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JavaScript Performance Benchmarks

Web Browser Grand Prix 9: Chrome 17, Firefox 10, And Ubuntu
By

We removed the Google mod of Kraken and the original Apple SunSpider from our test suite. A recent bug fix to the original Mozilla Kraken essentially makes it the same as the Google mod, and there appears to be no movement on updating the orignal SunSpider.

Futuremark Peacekeeper v2.0

Peacekeeper puts Chrome out in front of the pack in both operating environments, with the Linux version earning top honors. Chrome is followed by Opera and then Firefox on both platforms. Safari and IE9 place fourth and fifth, respectively.

Mozilla Kraken v1.1

Chrome again takes the lead, its Linux version achieving the best overall score. Firefox finishes a close second with nearly identical scores on both operating systems. Opera takes a distant third place finish on both platforms. And like Firefox, it exhibits nearly identical scores. Safari and IE9 once again bring up the rear.

Google SunSpider v0.9

In Windows 7, the lead again goes to Chrome, with Firefox taking a close second place. IE9 places a distant third, followed by Opera in fourth and Safari in fifth.

For the third time in a row, a Linux-based browser beats all of the Windows builds in a JavaScript benchmark. But this time, Firefox takes top honors. Chrome for Linux comes in second place, followed closely by Opera.

Chrome is the clear overall JavaScript winner on both Windows 7 and Ubuntu 11.10.

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  • 11 Hide
    mayankleoboy1 , February 21, 2012 3:45 AM
    IMO, Firefox is concentrating more on HTML5, ignoring CSS and JavaScript.
    It does well in HTML5 benches but 99% of the websites use primarily CSS and JS and HTML3, in which Firefox does poorly.

  • 11 Hide
    mayankleoboy1 , February 21, 2012 3:42 AM
    just wondering if use of a DX11 capable GPU will change scores in some HTML5 and other benchmarks as the browsers use DX11 assisted rendering.

    Also, AMD driver support in linux is poor compared to Nvidia.
    For future Linux articles, can you use a Dx11 based Nvidia GPU?
Other Comments
  • 11 Hide
    mayankleoboy1 , February 21, 2012 3:42 AM
    just wondering if use of a DX11 capable GPU will change scores in some HTML5 and other benchmarks as the browsers use DX11 assisted rendering.

    Also, AMD driver support in linux is poor compared to Nvidia.
    For future Linux articles, can you use a Dx11 based Nvidia GPU?
  • 11 Hide
    mayankleoboy1 , February 21, 2012 3:45 AM
    IMO, Firefox is concentrating more on HTML5, ignoring CSS and JavaScript.
    It does well in HTML5 benches but 99% of the websites use primarily CSS and JS and HTML3, in which Firefox does poorly.

  • 8 Hide
    mayankleoboy1 , February 21, 2012 3:46 AM
    Waiting for OPERA12. It keeps impressing me.
    Even without hardware acceleration, it keeps up with the competition,

    When that beast launches, it will kill FF/IE and most probably chrome too.
  • 3 Hide
    PreferLinux , February 21, 2012 4:45 AM
    Who wants to guess that the poor Linux Flash and WebGL results were because Flash and WebGL don't use hardware acceleration with that graphics card and driver? I would be thinking so.
  • -2 Hide
    mitch074 , February 21, 2012 5:10 AM
    Firefox performance took a dive starting with version 4, where all hardware acceleration was disabled: before then, in version 3.6, XRENDER was used when available (it was 4/5th as fast as IE9 on the same PC) while it is now really slow - it's all software.

    Moreover, the only driver enabled for hardware acceleration on Linux is the Nvidia driver: according to Mozilla (and verified by yours truly on AMD and Intel hardware), most display drivers in Linux suck when it comes to 2D rendering - ouch. Note that Mozilla and Google could add shims to circumvent those bugs, but they don't -not worth the effort, especially when driver makers could fix their bugs rather easily, leaving the browsers broken yet again.
  • 6 Hide
    indian-art , February 21, 2012 5:23 AM
    I use Chrome (19.0.1041.0 dev presently) the most on Linux (Ubuntu) and empirically I felt Chrome works very well. Now your tests confirm it.

    I find Opera 12 really nice too. It can run with Opera 11.61. Opera 12 has a silver icon & 11.61 has its classic red. I like Firefox & Epiphany too.

    Its a shame Safari and IE are not truly cross-platform.
  • 5 Hide
    mayankleoboy1 , February 21, 2012 5:36 AM
    how many of those top 40 sites use HTML5?

    i think that the HTML5 scores should be weighed by a factor of the percent of top40 sites that use HTML5.
    This way actual importance of HTML5 can be judged in real world.
  • -5 Hide
    nd22 , February 21, 2012 5:38 AM
    It's a shame Apple does not pay enough attention to the Windows market and optimize their browser! On Mac Safari is king of the hill - personal opinion of course!
    On Windows I feel that IE9 works really well for me, although Chrome is the speed demon! FF 4+ lost their appeal for me.
  • 6 Hide
    forestie , February 21, 2012 6:55 AM
    The OSes that are used are 64 bits but the browsers are mostly (all?) 32bits on Windows, and probably 64bits on Linux.

    Internet Explorer has 64bits builds on Win7, and Firefox has "almost" a 64bits browser on Windows too: Waterfox, which is a semi-official Firefox for 64bits Windows. Waterfox in particular claims huge improvements over base 32bits install, I would like to see how that translates into real-world.

    Not sure about availability of 64bits editions of other browsers on Windows.

