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Acer to Launch Chrome OS Devices in June

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 15 comments

Computex is just a couple of weeks away and the rumors about upcoming product announcements are just starting to trickle in. Leading the way are reports that Acer will début its Chrome OS devices at the show.

VentureBeat cites multiple sources that say Acer will launch Chrome OS devices in Taiwan next month. How many devices or what kind of devices the company plans to show us remains unclear. However, Google's Chrome OS is supposed to be a lightweight operating system for netbooks and (eventually) tablets so hearing the company is going to announce more than one device suggests we could see an Acer tablet next month.

While a Chrome OS tablet from Acer is possible, the company has already said it has plans for Android netbooks. Given that Android is already optimized for touchscreens, logical thinking says it's more likely we'll see Android tablets than Chrome OS tablets. Still, it's nice to dream.

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  • 5 Hide
    insider3 , May 14, 2010 6:11 PM
    I don't know if any of you guys ever owned an Acer product..But they make some pretty low quality stuff. Looks like every manufacturer is hopping on the tablet market. Just waiting on Lenovo now.
  • 9 Hide
    husker , May 14, 2010 6:12 PM
    But will it... aw nevermind.
  • 4 Hide
    jacobdrj , May 14, 2010 6:20 PM
    insider3I don't know if any of you guys ever owned an Acer product..But they make some pretty low quality stuff. Looks like every manufacturer is hopping on the tablet market. Just waiting on Lenovo now.

    I agree some of their stuff is pretty bad, but some of their stuff is good too. Their netbooks are very well built. Not as well built as the ASUS' but still good. And the problems that I have seen with their laptops are no worse than the consumer grade HP stuff.

    Acer's monitors are just fine. Some of them are just ok, but they are always decent, and some are even great.
  • 1 Hide
    Anonymous , May 14, 2010 6:44 PM
    Android is just stick to tablets and phones while Chrome OS should be on netbooks. It seems like a waste of effort to change Android to work on a netbook while Chrome OS is going to compete with it. Of course for the average consumer who might just not know the android is a google product might see it as healthy competition.
  • 2 Hide
    builderbobftw , May 14, 2010 6:52 PM
    Quote:
    Why would Google have 2 OS, like ChromeOS and Android?

    Isn't that a bit redundant?


    That's like sayign that having an apple makes an orange redundant becuase they are both fruits.
  • 0 Hide
    builderbobftw , May 14, 2010 7:02 PM
    Quote:
    You were fast to criticize, but didn't give me an actual answer.


    here ya go mate:

    http://www.businessweek.com/technology/content/jul2009/tc2009079_065270.htm
  • 0 Hide
    builderbobftw , May 14, 2010 7:14 PM
    ^ Chrome is a browser.

    I was under the impression that the OS in ChromeOS stood for Operting System.
  • 2 Hide
    njalterio , May 14, 2010 7:47 PM
    OK n00bs listen up.

    There is Chrome the browser, and there is Chrome the operating system. Both are made by Google. The browser is for desktops and laptops, and the OS is for tablets and netbooks.

    There is also Android the operating system, which is also made by Google. This OS is for smart phones.
  • 0 Hide
    kelemvor4 , May 14, 2010 7:56 PM
    SmochinaBecause neither are real OSes. Sure, Android is Linux based, but what's the point of having such a nice base when you are not allowing developers to write programs that'll run in native code and restrict them to java...And chrome os... that's just a browser actually, nothing more.

    Doesn't that make it more of a linux distribution? Like debian, or slackware, or lindows, or redhat or... whatever.

    I think the java code restriction is a good move. Keeps the system stable without placing hardly any restrictions on what a developer can do, and at the same time keeps costs down for Google since the java platform is already available and free.

    The best thing about a chrome or linux based netbook vs windows is you save several hundred bucks on the OS license. Netbooks don't have the hardware to run games so they shouldn't be a consideration. I think it's brilliant actually. Having said that - I don't have, need, or want a netbook. Maybe if I traveled more or something; but my current lifestyle doesn't warrant such a device.
  • 1 Hide
    Anonymous , May 14, 2010 8:09 PM
    Acer stuff ! Low quality ! ???
    Dude is the third poster HIGH ?
    or he just means HIGH QUALITY HP/COMPAQ STUFF WHICH DIES JUST AFTER WARRENTY IS EXPIRED.
    I have 2 acer notebooks and each of my friend has the same. NOT A SINGLE PROBLEM in one year.
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , May 14, 2010 8:52 PM
    I have to say Acer quality is okay, but not high.

    And don't bash HP. I still have a running laptop from them that is 6 years strong.

    As for the chrome os being implemented in devices, I wonder if the recent interest in the os has to do with the industry rushing to produce tablets. I think Google would take away the java limitations of android for chrome, but what else would change?
  • 1 Hide
    segio526 , May 14, 2010 9:06 PM
    SmochinaExcuse you? Java is the worst possible thing ever. Memory hungry, slow as hell. Yea, smart choice Google, and about stability, pffff.Let me give you a quote from John Carmack about a IDE made in Java "when a text editor is anything but instant on a 3 GHz machine..."


    I think your gripes are with the Java Virtual Machines, not Java itself. Android is highly optimized for Java, so it runs almost natively. I'm also guessing that you haven't actually used an Android phone. I have a Droid and the thing has been rock stable and speedy since I've owned it. I really don't see how a memory hungry and slow as hell OS could make it to market in this customer driven world, let alone gain more market share than the iPhone.

    As for the difference between Android and ChromeOS. ChromeOS, when you get down to it, is a web browser that runs at the hardware level. You turn on the computer and boom, you've got a web browser up instead of an OS loading screen and desktop. This browser is a bit more robust than a typical browser. It lets you run apps within it. It's almost entirely cloud based and doesn't really let you install stuff or save stuff to an internal HDD (I think the devices in the future will have something like 4GB SSDs), making a very niche OS for people who really only do stuff on the internet like web browsing and Google Docs and music/video streaming.
  • 0 Hide
    SAL-e , May 15, 2010 5:06 AM
    SmochinaBecause neither are real OSes. Sure, Android is Linux based, but what's the point of having such a nice base when you are not allowing developers to write programs that'll run in native code and restrict them to java...And chrome os... that's just a browser actually, nothing more.

    This is not 100% true. Especially for ChromeOS. First we don't know what ChromeOS would be when is done. The current staff floating around the Internet is ChromiumOS from several independent developers. Second, Google has already released beta of their native SDK for Chrome browser and I am sure that applications developed with native SDK will run on ChromeOS also. Many people speculate that ChromeOS will compete with Android, but I don't see it. I think Android will run low-end devices like smart phones and tablet similar to current iPad, but ChromeOS I think it will become standard for future netbooks and new powerful tablets running next generation x86 CPUs . Also I think Google is going to push the ChromeOS into Enterprise market as thin client.
  • 0 Hide
    JohnnyLucky , May 15, 2010 10:58 AM
    If multiple devices, then Acer is probably trying to cover a variety of possibilities.
  • -1 Hide
    Regulas , May 15, 2010 2:49 PM
    Bah, I'll stick with OS x and Ubuntu