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AMD Navi Graphics, Zen Cores to Unite in Next Xbox, PlayStation - Report

Well-known computer hardware leaker TUM_APISAK in a tweet this week claimed to unmask AMD's upcoming system-on-a-chip (SoC) for gaming consoles. The AMD SoC, allegedly called Gonzalo, reportedly combines the chipmaker's Zen processor architecture with it's future Navi graphics card architecture. The chip also fits the description of an accelerated processing unit (APU), meaning the processor should have integrated graphics.

(Image credit: AMD)

AMD Gonzalo with the codename 2G16002CE8JA2_32/10/10_13E9 could possibly be the APU that powers the next-generation gaming consoles from Sony and Microsoft. At this time, it's not clear it's based on the Zen+ or Zen 2 architecture. However, Brad Sams, Executive Editor at Thurott, said last month that Microsoft's Xbox Scarlett will come equipped with an AMD Zen 2 octa-core processor built on the 7nm node.

AMD Gonzalo purportedly features eight cores with a 1GHz base clock and a boost clock in the range of 3.2GHz. Sony's current Playstation 4 Pro employs a semi-custom AMD chip that tops out at 2.13GHz, while Microsoft's Xbox One X flaunts a slightly higher clocked part at 2.3GHz. If AMD Gonzalo's reported 3.2GHz boost clock speed is true, the APU will provide a very substantial performance improvement to the current generation of consoles running AMD SoCs based on the Jaguar architecture.

What's more important with AMD Gonzalo is the potential incorporation of Navi 10 Lite graphics. Information on Navi 10 Lite is almost non-existent; however, reports say the unit utilized in AMD Gonzalo could come clocked at 1GHz.

The latest rumor suggests that AMD will finally launch Navi at the E3 video game conference in Los Angeles, California this June. The rumor has some logic behind it as the Sony PlayStation 5 and Microsoft Xbox Scarlett have expected release dates of 2020.

  • epobirs
    So, pretty much exactly what any casual observer would guess.
    Reply
  • redgarl
    Honestly, everybody knew it already. It was just a matter of time before true glimpse of confirmation were reported.
    Reply
  • AgentLozen
    Is it wise to employ a boost clock speed on a console?

    In the case of the Ryzen 2700X CPU, clock speeds will boost from 3.7GHz to 4.3GHz depending on thermal conditions. If that's any indicator of how Gonzalo will behave, then can we expect XBox Two and Playstation 5 to change its clock speed based on thermal measurements? Consequently, will games have to dynamically reduce their resolution and detail level to compensate for the change in CPU speed?
    Reply
  • hannibal
    This would be huge upgrade in CPU power!
    Jaguar and Ryzen cores are like comparing Atom to i series in intel... or even bigger.
    Reply
  • okorjeli
    Didn't Sony help finance Navi?
    So MS might need to use Vega if Sony have exclusivity to Navi.
    At least that is the rumor.
    Reply
  • JamesSneed
    21690759 said:
    Is it wise to employ a boost clock speed on a console?

    In the case of the Ryzen 2700X CPU, clock speeds will boost from 3.7GHz to 4.3GHz depending on thermal conditions. If that's any indicator of how Gonzalo will behave, then can we expect XBox Two and Playstation 5 to change its clock speed based on thermal measurements? Consequently, will games have to dynamically reduce their resolution and detail level to compensate for the change in CPU speed?

    Sure why not as long as thermals are kept in check. Also it may just be single core boost which would limit the thermals a lot and likely would not run into any of the issues you are thinking about.
    Reply
  • FunSurfer
    Speedy Gonzalos
    Reply
  • lightofhonor
    21690759 said:
    Is it wise to employ a boost clock speed on a console?

    In the case of the Ryzen 2700X CPU, clock speeds will boost from 3.7GHz to 4.3GHz depending on thermal conditions. If that's any indicator of how Gonzalo will behave, then can we expect XBox Two and Playstation 5 to change its clock speed based on thermal measurements? Consequently, will games have to dynamically reduce their resolution and detail level to compensate for the change in CPU speed?

    Obviously this is not confirmed so could change, but guessing the boost clocks are more like developer options. Max boost but reduced GPU speed, or only 4 cores at max speed and the GPU at normal, etc. Base speed is more like OS usage.

    Normally consoles have a lower than actual max speed to account for throttle or battery life, like the Switch, so either way I wouldn't worry to much about throttling.
    Reply
  • nadhir.brighet
    I'm sure about this turbo thing, not all consoles run in the same environment, some consoles can be thermally limited.
    Reply
  • AlistairAB
    Even game designers cannot completely predict CPU load, as games are interactive. I can imagine a 3.2ghz boost working out well for the console. I'd be happy with a fixed 3.2ghz also though. I don't think the power draw would be that high.
    Reply