Microsoft Disagrees With 'Clumsy' Criticisms

Yesterday former Microsoft VP Dick Brass wrote an opinion piece for the New York Times calling the software giant a "clumsy, uncompetitive innovator."

Frank X. Shaw, Microsoft corporate VP of communications, responded (and disagreeing) in the official Microsoft blog by touching upon points brought up by Brass.

"At the highest level, we think about innovation in relation to its ability to have a positive impact in the world. For Microsoft, it is not sufficient to simply have a good idea, or a great idea, or even a cool idea," Shaw wrote. "We measure our work by its broad impact."

To highlight his point, Shaw said that ClearType now ships with every copy of Windows and is installed on around a billion PCs around the world.

"This is a great example of innovation with impact: innovation at scale," Shaw states. "Now, you could argue that this should have happened faster. And sometimes it does. But for a company whose products touch vast numbers of people, what matters is innovation at scale, not just innovation at speed."

Shaw pointed to Microsoft's OneNote product as being "essentially created for the Tablet and is a key part of Office today."

Shaw also rejected Brass's assessment of that Xbox being an equal contender in the game console business: "Fact is, Xbox 360 was the first high-definition console. It was the first to digitally deliver games, music, TV shows and movies in 1080p high definition. The first to bring Facebook and Twitter to the living room."

Read the original report on Dick Brass's criticisms here.

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  • randomizer
    ClearType reaching a billion PCs is not even related to innovation. That's called a monopoly on a product. Is IE6 innovative because for the longest time it's been installed on more PCs than any other browser?

    MS is a pathetic innovator, just as all big software companies (and indeed most companies in every market) are. They rely on patenting the whole world so that they can sit on their existing products' success and keep out the competition through lawsuits. True innovation comes from sharing ideas freely, not locking them up in a complex web of restrictive licences and closed-source programming.
    15
  • duckmanx88
    "The first to bring Facebook and Twitter to the living room."

    my laptop has done this for a very long time. as well as many televisions.
    13
  • Other Comments
  • deadlockedworld
    I read that article. It was good.. spot on. I would think he knows what hes talking about.
    8
  • Zoidman
    I too read the article, and one point Brass brought up, that I've heard a lot tricking through about Microsoft having incredibly hostile internal dynamics. What I mean is one sector often works against another in order to ensure their product reigns supreme, even if the other product is in fact superior.
    4
  • randomizer
    ClearType reaching a billion PCs is not even related to innovation. That's called a monopoly on a product. Is IE6 innovative because for the longest time it's been installed on more PCs than any other browser?

    MS is a pathetic innovator, just as all big software companies (and indeed most companies in every market) are. They rely on patenting the whole world so that they can sit on their existing products' success and keep out the competition through lawsuits. True innovation comes from sharing ideas freely, not locking them up in a complex web of restrictive licences and closed-source programming.
    15