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Samsung Intros 80 MB/s Memory Cards

By - Source: Samsung | B 15 comments

Samsung has announced new high-speed, high-capacity SD and microSD memory cards.

The new flagship "Pro Series" delivers write speeds of up to 20 MB/s (microSD) and 40 MB/s (SD), as well as read speeds of up to 70 MB/s (microSD) and 80 MB/s (SD). According to Samsung, the memory cards are rated shock proof at up to 3,200 lbs and magnet proof up to 10,000 gauss.

The SD Pro Series is available in 16, 32 and 64 GB capacities and carries suggested retail pricing of $70, $120, and $240. The same pricing applies to the microSD Pro Series, but Samsung also offers an 8 GB version that sells for $40.

The company also updated its mid-range Extreme Speed series (up to 48 MB/s read and write speeds), which is priced from $23 for a 8 GB cards to $75 for 32 GB versions. The mainstream series (up to 24 MB/s read and write speeds) starts at $13 for 4GB cards and lands at $70 for the 32 GB models.

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  • 16 Hide
    drwho1 , October 26, 2012 2:16 AM
    ttg_avengedLOL aren't flash drives still MUCH faster? I guess this is good for phones, and tablets. That's about it.

    and probably camcorders, SLR cameras....
  • 13 Hide
    CaedenV , October 26, 2012 2:40 AM
    ttg_avengedLOL aren't flash drives still MUCH faster? I guess this is good for phones, and tablets. That's about it.

    um... no.
    Consumer SD cards and flash drives use similar tech which typically gets somewhere between 5-15MB/s.
    Higher end cards and flash drives can max out USB2 at 20-25MB/s, and that is about as fast as you can get on SD cards (until now)
    USB3 flash drives are faster than USB2, but still not anywhere near the theoretical throughput of the interface, and typically much slower than even cheap SSDs, having a throughput somewhere in the 40-60MB/s range, so this new SD card shoudl meet or beat that.

    Personally I have an nice little HD camera which takes SD card media, and I have not been able to find cards fast enough to shoot uncompressed 1080p (or even 720p) video with it. It does great with PNY Pro cards for doing lightly compressed footage, but I bet if I feed it one of these I could get the full glory that my camera is capable of.
  • 12 Hide
    willard , October 26, 2012 2:31 AM
    Those are some crazy fast SD cards, with a price to match.
Other Comments
  • 16 Hide
    drwho1 , October 26, 2012 2:16 AM
    ttg_avengedLOL aren't flash drives still MUCH faster? I guess this is good for phones, and tablets. That's about it.

    and probably camcorders, SLR cameras....
  • 9 Hide
    _Cubase_ , October 26, 2012 2:17 AM
    ttg_avengedLOL aren't flash drives still MUCH faster?


    Thanks professor.
  • 12 Hide
    willard , October 26, 2012 2:31 AM
    Those are some crazy fast SD cards, with a price to match.
  • 13 Hide
    CaedenV , October 26, 2012 2:40 AM
    ttg_avengedLOL aren't flash drives still MUCH faster? I guess this is good for phones, and tablets. That's about it.

    um... no.
    Consumer SD cards and flash drives use similar tech which typically gets somewhere between 5-15MB/s.
    Higher end cards and flash drives can max out USB2 at 20-25MB/s, and that is about as fast as you can get on SD cards (until now)
    USB3 flash drives are faster than USB2, but still not anywhere near the theoretical throughput of the interface, and typically much slower than even cheap SSDs, having a throughput somewhere in the 40-60MB/s range, so this new SD card shoudl meet or beat that.

    Personally I have an nice little HD camera which takes SD card media, and I have not been able to find cards fast enough to shoot uncompressed 1080p (or even 720p) video with it. It does great with PNY Pro cards for doing lightly compressed footage, but I bet if I feed it one of these I could get the full glory that my camera is capable of.
  • -2 Hide
    PTNLemay , October 26, 2012 3:51 AM
    Hmmm... Call me crazy, but if it's more than 1 dollar per GB, I ain't buying.
  • 9 Hide
    freggo , October 26, 2012 4:10 AM
    PTNLemayHmmm... Call me crazy, but if it's more than 1 dollar per GB, I ain't buying.


    Prius vs. Porsche... Speed = $$$$ :-)
  • 2 Hide
    freggo , October 26, 2012 4:11 AM
    caedenv I have an nice little HD camera which takes SD card media, and I have not been able to find cards fast enough to shoot uncompressed 1080p (or even 720p) video with it. It does great with PNY Pro cards for doing lightly compressed footage, but I bet if I feed it one of these I could get the full glory that my camera is capable of.


    Which camera would that be; have similar problems with a Panasonic SD900 series.

