Skip to main content

ID-Cooling Builds Dual-Pump All-In-One Liquid Cooler With CPU And GPU Blocks

The question comes up quite often: When will someone make an all-in-one liquid cooling set that cools both your CPU and GPU? Well, the answer is today, and ID-Cooling is the manufacturer that brought it to you with the Hunter Duet Integrated AIO water cooler, the all-in-one liquid cooler that has two water blocks and two pumps to cool your GPU and CPU.

The idea behind the unit is simple. It has a 240 mm radiator with two 120 mm fans, a CPU block with an integrated pump, and a GPU block with an integrated pump. The GPU block comes with a bracket that holds a 90 mm fan, because, of course, the VRM circuitry and memory on the graphics card still need to be cooled, as well.

All three units are wired up in series, so the entire loop has three tubes. The tube from the radiator to the CPU is 250 mm long, the one from the CPU to GPU is also 250 mm, and the one from the GPU back to the radiator is 380 mm. The tubes are made of EPDM rubber.

As mentioned, air is pushed through the radiator by two 120 mm fans. They are SF-12025 fans that spin at speeds between 800 and 2000 RPM, and can push up to 84.5 CFM. ID-Cooling did not disclose the details of the 90 mm fan on the graphics card bracket.

The CPU block is compatible with all modern-day sockets, including LGA2011, LGA1150, and AMD's FM2+ and AM3+ sockets. The GPU block has mounting holes at 58.4 x 58.4 mm, 53.3 x 53.3 mm, and 51.0 x 61.0 mm. These mounting holes make it compatible with most of today's graphics cards, but be sure to check in advance to ensure compatibility.

Of course, at the end of the day there is one big question that remains, which is whether the single 240 mm radiator with the two fans is enough to cool both a CPU and a GPU. For low-power chips, it will probably be okay, but we are afraid that for high-end purposes you may be better off looking at separate loops or a custom kit.

ID-Cooling priced the Hunter Duet Integrated AIO water cooler at $139.99.

Follow Niels Broekhuijsen @NBroekhuijsen. Follow us @tomshardware, on Facebook and on Google+.

  • Larry Litmanen
    Man for $139 it is actually a bargain, most good CPU liquid coolers cost around $70 alone.
    Reply
  • de5_Roy
    surprisingly reasonable but quite complex 'cause of the gfx card cooling system.
    people buying i7 4790k/i7 5930k/fx 9xxx with cards like r9 fury non x might be able to save a bit of moniez from using this.
    Reply
  • SylentVyper
    Man for $139 it is actually a bargain, most good CPU liquid coolers cost around $70 alone.

    For a 240mm AIO cooler, you're looking at about $100, not $70, so it really is a good deal.
    Reply
  • oczdude8
    I think this is can be a great product. This is marketed towards mid-range systems, i5 with a 960, for example, and a 240mm rad should cool both components well. Im more interested to see how cool it can keep the GPU's peripheral components such as VRMs.

    I think saying this will not handle high-end systems is an invalid argument because someone that spends $2000 for just a gpu and a cpu will probably also be willing to spend a couple hundred more for a custom solution, if needed.

    Reply
  • Shankovich
    Was waiting for something like this. Love the idea, but the main issue still remains: No standardized hole placement on GPU boards. That, and cooling the VRMs. A fan blowing on exposed VRMs isn't enough, they need a heatsink with forced air over them. At least HBM memory will solve the RAM chip cooling issue, but no one likes 100+ Celsius VRMs......
    Reply
  • jragonsoul
    I think this is can be a great product. This is marketed towards mid-range systems, i5 with a 960, for example, and a 240mm rad should cool both components well. Im more interested to see how cool it can keep the GPU's peripheral components such as VRMs.

    I think saying this will not handle high-end systems is an invalid argument because someone that spends $2000 for just a gpu and a cpu will probably also be willing to spend a couple hundred more for a custom solution, if needed.
    What makes it invalid? If it's a high power draw system this cooler may not be up to the task. That's what they are saying. It has zero to do with costs and everything to due with it potentially not being able to perform well enough. Seems pretty valid.
    Reply
  • TechyInAZ
    Not the first AIO that cools your CPU and GPU I've seen, but defiantly a better one and more up to date model...

    I like the idea, though I think there needs to be 280mm and 360mm models since a CPU + GPU is a lot of heat to dissipate.
    Reply
  • Frozen Fractal
    Ermmm, seems like the blocks are connected in series - which is ofcourse not a good news. And I fairly doubt whether 240mm rad can keep up, and this may well be just a prototype or aimed towards low-end gamers or SFF builders. But anyway, such ideas are cool to have, especially in such a crowded AiO market where there's only innovation of features and not of techniques.

    Just hope that this doesn't make the cooler too loud! :P
    Reply
  • oczdude8
    I think this is can be a great product. This is marketed towards mid-range systems, i5 with a 960, for example, and a 240mm rad should cool both components well. Im more interested to see how cool it can keep the GPU's peripheral components such as VRMs.

    I think saying this will not handle high-end systems is an invalid argument because someone that spends $2000 for just a gpu and a cpu will probably also be willing to spend a couple hundred more for a custom solution, if needed.
    What makes it invalid? If it's a high power draw system this cooler may not be up to the task. That's what they are saying. It has zero to do with costs and everything to due with it potentially not being able to perform well enough. Seems pretty valid.

    Maybe I should have worded it differently, but saying it wont handle high power systems is pretty silly, because there is no one size fits all solution. What were they supposed to do? use a 480mm radiator to accommodate the 1% of enthusiasts running high power system that would actually buy an AIO?

    Its sorta like reviewing a Toyota Camry and mentioning that it will perform poorly in a race track compared to a Ferrari. While that's completely true (as is the 240mm being insufficient for high powered systems), its irrelevant given the scope. You should only criticise something for what's its built for, not for something else. Clearly this system is not optimized for cooling a 500w cpu and gpu combo.

    Now that being said, I would love to see how it would do trying to cool a 500W TDP; My guess is that it will "work" but the fan noise will be unbearable (atleast for me).
    Reply
  • thundervore
    The Asetek 760GC has been upgraded!!!

    Ive been waiting for this, seems someone head my plea. The issue here is the VRMs but this is a step forward.
    Reply