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Intel Releases Two New Atoms for NAS Devices

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 21 comments

Intel getting NAS-ty!

While we still associate the Intel Atom with being the overwhelmingly popular netbook CPU, it's got more applications than just for tiny portables.

The Atom's being doing well inside networked storage appliances and Intel this week has added two new Atom processors to further boost the company’s offerings to its OEM partners Acer, Cisco, LaCie, LG Electronics, Netgear, QNAP, Super Micro, Synology and Thecus.

For consumer electronics, Intel is introducing the 1.8GHz Atom processor D425 single-core and D525 dual-core with support for DDR3 SODIMM.

The new Intel Atom processors (D425 and D525) are paired with the Intel 82801 IR I/O Controller and support Microsoft Windows Home Server and open source Linux operating systems.

“Networked storage appliances based on the Intel Atom processor platform enable consumers and businesses to organize, manage, protect and share documents, photos, videos and music throughout the home or office,” said Dinesh Rao, product line manager, Intel Storage Group. “The versatile Atom processor, which is at the heart of a growing variety of small, innovative, Internet-connected devices, makes it possible for storage vendors to develop low-power appliances that can innocuously sit on a desk or shelf while keeping digital content safe and available anytime, anywhere.”

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Top Comments
  • 22 Hide
    WyomingKnott , August 18, 2010 12:55 PM
    D425 and D525 are boring names. Call them "Hydrogen" and "Helium," as in "I just bought a netbook with a helium atom in it."
Other Comments
  • 22 Hide
    WyomingKnott , August 18, 2010 12:55 PM
    D425 and D525 are boring names. Call them "Hydrogen" and "Helium," as in "I just bought a netbook with a helium atom in it."
  • 7 Hide
    mavroxur , August 18, 2010 1:13 PM
    WyomingKnottD425 and D525 are boring names. Call them "Hydrogen" and "Helium," as in "I just bought a netbook with a helium atom in it."


    I have to agree. It would be cool to see them adopt element names to denote different models.

    "Plutonium Inside"

    :-)
  • Display all 21 comments.
  • -7 Hide
    r0x0r , August 18, 2010 1:28 PM
    Atoms running a full OS are slow as hell, but I wonder how these would run android (hint hint put it in a phone).

  • 1 Hide
    nevertell , August 18, 2010 1:37 PM
    r0x0rAtoms running a full OS are slow as hell, but I wonder how these would run android (hint hint put it in a phone).
    Why android ? It runs good in a netbook oriented linux distro.
  • 0 Hide
    burnley14 , August 18, 2010 1:37 PM
    r0x0rAtoms running a full OS are slow as hell, but I wonder how these would run android (hint hint put it in a phone).


    There were rumors a while back about Intel designing chips for devices like phones and such. It was a modified atom-like chip with a super low TDP that would make cell phones and such much more powerful.
  • 2 Hide
    ctbaars , August 18, 2010 1:41 PM
    r0x0rAtoms running a full OS are slow as hell, but I wonder how these would run android (hint hint put it in a phone).
    I don't understand what you're trying to say ...
  • -1 Hide
    mouettus , August 18, 2010 1:46 PM
    are they fast enough for 1080p muxing down to ps3?
  • 2 Hide
    ubergeek , August 18, 2010 1:49 PM
    I've been using an atom board for my home NAS for a long time already. D945GCLF2 with a raid controller.
  • 2 Hide
    zdzichu , August 18, 2010 2:20 PM
    Intel needs to put AES-NI in Atoms to make them usable for NAS.
  • -1 Hide
    deadly4u , August 18, 2010 2:49 PM
    Ewwww, thaaat's NAS-ty.
  • 0 Hide
    madass , August 18, 2010 3:15 PM
    mavroxurI have to agree. It would be cool to see them adopt element names to denote different models. "Plutonium Inside":-)

    NVidia GTX Plutonium?
    Should grill the same way.....
  • 2 Hide
    cablechewer , August 18, 2010 4:59 PM
    Quote:
    "Plutonium Inside"


    That would be great on my next trip through customs. Might get a lot more than the rubber glove treatment.
  • 2 Hide
    jimmysmitty , August 18, 2010 6:16 PM
    burnley14There were rumors a while back about Intel designing chips for devices like phones and such. It was a modified atom-like chip with a super low TDP that would make cell phones and such much more powerful.


    Not just rumors. The next gen Atom for smart phones is in the works. Its based off the one thats able to do full 080P encode/decode. Has independant power planes for each part such as music, video and phone features.
  • 1 Hide
    mlopinto2k1 , August 18, 2010 10:44 PM
    burnley14There were rumors a while back about Intel designing chips for devices like phones and such. It was a modified atom-like chip with a super low TDP that would make cell phones and such much more powerful.
    Rumors? I thought Intel was doing this for sure? They had an article, right here on Tom's.
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , August 18, 2010 10:58 PM
    its funny they compare those two in size to a coin im sure most people (i know i dont) do not recognize, so those coin and processors could be the size of texas... but we wouldnt know it :/ 
  • 0 Hide
    dEAne , August 19, 2010 2:29 AM
    wow what could be next. . .
  • 0 Hide
    archange , August 19, 2010 8:24 AM
    Well, I have to say, for an inexpensive low-end server / NAS, Atoms make a LOT of sense. I've just set up one of these:

    http://www.asus.com/product.aspx?P_ID=dCuSHhM0xDkhj7v0

    Runs CentOS 5.5 x64 with 4 GB of RAM and provides me with:

    - Samba storage
    - Torrenting
    - Routing
    - Full featured Apache web server
    - Mail server, webmail
    - FTP
    - TeamSpeak 3 Server
    - DNS

    And a ton of other functionalities related to Web Services. Not bad for a tiny in-order dual core which draws 35 W fully equipped. (I still run it from a cheapo 450 W PSU, so power will drop even more with an adequate, efficient unit).

    What reason would I need to buy more power hungry equipment? Well, none, except for maybe opening up an ISP business. And even then, you could find some use for low end Atom-based dedicated servers.
  • 0 Hide
    liquidsnake718 , August 19, 2010 9:16 AM
    NOt bad for a home server, they should come out with a 1.8ghz dual core atom which can handle that and a live antivirus software and firewall for that network.
  • 0 Hide
    akorzan , August 19, 2010 5:19 PM
    r0x0rAtoms running a full OS are slow as hell, but I wonder how these would run android (hint hint put it in a phone).

    What he is trying to say is that the original atoms were really meant for ultra portable PCs, (UMPC) a hand held phone like computer with more kick than a regular smart phone. They were not really designed for low power and cheap laptops or now called netbooks.
    The original atom was rather slow and could not even playback 720p video very well.
    Now they are much better and as seen in Toms Hardware recent p4 vs atom, the dual core atom flat out beats a 3.0 GHz P4 while using less power.
    If you want overall system responsiveness on the older atoms than go with linux. Even the original Asus Eee PC before the atom used linux and a celeron m at 800 Mhz.

    But don't kid yourself the atom is not for Photoshop, Seti@Home, number crunching, or Crysis.
  • 1 Hide
    eddieroolz , August 20, 2010 3:50 AM
    mavroxurI have to agree. It would be cool to see them adopt element names to denote different models. "Plutonium Inside":-)


    Kim Jong-Il might want to get a hold of that!
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