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Chrome OS Notebooks Will Be Windows-proof

The Chrome OS Notebook appears to be a rather basic system that's almost the perfect definition of a netbook. Like the early netbooks, the Cr-48 runs a non-Windows operating system and its primary purpose is to run a browser.

While Chrome OS aims to make things quite a bit more user-friendly compared to the early day 7-inch netbooks, there is always going to be the case where a user will ask where the start button is to find solitaire.

So will Chrome OS notebooks also have the option to dual-boot another operating system like Windows? Google says no, as "certified" Chrome OS notebooks will only be able to run the single operating system

Part of that may be due to Chrome OS's use of protected flash memory, which is great for security, but isn't so great for custom installs and for spaciousness.

Another detail Engadget picked up is that Google will be providing live customer support for its initial line of Cr-48 notebooks, even though they aren't commercial items. Google doesn't expect there to be many support issues, however, as it feels that the OS is simple enough for most users.

  • TomsSound
    It's only a matter of time before someone puts windows on there... just to say they did it first. Then.... whole slew of how-to sites.
    Reply
  • amk09
    tomssoundIt's only a matter of time before someone puts windows on there... just to say they did it first. Then.... whole slew of how-to sites.
    Yes, then a whole slew of "OMG Y IZ MY CHROME NETBOOK SO SLOW WIT WINDOWZ???"

    Erm, cuz its not designed for it.
    Reply
  • scook9
    amk09Yes, then a whole slew of "OMG Y IZ MY CHROME NETBOOK SO SLOW WIT WINDOWZ???"Erm, cuz its not designed for it.Actually they WONT be saying that, no caps lock key haha
    Reply
  • utengineer
    Excellent tool for field teams in a commerical environment. They can boot to browser in less than 20 sec and go. For those just browsing, email, and standard office docs.....this is a winner. Windows has so much overhead.
    Reply
  • randomstar
    Is it just me or does that look like to old Dell inspiron b 1400?
    still have one for basic browsing for use by guests at the house..
    Reply
  • gogogadgetliver
    "Google doesn't expect there to be many support issues, however, as it feels that the OS is simple enough for most users."

    Google doesn't get it on support. Nexus users complain about it. Google Docs and Google Apps users complain so much they eventually pack up and go to Microsoft BPOS (Office365).

    The fact that they are releasing a 1.0 operating system and expecting few support issues is laughable.
    Reply
  • r3t4rd
    scook9Actually they WONT be saying that, no caps lock key hahaLULZ!!

    randomstarIs it just me or does that look like to old Dell inspiron b 1400?still have one for basic browsing for use by guests at the house..Beacuse that "IS" what you are looking at. The Dell 1400 is a Pentium II? III? The power on the Google Netbook cannot be more than that! BTW, I have two of those Dell 1400's and a Compaq Armada as dead paperweight.
    Reply
  • Sadly, Not supporting a separate OS install seems too much like Apple for my taste. I love Google's products but I can't say I like this move. Even if it is not completely optimized for windows, once I buy a piece of hardware, I like the flexibility to do whatever I want with it (within reason).
    Reply
  • cryogenic
    Google doesn't expect there to be many support issues, however, as it feels that the OS is simple enough for most users

    That never quite works in practice, no matter how much Google want's it to work.
    Reply
  • @DB-Hey, this Cr48 isn't targeted at consumers. It's a giveaway for developers that are pledging to develop apps for it.
    Reply