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iBuyPower Launches OptiBoost Customization Program

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 3 comments

This program promises more laptop customization.

Image: iBuyPowerImage: iBuyPower

iBuyPower launched a new customization program called OptiBoost. Focused on notebooks, the company promises a deeper level of hardware configurations, similar to what is offered with gaming desktops. The first OEM to take part in this program is Gigabyte, who typically dishes out gaming notebooks "as is" – no modifying the system specs before purchase.

"This is going to be a game changer. As customers know more, they also demand more. And when you're serious about performance, you want to have things done your way. That's the whole idea behind OptiBoost," said Darren Su, vice president of iBuyPower.

The first on Gigabyte's list is the P34Gv2 with a starting price of $1399. This portable gaming rig includes a 14-inch screen (1920 x 1080), an Intel Core i7-4710HQ, 8 GB of DDR3-1600 memory, a Nvidia GTX 860M GPU with 4 GB of VRAM, and a 500 GB hard drive. Currently, the only customization options include memory (8 GB or 16 GB) and the primary and secondary HDD or SSD. Customers can also add an optical drive and change the internal wireless network adapter.

Next in line is the P35Gv2 with a starting price of $1439. This laptop includes a 15.6-inch display (1920 x 1080), an Intel Core i7-4710HQ, 8 GB of DDR3-1600 memory, Nvidia's GTX 860M (4 GB VRAM), and a 1 TB 7200RPM hard drive. Customers can configure the memory, the GPU, the primary and secondary drives, the swappable drive bay (optical, HDD or SDD), and the wireless component. Looking back, this laptop has a few more options than the cheaper P34Gv2.

Finally, we have the P35Wv2 for $1599, featuring a 15.6-inch screen (1920 x 1080), an Intel Core i7-4710HQ, 8 GB of DDR3-1600 memory, a Nvidia GTX 870M GPU (6 GB VRAM), and a 1 TB 7200RPM HDD. With this model, customers can change the memory, the GPU, the primary and secondary drives, the swappable drive bay, and the wireless component.

"Gigabyte is excited about cooperating with iBuyPower on the new OptiBoost program," said Vincent Liu, sales director at Gigabyte's notebook division. "Combining our leading edge gaming notebooks with the configurability and flexibility of the OptiBoost program will allow users to not only build a truly bespoke notebook, but to have exactly the system they need."

For more information about OptiBoost, head here. iBuyPower said the OptiBoost program will be expanding quickly, so stay tuned for more options.

Add your comment Display 3 Comments.
  • 0 Hide
    dovah-chan , May 27, 2014 7:15 AM
    I can change out my; optical drive, RAM, wireless adapter, HDD/SSD, keyboard, battery, and card reader with minimal effort on my Lenovo G505.

    So I can't change my GPU or CPU. So what? Lenovo is already running a similar program that is very similar with their ultrabay expansion slot. The only downside to it is that you can only buy products to put in the ultrabay that are made and custom-fitted by Lenovo.

    Until the advent of laptop CPU sockets that allow for interchangeable CPUs I don't see myself buying a gaming oriented laptop anytime soon. The price and performance ratio is just horrible on them and the price of mobility is not worth it.

    They suffer the same fate as every single laptop will. Sooner or later they're just going to be a poor man's desktop because the battery can't last 15 minutes without being charged. If you're trying to game on the go or want something easy to carry to the LAN party then you've probably missed the point of PC gaming as a whole.
  • 0 Hide
    Ninjawithagun , May 28, 2014 9:01 AM
    @ dovah-chan - You are so wrong in so many ways! A gaming laptop is primarily aimed at consumers who don't have the capability or luxury of toting a desktop gaming PC with them when traveling. They aren't missing the point at all. They know full well that buying a gaming laptop is not about investment or bang for the buck. It's about being able to game while on the road and away from their primary gaming PC. I am a perfect example of this. I am a PC tech and have a in-depth technical understanding in the differences between the desktop and mobile variants of computer systems. I own a $5000 gaming PC, but also own a $3000 Alienware 18 gaming laptop. There is no question which is more powerful or which one is the better buy for performance. I knew that when I bought my gaming laptop. I knew that I couldn't tote my $5K gaming system with me on business trips. If you want to include the limiting factor of budget, then yes I agree with you in that the money best spent is building your own gaming desktop system. However, if your budget allows and the necessity is there for someone to be able to game while on travel, buying a gaming laptop is a must. I had thought of using the game streaming services, but they all get bad reviews, and most of them have shutdown due to lack of interest. So, for now gaming laptops are about the only real solution for PC gamers on the go.
  • 0 Hide
    dovah-chan , May 28, 2014 11:01 AM
    Quote:
    @ dovah-chan - You are so wrong in so many ways! A gaming laptop is primarily aimed at consumers who don't have the capability or luxury of toting a desktop gaming PC with them when traveling. They aren't missing the point at all. They know full well that buying a gaming laptop is not about investment or bang for the buck. It's about being able to game while on the road and away from their primary gaming PC. I am a perfect example of this. I am a PC tech and have a in-depth technical understanding in the differences between the desktop and mobile variants of computer systems. I own a $5000 gaming PC, but also own a $3000 Alienware 18 gaming laptop. There is no question which is more powerful or which one is the better buy for performance. I knew that when I bought my gaming laptop. I knew that I couldn't tote my $5K gaming system with me on business trips. If you want to include the limiting factor of budget, then yes I agree with you in that the money best spent is building your own gaming desktop system. However, if your budget allows and the necessity is there for someone to be able to game while on travel, buying a gaming laptop is a must. I had thought of using the game streaming services, but they all get bad reviews, and most of them have shutdown due to lack of interest. So, for now gaming laptops are about the only real solution for PC gamers on the go.


    I'm just speaking the voice of most gamers who are on the platform. Although I love PC and I'm certainly infatuated with hardware I am not a PC enthusiast or a console enthusiast. I am a person who just likes to play games.

    But I guess I didn't look at it from all the angles though. What a platform means to someone varies from person to person. To me just sitting at my desk with the window open and a zephyr rolling in during a bright and luminous day is what I imagine when I see myself enjoying my computing experience. That is probably very different from what other people think. I'm sorry I just blatantly went out and said that when I should have thought about how other people feel.
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