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ARM Preps Entry In 64-bit Server Market

By - Source: ARM | B 20 comments

ARM has just disclosed the first information about its ARMv8 architecture at its ARM TechCon 2011 conference.

ARMv8 will succeed ARMv7, which is the foundation for current processors such as the Cortex-A9 and Cortex-A15. What makes ARMv8 special is the addition of a new "A64" 64-bit instruction set, which will enable the company to move much more aggressively into the server and enterprise computing space.

ARM's new processors will feature both 32-bit and 64-bit (AArch32 and AArch64) execution states.

"With our increasingly connected world, the market for 32-bit processing continues to expand and evolve creating new opportunities for 32-bit ARMv7 based processors in embedded, real-time and open application platforms." said Mike Muller, CTO of ARM. "We believe the ARMv8 architecture is ideally suited to enable the ARM partnership to continue to grow in 32-bit application spaces and bring diverse, innovative and energy-efficient solutions to 64-bit processing markets."

ARM specifically referred to servers as a new application area for its products, which may raise some interest at Intel. It appears that ARM will take its time with this effort and said that it has begun building an ecosystem around its 64-bit instruction set. the company said it will disclose the first ARMv8 processors in 2012, but it does not expect systems using these chips to appear until 2014. Initial support for open source OS support is apparently in the works at this time.

However, it is particularly interesting that ARM was able to score not only high-profile quotes from AppliedMicro and Nvidia in its press release, but also a quote from Microsoft, which appears to be participating in this effort was also quoted: "ARM is an important partner for Microsoft," a statement attributed to KD Hallman, general manager at Microsoft reads. "The evolution of ARM to support a 64-bit architecture is a significant development for ARM and for the ARM ecosystem. We look forward to witnessing this technology's potential to enhance future ARM-based solutions."

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  • 13 Hide
    digiex , November 1, 2011 7:38 PM
    ARMed and ready, hope it will survive the battle field.
Other Comments
  • 13 Hide
    digiex , November 1, 2011 7:38 PM
    ARMed and ready, hope it will survive the battle field.
  • -4 Hide
    captaincharisma , November 1, 2011 7:44 PM
    otacon72Maybe ARM will be able to challenge intel at some point since AMD is a lost cause.


    with how bad bulldozer turned out to be ARM would have a good chance of taking the number 2 spot in the CPU race
  • -4 Hide
    saturnus , November 1, 2011 7:45 PM
    Projected raw processing power per core, clock to clock = Ivy Bridge based Xeon x3
    2 to 128 cores on a single SoC (Server On a Chip) with integrated I/O
    Down to 300mW idle power for the entire SoC

    Intel (and AMD). Hell has just frozen over. Game over!
  • 6 Hide
    cheepstuff , November 1, 2011 8:46 PM
    That battle between ARM and Intel that we have been waiting for is finally starting. This should be exciting.
  • 4 Hide
    julianbautista87 , November 1, 2011 8:57 PM
    stop saying that AMD is dead. I mean, come on, they are doing well in the gpu and apu market, and they have a small but millionaire share in the desktop and server market.

    People used to say the same about Apple like 12 years ago (when PC overwhelmed them) and look at them now.


    It's nice that ARM is entering the server market. I hope they enter the desktop market as well, competition is good for the economy.
  • 1 Hide
    cmartin011 , November 1, 2011 9:08 PM
    investors get your money ready!
  • 4 Hide
    alidan , November 1, 2011 9:33 PM
    julianbautista87stop saying that AMD is dead. I mean, come on, they are doing well in the gpu and apu market, and they have a small but millionaire share in the desktop and server market. People used to say the same about Apple like 12 years ago (when PC overwhelmed them) and look at them now.It's nice that ARM is entering the server market. I hope they enter the desktop market as well, competition is good for the economy.


    ... they became a music than phone company and finally made money?
  • 1 Hide
    Anonymous , November 1, 2011 9:50 PM
    Forgive my ignorance, but what does ARM-64 have that MIPS-64 doesn't? I mean, I know MIPS64 is old, but what is the advantage of ARM designs? Is ARM just being more aggressive with ISA and microarchitecture improvements?
  • 1 Hide
    WR2 , November 1, 2011 9:55 PM
    Arm strong in every market? No bad news there.
  • 0 Hide
    memadmax , November 1, 2011 10:00 PM
    This outta be interesting.

    But can a smartphone builder be a real contender with the bigboys in the server market?

    We'll see.
  • 1 Hide
    memadmax , November 1, 2011 10:04 PM
    Yea, as someone else mentioned.

    Apple only lives because of the phone/gadget market, not computers.. They can't even pwn the laptop segments...

