upgraded in around 40 minutes or less.

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  • 20 hours? were they using a floppy?
    32
  • any "upgrade" is an ugly messy way to get windows installed - dump that *** and format the dam thing and get a decent fresh install onto that system
    28
  • Other Comments
  • 20 hours? were they using a floppy?
    32
  • any "upgrade" is an ugly messy way to get windows installed - dump that *** and format the dam thing and get a decent fresh install onto that system
    28
  • Certainly 20 hours would be a max? That is, if there are many, many programs, games, files, folders, drivers, registry entries, right? I'm using RC7 now and can only determine that Adobe and RC7 don't get along. The beta's of AV software work ok, other than the expiration dates. DirectX 11 not recognized by many graphics cards, so Dumbdown seems to be the way to go. 20 hours, huh. I've done clean installs, including several programs, games, etc, in no more than 6-7 worst case scenario, never upgraded, so it makes me wonder what MS did to arrive at the scary 20 hour number.
    1