Philips Evnia 49M2C8900 240 Hz QD-OLED gaming monitor review: Tremendous color and performance

49-inch curved 32:9 QD-OLED with DQHD resolution, 240 Hz, Adaptive-Sync, HDR400, and wide gamut color.

Philips Evnia 49M2C8900
Editor's Choice
(Image: © Tom's Hardware)

Why you can trust Tom's Hardware Our expert reviewers spend hours testing and comparing products and services so you can choose the best for you. Find out more about how we test.

The 49M2C8900 has 10 total picture modes. Standard affords the option of color temp and gamma presets but there are no RGB sliders. Luckily, it’s calibrated at the factory and my sample measured up to its claims.

Grayscale and Gamma Tracking

Our grayscale and gamma tests use Calman calibration software from Portrait Displays. We describe our grayscale and gamma tests in detail here.

The 49M2C8900’s default grayscale tracking test is visually perfect, with all errors below 2dE. 3dE is considered the point where issues are visible to the naked eye. Gamma is slightly wonky with a dip from 10-30% and again at 90%. This is due to luminance values that are too high. Some shadow detail is a tad lighter than it should be. The overall average isn’t too far off, but if you want to compensate, the 2.4 gamma preset is a reasonable compromise.

If you turn the sRGB option on, the gamut shrinks correctly, and grayscale tracking is unaffected. But the gamma at 10 and 20% drops even further, making shadow areas grayer. If you want to run sRGB color, I recommend selecting the 2.4 gamma preset to get that contrast back.

Comparisons

The 49M2C8900 has the best out-of-box grayscale tracking with a very good 1.34dE score. When the other monitors are calibrated, it drops to fifth place, but since the error is completely invisible, it’s a wash. Viewed side by side, there are no visual differences in grayscale tracking between any of the screens.

The group’s gamma tracking is close as well. The 49M2C8900 has slight shadow anomalies, but they will be hard to spot in content. Its deviation of 1.82% represents an actual value of 2.16. The 0.19 range of values is mainly due to the dip I observed in the darker luminance steps.

Color Gamut Accuracy

Our color gamut and volume testing use Portrait Displays’ Calman software. For details on our color gamut testing and volume calculations, click here.

I seriously doubt anyone will complain about the 49M2C8900’s color accuracy. You can see that it’s very saturated with extra verve in all six colors. There are no visual errors here, but the large gamut coverage is plain to see. Tracking is linear and on its hue targets, so nothing will look un-natural.

In the sRGB chart, you can see some slight undersaturation in red and blue, but the other colors are on target. These are very minor errors, and the 49M2C8900 is still qualified for color-critical work in both color spaces.

Comparisons

The 49M2C8900 sits fourth in a very color-accurate group of monitors. There are no visual issues with any of them, and at 1.89dE, you can use the Philips for color grading and mastering work. Remember that no calibration has been performed like the other monitors. This is excellent performance.

When comparing OLED’s color volume, Quantum Dots will always win the day. You can see the clear divide between the top three and the rest. The 49M2C8900 along with the Aorus and Asus screens are within a hair of each other at over 114% coverage of DCI-P3. The rest make do with just under 100%. While this difference is small in practice, it is visible. The main bonus with QD-OLEDs is their higher green saturation. The 92.91% value for sRGB is due to the under-saturated red and blue primaries.

Test Takeaway: The 49M2C8900 delivers bold and vibrant color in all applications. Most users will choose the full gamut for both SDR and HDR but if you want sRGB, it’s there and fully usable. I’d have liked to see adjustable RGB sliders and better gamma tracking but these are minor nits. The Philips image is as stunning as any other OLED.

MORE: Best Gaming Monitors

MORE: How to Buy a PC Monitor

MORE: How to Choose the Best HDR Monitor

Christian Eberle
Contributing Editor

Christian Eberle is a Contributing Editor for Tom's Hardware US. He's a veteran reviewer of A/V equipment, specializing in monitors. Christian began his obsession with tech when he built his first PC in 1991, a 286 running DOS 3.0 at a blazing 12MHz. In 2006, he undertook training from the Imaging Science Foundation in video calibration and testing and thus started a passion for precise imaging that persists to this day. He is also a professional musician with a degree from the New England Conservatory as a classical bassoonist which he used to good effect as a performer with the West Point Army Band from 1987 to 2013. He enjoys watching movies and listening to high-end audio in his custom-built home theater and can be seen riding trails near his home on a race-ready ICE VTX recumbent trike. Christian enjoys the endless summer in Florida where he lives with his wife and Chihuahua and plays with orchestras around the state.

  • Neilbob
    When your monitor is wider than your desk, you've gone too wide...

    Okay, I'm just being facetious here. I am so very much not the target audience for a product like this: I get pains in my neck if I turn my head too much these days.
    Reply
  • Hdwr_Junkie
    What's up with all the insane Monitor aspect ratios??
    32:9 is INSANE!
    You can't put up a single page of a document without having to scroll vertically for half of it!
    That makes monitors like this USELESS for anything but panoramic gaming.
    Start making monitors with a vertical size that compliments the wideness and you'll have a resurgence in sales from people other than hardcore gamers!
    16:10 was a decent aspect ratio. Productive.
    Reply
  • bruiners79
    Hdwr_Junkie said:
    What's up with all the insane Monitor aspect ratios??
    32:9 is INSANE!
    You can't put up a single page of a document without having to scroll vertically for half of it!
    That makes monitors like this USELESS for anything but panoramic gaming.
    Start making monitors with a vertical size that compliments the wideness and you'll have a resurgence in sales from people other than hardcore gamers!
    16:10 was a decent aspect ratio. Productive.
    You've clearly never worked on a ultra wide monitor with a decent resolution.

    I thought they were a gimmick for gaming, and then I brought my first one (49in G9), and wow... greatest productivity gainer I've ever had. In my field of view I would have 4-5 windows open (one for coding, two web browsers testing my code; one for desktop, the other mobile), one for general web browsing (news) and the last space a film or word document / spreadsheet.

    Its so good that when the 57in came out i jumped at it, as the dual 4k does improve vertical scrolling over the 49in.

    Try one, you'll never look back.
    Reply
  • helper800
    Does anyone know the exact subpixel layout for this monitor? On the Philips website it just says: RGB Q-Stripe. Does this use the gen3 QD-OLED pixels or the gen2?
    Reply