  • 3 Hide
    Anonymous , October 26, 2012 4:17 AM
    Ummm... My 16GB Sandisk Class 10 card claims 95MB/s read speed. I've had transfers from it sustained at 85MB/s over USB3.0. The write speed is about 60MB/s. After a day of shooting 12MP images in RAW, the difference is huge. That same card only performed at 20MB/s when connected to a USB2.0 reader.
  • 0 Hide
    alidan , October 26, 2012 10:34 AM
    i have a question....

    is there any reason we dont have ssd speeds on these yet?

    i mean maybe special cards, but why cant we standard ize a controller, than implement that controller into the adaptors, sure, they wont have to much support at first, but over time... you would have a great ecosystem, and fast as hell memory
  • 0 Hide
    EDVINASM , October 26, 2012 11:11 AM
    caedenvum... no.Consumer SD cards and flash drives use similar tech which typically gets somewhere between 5-15MB/s.Higher end cards and flash drives can max out USB2 at 20-25MB/s, and that is about as fast as you can get on SD cards (until now)USB3 flash drives are faster than USB2, but still not anywhere near the theoretical throughput of the interface, and typically much slower than even cheap SSDs, having a throughput somewhere in the 40-60MB/s range, so this new SD card shoudl meet or beat that.Personally I have an nice little HD camera which takes SD card media, and I have not been able to find cards fast enough to shoot uncompressed 1080p (or even 720p) video with it. It does great with PNY Pro cards for doing lightly compressed footage, but I bet if I feed it one of these I could get the full glory that my camera is capable of.


    There might be heat issues trying to output uncompressed 1080p into some internal card. However, HDMI of your camera (if it is as good as you claim) should output full uncompressed stream that you can capture with a PC card and use RAID array or fast HDD/SSD to store it live.
  • 0 Hide
    rosen380 , October 26, 2012 3:00 PM
    I think a big difference with an SSD vs these is that the SSDs typically have eight memory chips that can each be read and written to in parallel. Maybe if you set up eight SD cards in a RAID 10, you'd get similar results as an SSD, but why not just use the SSD [cheaper and simpler]?
  • 1 Hide
    BulkZerker , October 26, 2012 3:01 PM
    EDVINASMThere might be heat issues trying to output uncompressed 1080p into some internal card. However, HDMI of your camera (if it is as good as you claim) should output full uncompressed stream that you can capture with a PC card and use RAID array or fast HDD/SSD to store it live.


    All fine and great if you can have it all set up and ready to go. I figure he wants to do it for those sudden moments when you Need the camera out right now. And wants the footage as high quality as possible
  • 1 Hide
    willard , October 26, 2012 3:56 PM
    alidani have a question....is there any reason we dont have ssd speeds on these yet?i mean maybe special cards, but why cant we standard ize a controller, than implement that controller into the adaptors, sure, they wont have to much support at first, but over time... you would have a great ecosystem, and fast as hell memory

    What you propose will turn $5 card readers into $50 card readers. Devices using SD cards, like phones, cameras, tablets, etc. will also see a huge jump in price because they also need that controller. You've also got the problem of, you know, the millions of devices that already exist that would never be able to make use of this technology. People would have to buy new devices to take advantage of it.

    Never going to happen. The market has shown over and over again that price is king, and telling people to upgrade their devices to use new technology gets met with vitriolic hatred. Just look at how people reacted to not being able to use fifteen year old printers on Windows Vista x64.

    Even the switch from DVD to Blu-ray was painful and expensive, and a lot of people still haven't made the switch. Even though Blu-rays don't cost much more than DVDs and can store 30GB+ of data it has met huge resistance because people have to update their equipment. People are never going to throw out hundreds or thousands of dollars in equipment to buy new equipment that's more expensive than what they already had, just so they can get faster SD card speeds. That kind of decision makes sense to maybe one in ten thousand people. There's just no market for it.

    Really, this problem has already been solved by other technologies. High end cameras, where you'd need this kind of thing, just use SSDs instead of SD cards.
  • 0 Hide
    alidan , October 27, 2012 5:14 AM
    willardWhat you propose will turn $5 card readers into $50 card readers. Devices using SD cards, like phones, cameras, tablets, etc. will also see a huge jump in price because they also need that controller. You've also got the problem of, you know, the millions of devices that already exist that would never be able to make use of this technology. People would have to buy new devices to take advantage of it.Never going to happen. The market has shown over and over again that price is king, and telling people to upgrade their devices to use new technology gets met with vitriolic hatred. Just look at how people reacted to not being able to use fifteen year old printers on Windows Vista x64. Even the switch from DVD to Blu-ray was painful and expensive, and a lot of people still haven't made the switch. Even though Blu-rays don't cost much more than DVDs and can store 30GB+ of data it has met huge resistance because people have to update their equipment. People are never going to throw out hundreds or thousands of dollars in equipment to buy new equipment that's more expensive than what they already had, just so they can get faster SD card speeds. That kind of decision makes sense to maybe one in ten thousand people. There's just no market for it.Really, this problem has already been solved by other technologies. High end cameras, where you'd need this kind of thing, just use SSDs instead of SD cards.


    who ever said you had to throw out your current cards and equipment?

    it may just be me, but expecting a new camera, brand new, made today, and expect it to use a 512mb sd card, or lets go all other card brands, just sounds stupid.

    i would love to know what kind of a premium a ssd has, so i know the memory, but saying it would go from 5$ to 50, thats kind of stupid.

    bluray isnt catching on because we also have digital means of getting video, if it was the same back when dvd came out, it would have taken quite a bit to get us to do it than to. i prefer bluray to digital, but i also wont watch a movie with bad sound or video because that can ruin it for me.