Thermaltake, Nvidia Jointly Launch Gaming Case

While stopping over at Thermaltake's suite, we noticed a custom designed case with an Nvidia logo on the front.

Although not fancy, the case delivers an efficient layout with one specialty: dedicated air channeling for Nvidia's upcoming Fermi-based graphics cards.

Called the Element V Nvidia Edition, the case has multiple large intake fans, as well as a specialized cooling duct that would partially cover the ends of Fermi cards. Thermaltake told us that this way, a dedicated intake fan will draw in cool air from the outside and direct the air flow right into the intakes of installed cards. Designed for multiple graphics cards, Thermaltake told us that Nvidia officially recommends the use of Fermi-certified cases when running multiple cards.

On the side sits a large panel fan and the are fans on the top of the case that help draw hot air out of the system too. We asked if "Nvidia Edition" cases are going to be available from other vendors and were told that for now, Thermaltake is the only maker.

Availability will be at the end of Feburary/early March and will retail for $179 USD.

Check out the photos for details!

More on CES 2010

Create a new thread in the US News comments forum about this subject
This thread is closed for comments
23 comments
    Your comment
    Top Comments
  • Anonymous
    "Thermaltake told us that Nvidia officially recommends the use of Fermi-certified cases when running multiple cards."

    "We asked if "Nvidia Edition" cases are going to be available from other vendors and were told that for now, Thermaltake is the only maker."

    Notice the distinction between "Nvidia Edition" and "Fermi-certified". All the high-end cases are going to be "Fermi-certified"; Thermaltake have just paid a bit extra for the badge. If memory serves, weren't Coolermaster producing "Nvidia Edition" cases in 2008?

    "Fermi-certified" is a point of interest, and I wonder if detractors won't pick up on that. Does Fermi SLI run so hot that it needs a special case?

    Just how strongly should we interpret "recommends"? In the sense that you might recommend a good restaurant, or are we looking at a Vista "recommended hardware" situation? If existing mid- and high-end cases aren't certified retrospectively, how much confidence will gamers and enthusiasts be able to place in their rigs?
    12
  • brendano257
    Well, I see they've prepared for their cards to run hot, although reducing the heat output is better than increasing the cooling input. Kind of a cheat-around the problem. And not everyone will buy a new case either obviously.
    11
  • Other Comments
  • Anonymous
    another reason why fermi is going to fail. it runs absurdly hot and no one in their right mind would buy a card that requires such specialized cooling to properly work. this should be the final nail in the coffin for fermi it will be overprices, power hungry, scorching hot and behind the ball. to sum it up nvidia failed.
    -9
  • brendano257
    Well, I see they've prepared for their cards to run hot, although reducing the heat output is better than increasing the cooling input. Kind of a cheat-around the problem. And not everyone will buy a new case either obviously.
    11
  • Anonymous
    "Thermaltake told us that Nvidia officially recommends the use of Fermi-certified cases when running multiple cards."

    "We asked if "Nvidia Edition" cases are going to be available from other vendors and were told that for now, Thermaltake is the only maker."

    Notice the distinction between "Nvidia Edition" and "Fermi-certified". All the high-end cases are going to be "Fermi-certified"; Thermaltake have just paid a bit extra for the badge. If memory serves, weren't Coolermaster producing "Nvidia Edition" cases in 2008?

    "Fermi-certified" is a point of interest, and I wonder if detractors won't pick up on that. Does Fermi SLI run so hot that it needs a special case?

    Just how strongly should we interpret "recommends"? In the sense that you might recommend a good restaurant, or are we looking at a Vista "recommended hardware" situation? If existing mid- and high-end cases aren't certified retrospectively, how much confidence will gamers and enthusiasts be able to place in their rigs?
    12