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Intel SSD 335 240 GB Review: Driving Down Prices With 20 nm NAND

128 KB Sequential Performance

Sequential Read Performance

Examples include file copying, transcoding, game level loading, some gameplay, watching video, and editing video

With the exception of Crucial’s m4, all of the drives we're including top out between 530 and 550 MB/s in sequential reads. That's the practical limit of what we can expect from SATA 6Gb/s, so don't expect to break past that barrier any time soon.

Dipping back to a queue depth of one is where we see the biggest differences between drives, though. Samsung’s 840 Pro serves us close to 410 MB/s, and the Vertex 4 isn't far behind. In comparison, the SSD 335 (like other SandForce-based SSDs) starts out around 310 MB/s and only manages to beat that m4 drive.

Sequential Write Performance

Examples include Application Installation, Document Backup

In many ways, the graph of sequential write performance looks a lot like the chart for sequential reads. At a queue depth of one, the SSD 330, 335, and 520 all deliver about 350 MB/s and eventually top out around 510 MB/s.

Although Monster’s 240 GB Daytona eventually hits the same ceiling, it starts a bit lower and doesn't scale up as quickly. Meanwhile, Samsung's 840 Pro tops the chart again.

  • mayankleoboy1
    Read only the conclusion. Most of these SSD's are "me-too" clones using SF2281 controller. Most have similar performance wins and pitfalls.

    I was super excited about Samsung 840. But these are meh.
    Reply
  • christophermarti
    I would say that your estimates about P/E cycles are incorrect. You also do not mention (on purpose) two modes SSD's (99%) operate in: performance mode (not filled to 90%) and storage mode (filled 90% and more). You also lack to mention that in "middle of" P/E cycle exhaustion SSD's will slow down their speed due to preserve P/E cycles and "survive" to meet warranty agreements.

    http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?271063-SSD-Write-Endurance-25nm-Vs-34nm/page211

    From test exposed in this forum You can draw conclusion how good MLC used in X-25v 40GB SSD were (more than 35000 P/E). Also that longest "standing" SSD is Samsung 830 256GB, which also do not (as an exception) slow down considerably when it passes 1PB Host Writes mark.

    Although I strongly do agree that seing writes above 10GB per day is rather rare. I'm myself using 80GB X25-M for 4 years and only 4,09 TB and i is possible that it will hold up to 1400 - 3400 TB of writes! That's amazing. What's more, I have it in Dell E6400 on Vista (no Trim, just Intel toolbox).
    Reply
  • christophermarti
    http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?271063-SSD-Write-Endurance-25nm-Vs-34nm&p=5148307&viewfull=1#post5148307 - 1000 P/E cycles (not even close to 35100 of 50nm old V40 GB).
    Reply
  • alidan
    christophermartihttp://www.xtremesystems.org/forum ost5148307 - 1000 P/E cycles (not even close to 35100 of 50nm old V40 GB).
    keep in mind that is still 240000 gb of data at minimum
    Reply
  • abbadon_34
    so if it's firmware crippled, can we just flash a the firmware and get a better drive? someone needs to do some testing....
    Reply
  • acku
    christophermartiI would say that your estimates about P/E cycles are incorrect. You also do not mention (on purpose) two modes SSD's (99%) operate in: performance mode (not filled to 90%) and storage mode (filled 90% and more). You also lack to mention that in "middle of" P/E cycle exhaustion SSD's will slow down their speed due to preserve P/E cycles and "survive" to meet warranty agreements. http://www.xtremesystems.org/forum nm/page211From test exposed in this forum You can draw conclusion how good MLC used in X-25v 40GB SSD were (more than 35000 P/E). Also that longest "standing" SSD is Samsung 830 256GB, which also do not (as an exception) slow down considerably when it passes 1PB Host Writes mark.Although I strongly do agree that seing writes above 10GB per day is rather rare. I'm myself using 80GB X25-M for 4 years and only 4,09 TB and i is possible that it will hold up to 1400 - 3400 TB of writes! That's amazing. What's more, I have it in Dell E6400 on Vista (no Trim, just Intel toolbox).
    Our calculations and endurance protocol are not effected by any speed slow down, and in every test, we've confirmed our methodology applies a WA~1%. Thus, are estimates are correct and apply to the NAND itself.

    Second, the speed of a drive has no inherent bearing on endurance. It only affects how fast you can get there. Second, you're referring to a throttling effect, which is a different topic completely. Our analysis was specific to the NAND itself.

    As further verification, another one of my peers (at another site) independently came to results for the SSD 335 similar to ours.
    Reply
  • cumi2k4
    how come vertex 4 did not get tested? didn't ocz offer 5 years for their vertex 4, and i believe they're offering them at cut-throat pricing?
    Reply
  • mayankleoboy1
    One thing i notice is that with an Antivirus program(Kaspersky Internet security) running in the background, which 95% of Toms readers would have, the AV program reads and writes data almost continuously. In a typical day, the AV program can write 5-6GB of data.
    Reply
  • jabliese
    Power consumption made me laugh. 1 watt difference between the best and worst. Time for another 1 line standard SSD review comment, "Power usage on SSD's matters little between the best and worst."

    And please keep reiterating the most important thing about an SSD is getting one. Ran into SSD resistance on another forum just a couple weeks back, which, at today's price points, blew me away.
    Reply
  • acku
    cumi2k4how come vertex 4 did not get tested? didn't ocz offer 5 years for their vertex 4, and i believe they're offering them at cut-throat pricing?
    Look again. It is included in our benchmarks.
    Reply