    Here are my wishes:
    -clearly mention if the 32bits or 64bits version of the browser is used
    -where applicable and relevant, test with both 32bits and 64bits variants. I would like to see IE and FF split into 32 and 64 variants on Win for example.

    I personally migrated from FF to WF on my machines 3 weeks ago and find it noticeably faster in everyday use. WF is now my main browser.
  • 1 Hide
    doive1231 , February 21, 2012 7:27 AM
    As long as phones keep using Android, Chrome will be the most popular browser for a long while. Google have got it all sorted.
  • 6 Hide
    mll0576 , February 21, 2012 7:36 AM
    One test that is missing in almost all browser test is memory leak over time

    I find almost all browsers require more and more memory the longer they run

    Example: Chrome 17: 8 new tabs =1500MB
  • 5 Hide
    Marcus52 , February 21, 2012 8:06 AM
    Quote:
    If you caught our recent review and cross-platform benchmarks of Ubuntu 11.10, you saw that Ubuntu won most of the tests, especially in segments where it simply cannot compete, like gaming.


    This sentence makes no sense to me. how can it "win" where it "simply cannot compete"?

    ;) 
  • 1 Hide
    mayankleoboy1 , February 21, 2012 8:35 AM
    Quote:
    The OSes that are used are 64 bits but the browsers are mostly (all?) 32bits on Windows, and probably 64bits on Linux.

    Internet Explorer has 64bits builds on Win7, and Firefox has "almost" a 64bits browser on Windows too: Waterfox, which is a semi-official Firefox for 64bits Windows. Waterfox in particular claims huge improvements over base 32bits install, I would like to see how that translates into real-world.

    Not sure about availability of 64bits editions of other browsers on Windows.

    Here are my wishes:
    -clearly mention if the 32bits or 64bits version of the browser is used
    -where applicable and relevant, test with both 32bits and 64bits variants. I would like to see IE and FF split into 32 and 64 variants on Win for example.

    I personally migrated from FF to WF on my machines 3 weeks ago and find it noticeably faster in everyday use. WF is now my main browser.



    IE9 64 bit performs very bad in comparison to the 32 bit builds.

    For firefox/waterfox, on Windows, using 64 bit builds has the following

    1. Native performance increase due to 64 bit.
    2. Performance degradation due to the fact that the MSVC does not have the same memory optimizations for 64 bit as for 32 bit.
    so overall the experience of 64 bit FF/WF is the same as 32 bit builds.
    For 64 bit Ubuntu, you get the 64 bit FF by default..

    For a really great optimised FF, use PALEMOON.

    @AdamOvera : 32/64 bit should be clearly mentioned in the article.
  • 1 Hide
    Chetou , February 21, 2012 8:54 AM
    mll0576One test that is missing in almost all browser test is memory leak over time I find almost all browsers require more and more memory the longer they runExample: Chrome 17: 8 new tabs =1500MB


    Memory benchmarks are almost useless in WBGP. Browsers leak, and Firefox leaks ALOT. But that is not the only problem. Opera works ok even when it fills up RAM, but Firefox becomes close to useless when it gets RAM deprived.
  • 3 Hide
    ivyanev , February 21, 2012 9:16 AM
    Quote:
    but Firefox becomes close to useless when it gets RAM deprived.

    Nothing works well when ram is full.
    And bashing Opera for doing things different is a shame:o pera don't release RAM but opening closed tab is almost instant ,so they sacrifice RAM for speed.
  • 5 Hide
    mayankleoboy1 , February 21, 2012 9:25 AM
    in FF, when it begans to use 1GB+ memory, it becomes sluggish.
    So it is eating RAM AND becoming slow. I dont mind it eating RAM but it has to be responsive then.
  • 2 Hide
    cirslevin , February 21, 2012 10:36 AM
    mayankleoboy1IMO, Firefox is concentrating more on HTML5, ignoring CSS and JavaScript.It does well in HTML5 benches but 99% of the websites use primarily CSS and JS and HTML3, in which Firefox does poorly.

    indeed in your opinion.

    Maze solver is only one test among hundreds of things CSS does. If you want to argue about what 99% of websites use. then remember 99.9999999999% of websites don't use maze solver. For 99% of the websites, I would argue firefox does excellent job on CSS.

    Firefox has focused on js speed for years with dedicated team, and with current benchmark (overall 2nd), you still claim it perform "poorly"? Its hard to argue you don't have prejudice here.

    99 % of websites use HTML3? please, you argument is like mixture of 1980s and 2020s, whatever way you can put down firefox.

    If you dislike firefox, state it, no need to hide behind the fake data.
  • -1 Hide
    Chetou , February 21, 2012 11:02 AM
    mayankleoboy1in FF, when it begans to use 1GB+ memory, it becomes sluggish.So it is eating RAM AND becoming slow. I dont mind it eating RAM but it has to be responsive then.


    Yes, exactly! It's as if something brakes in Firefox when it gets over 1 GB and Opera is mostly unaffected. I have seen many reports of this, and across all FF versions. That was the main reason I was using Opera for a long time, but I can't stand some of the things they've been doing since late 10 versions. So I'm stuck with terrible Firefox performance, but at least it's customizable. It is its only saving grace.
  • -2 Hide
    Chetou , February 21, 2012 11:14 AM
    These kind of tests and comparisons are mostly useless. Only using the browser over a couple of days with 100+ tabs is what really shows its strengths and weaknesses, usability, performance, reliability...
  • 5 Hide
    mayne92 , February 21, 2012 11:46 AM
    Great review Adam!
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