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OCZ Preps Shipments of 1 TB Octane SSD

The drive will include 512 MB DRAM cache and deliver a maximum bandwidth of 460 MB/s in read processes and 330 MB/s for write processes. The drive tops out at 32,000 IOPS when reading random 4 KB data blocks and at 24,000 IOPS when writing 4 KB blocks.

The drive will be offered for a suggested retail price of 260,000 yen, which translates to about $3,240. There is no official launch date for the U.S. yet, but several retailers are already offering the drive for pre-order and some are promising delivery within 7-days. Pre-availability prices in the U.S. for the OCT1-25SAT3-1T drive are between $2,600 and $3,100.

  • drwho1
    Let me know when they hit $100
    Reply
  • Marfig
    Ugh! Feels like 1989 all over again. Great drives at incredibly expensive prices.

    Not sure when we can expect $ per GB to fall down on SSDs to more manageable levels. But the promise of cheaper SSDs is starting to become old. Interesting also that they had to curb their enthusiasm for a fast drive to keep the price from skyrocketing. At 460/330 this isn't exactly within the typical 5xx MB/s of current offers.

    At its price range this single drive is more expensive than 5 240GB drives, which raises considerably the $/GB. Naturally it's a whole lot more convenient. But the question exists: Exactly what manufacturing process justifies these premium prices?
    Reply
  • futuramafan
    thats more than my entire computer, it would be cool to have such a massive ssd, but...thats expensive
    Reply
  • mindless728
    Marfig, have you thought that because this drive has to use more dense memory ships that is what makes it more expensive, the 240GB drives probably use chips that are 1/2 or 1/4 in density
    Reply
  • Marfig
    mindless728Marfig, have you thought that because this drive has to use more dense memory ships that is what makes it more expensive, the 240GB drives probably use chips that are 1/2 or 1/4 in density
    My point was that we need to hit some manufacturing milestones yet before SSD technology becomes anything more than a pipe dream of mainstream computing. I should have elaborated.

    Consider this, despite all the advantages we recognize in SSDs, their $/GB has been an inconvenience not just to our wallets but to the use we can make of the added performance. And we then learn that increasing capacity raises that dollar per GB ratio even further to nearly unmanageable levels. So, the closer an SSD gets to become a broad scope drive, the more we have to pay for it. Up to a point where a 1TB SSD costs as much as 10 240GB SSD.

    Despite the coolness of the technology (which I'm not going to dispute), there's a real manufacturing process problem here that we need to overcome.
    Reply
  • g00fysmiley
    I like seeing ssd's geting bigger and bigger... but man its odd tha tthe price per gig goes up as you increse in size, my agility 120 gig ssd was $100 (caught it on sale) so less than a dollar a gig, vs this at $3.24 a gig i know more dense memory is more expensive and harder to make but i think there is more premium pricing and higher profit margins on these larger drives. if ssd really want to replace hdd they should be trying to make them bigger and for as cheap as possible so people get used to the speed of ssd's to see faster market gain
    Reply
  • jay2tall
    I be willing to spend $500 on something like this. Let me know when the cost comes down.

    To be honest for consumer purposes, I don't see 1 TB being needed at this moment. Most people stick with a boot SSD or one for OS and APPS. I wouldn't put my data on an SSD just yet.
    Reply
  • mindless728
    9365109 said:
    My point was that we need to hit some manufacturing milestones yet before SSD technology becomes anything more than a pipe dream of mainstream computing. I should have elaborated.

    Consider this, despite all the advantages we recognize in SSDs, their $/GB has been an inconvenience not just to our wallets but to the use we can make of the added performance. And we then learn that increasing capacity raises that dollar per GB ratio even further to nearly unmanageable levels. So, the closer an SSD gets to become a broad scope drive, the more we have to pay for it. Up to a point where a 1TB SSD costs as much as 10 240GB SSD.

    Despite the coolness of the technology (which I'm not going to dispute), there's a real manufacturing process problem here that we need to overcome.

    It has always been the case the that $/GB on the largest drives are higher than the lower drives and that is usually from a few things
    1) The cost to have densities that high are much more expensive that lower densities
    2) There is more R&D that goes into having devices this high end
    3) Usually more parts in the larger capacity drives (platters for HDD, chips for SSD) that they warranty

    Look at the cost of 4TB drives and even 3TB drives, it shows there as well in the HDD sector

    Also, to have 10 240GB SSD's, you would need an add in controller card, granted the cost for that will not be that much in comparison to the drive cost, but it is another part and expansion slot that is used, then there is the amount of power and space that having 10 times more drives (for ssd's power is pretty much negligible, but space is not)

    btw if you think this is expensive, check out the enterprise grade drives compared to enterprise grade HDD's, there is a huge price difference at the same capacity there as well

    I for one would be all for lower $/GB SSD's, but there are a myriad of reasons to why this is not so
    Reply
  • Chaz21
    Like everything else PC related, these big SSD's were developed for business and industrial applications. They aren't yet priced for the consumer but rather for the only market that can afford them. They will eventually make their way to "our" price level just like the HDD's did. It's a natural progression. Patience is all that's needed.
    Reply
  • robisinho
    this suggested price is clearly a typo -- 28000 yen is almost certainly the correct price. Why would you wait to pay 3.4k $US for 1TB of SSD nand operating at speeds that were not even competitive last year, when you can buy 2×512GB of crucial's m4 at 2×~$425 dollars right now?
    Reply