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Buffalo Unveils 256GB IDE-Based SSDs

Consumers looking for solid state disk (SSD) speeds and capacities--but are stuck with an IDE-based motherboard--will soon see a solution from Buffalo. Slated for a release later this month, a new 256GB addition to its current line of IDE-based SHD-NHPU2 SSDs will offer both a USB 2.0 connection and an IDE interface. The SHD-NHPU2 line was originally introduced back in April.

Although the drives use multi-level cell (MLC) NAND flash memory and 64MB of DRAM cache, end-users won't see blazing fast improvements as they would if using an SATA 2-based motherboard and SSD. Still, there should be some slight improvement when compared to the clunkier mechanical hard drive. For consumers with low budgets, this may be a cheap way to increase performance without buying a new motherboard and processor.

Reports indicate that this new 256GB addition will provide read speeds of up to 101 MB/s (no writes indicated) and come in a standard 2.5-inch package measuring 70-mm x 100-mm x 9.5-mm. This particular drive will be priced at $1,220 when it hits the market, however no specific date or retailer was given (and will not be available in Europe).

  • christop
    Can't afford this...
    Reply
  • naterandrews
    Odd that such a high capacity drive would be aimed at that market? High price tag and slower speeds- why bother upgrading to that instead of a whole new setup (sata300/600 for that price?)
    Reply
  • rollerdisco
    Well the performance might not be a huge boost, but battery life should go up and heat should drop.
    Reply
  • stapleton87
    Yep, upgrade your computer without buy an expensive new CPU and motherboard. Just buy a SSD for only $1220!
    Reply
  • Mizoguchi
    I lol'd when I saw the $1220
    Reply
  • chickenhoagie
    IDE connectors....disgusting...
    Reply
  • rollerdisco
    rollerdiscoWell the performance might not be a huge boost, but battery life should go up and heat should drop.Assuming the $1,220 price is a typo.
    Reply
  • This must be geared towards the industrial market. A lot of machines like a press brake, shear, laser cutter, etc use a lot of legacy equipment (serial ports, ide connections, etc). Given some of the crazy environments this type of equipment is found in, it will be a blessing to move away from mechanical drives that could be infiltrated by dust particles. Plus businesses are less likely to bat an eye towards dropping $1,000 into a $150,000 machine.
    Reply
  • shin0bi272
    YAPPH (Yet Another Pointless Piece of Hardware)
    Reply
  • failboat
    LMAO, pay 1200 to get a minor upgrade on a terrible computer rather than get a new mobo,cpu, and ram. You build a brand new i7 build, with that kind of dough.
    Reply