    Apple for all intents and purposes is now a phone maker. The dream of apple taking over the pc market died long ago... and that is, was, and forever will be their undoing(proprietary, unwilling to open the hardware/OS)

  • 0 Hide
    tofu2go , November 1, 2011 10:07 PM
    Does anyone else think that ARM could actually be a bigger threat to AMD then Intel? Intel's niche is mainstream performance computing. ARM's is mobile devices. ARM will gradually scale up in performance, while Intel will scale down for mobile. Where does that leave AMD? Somewhere in the middle where it will be crushed on two fronts? Or perhaps HPC with its emphasis on extreme parallel processing? On that front, AMD would have compete with IBM's Power architecture.

    AMD unable to compete with Intel on raw processing power is trying to change the game by focusing on integration between CPU and GPU. Well Nvidia is doing the same, but doing it with ARM. The Tegra's got multiple, low power ARM cores paired with Nvidia GPU technology. As ARM scales up, what will AMD be left with?

    For now, ARM and x86 are kept separated by desktop vs mobile operating systems... but just wait... when Microsoft releases Windows and Office for ARM, and Apple starts putting ARM into Macbooks...
  • -1 Hide
    kronos_cornelius , November 2, 2011 1:38 AM
    I think leaving backward compatibility in is a mistake. dump 32-bit and go straight 64-bits !
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , November 2, 2011 2:59 AM
    Apple isn't putting ARM into MacBooks. They dumped PowerPC for a reason. ARM is still a very SLOW processor. Going 64-bit doesn't ensure them entry into a MacBook nor does it mean it will become a powerful server architecture. What they can do is low power and a low power data center that saves customers money could be a big deal. I know MS nudged Intel about building a 128 core ATOM CPU that would solve a lot of their power issues. With news like this, I'm sure Intel is listening now.

    The issue will become though do you save on power while greatly losing IPC. In 2014, Intel will be running 14nm Tri-gate technology on both ATOM rebranded and the next x86 technology. Both of those CPUs are SURE to be strong. The 14nm ATOM will have super low power and it will have a greatly improved IPC, plus greatly improved integrated graphics. The next x86 technology will be a great deal faster than what we're expecting with Ivy Bridge.

    Despite this news from ARM, 2014 will be a tough market to crack for them as low performing processors may take it on the chin.
  • 1 Hide
    de5_Roy , November 2, 2011 3:18 AM
    afaik arm licences their tech out to other companies that make chips.
    intel vs amd vs arm(whoever makes arm server chips) would be interesting.
    people who are bashing bulldozer should note that bulldozer server cpus i.e. interlagos and valencia are slightly different from the desktop dud(zambezi) they released.
    xeon cpus may be more powerful that amd's opterons, but they're also costlier.
    people would choose whatever tech is cheaper to build servers. iirc some people built servers from ps3/ps2 because of their tech. some built servers using atom cpus too.
  • 0 Hide
    shreeharsha , November 2, 2011 6:27 AM
    This will be British tech vs US tech
  • -1 Hide
    ojas , November 2, 2011 12:31 PM
    shreeharshaThis will be British tech vs US tech


    Er...no...at least half the ppl at intel are Asian...don't know about ARM, though it's sort of likely...so both companies are pretty much multi-cultural...

    Though, yeah, I mean Intel is an American company, and ARM is British, but their tech is certainly not....
  • 0 Hide
    captaincharisma , November 2, 2011 3:33 PM
    Quote:
    stop saying that AMD is dead. I mean, come on, they are doing well in the gpu and apu market, and they have a small but millionaire share in the desktop and server market.

    People used to say the same about Apple like 12 years ago (when PC overwhelmed them) and look at them now.


    It's nice that ARM is entering the server market. I hope they enter the desktop market as well, competition is good for the economy.


    AMD is not dead but the way they are these days they are on a verge of dying. if ARM is able to come out with a CPU better than any AMD (which wouldn't be that hard) and able to make the CPU's cheaper then AMD's dollar store CPU's then they are finished :bounce: 
  • 0 Hide
    captaincharisma , November 2, 2011 3:34 PM
    Quote:
    I think leaving backward compatibility in is a mistake. dump 32-bit and go straight 64-bits !





    tell that to almost every business in the world and see what they say
  • 0 Hide
    Cazalan , November 2, 2011 6:42 PM
    tofu2goDoes anyone else think that ARM could actually be a bigger threat to AMD then Intel?



    That could be good or bad for AMD. They ARE getting pinched between ARM and Intel. However the monopoly status would no longer apply and Intel could buy AMD for their graphics.