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Microsoft Extends Windows 7 to XP Downgrade

As eager as we all are to install the final version of Windows 7 onto our PCs, businesses can’t deal with change that quickly, especially not when dealing with hundreds of systems and different compatibility issues.

The issue here is that Windows 7 will be shipping with most PCs by the end of 2009, meaning that businesses still running an older version of Windows will have to either quickly upgrade their systems or obtain some form of downgrade license from Microsoft. After all, that is what business have been doing with Vista.

Things potentially could have been a lot different with Windows 7. While both Windows 7 Professional and Ultimate come with XP downgrade licenses, Microsoft originally intended for the offer to downgrade only be good for six months following the general availability of Windows 7 on October 22, 2009.

This meant that businesses still running XP either had to purchase new Windows 7 licenses before April 22, 2010. Downgrades to Windows Vista, however, would continue to be available after that date. While Microsoft is keen to transition its customers away from an eight-year old OS, many felt that a six-month period is too short.

In response to this, Microsoft has decided to extend its XP downgrade period by another year, now making XP still a valid path for new purchases for 18 months after the release of Windows 7 – or until the first service pack hits (a point at which many business consider it a stable upgrade).

"Windows 7 Professional and Ultimate customers will have the option to downgrade to Windows XP Professional from PCs that ship within 18 months following the general availability of Windows 7 or until the release of a Windows 7 service pack, whichever is sooner, and if a service pack is developed," a company spokeswoman said in an e-mail to Computerworld.

And so, Windows XP lives on.

  • curnel_D
    If you give that market a chance to save money by sticking with xp, they're going to do it. It's just a little bit more cash that lines the board or ceo pockets.

    Microsoft is in a position of power here to usher out old technology and force in the new, by ceasing support for an 8 year old OS. (As well as potentially removing alot of the bad view of security surrounding their company.) But instead they let the Elderly CEO's and Boardmembers (Of whom are probably trying to buy a second vacation home) of this world dictate the direction of Microsoft's software technology.
    Reply
  • apache_lives
    WTF microsoft
    Reply
  • fausto
    microsoft is so stupid, segmenting windows 7 was just moronic. they should make one product, one price. and be done with it.
    Reply
  • Vettedude
    "and if a service pack is developed,"

    I hope their will be one. It would probably make Windows 7 even more rock solid stable.
    Reply
  • A Stoner
    Curnel_DIf you give that market a chance to save money by sticking with xp, they're going to do it. It's just a little bit more cash that lines the board or ceo pockets.
    Funny, this all also effects individuals, ones like me. Even if corporations get to save money, it is not purely going to line the pockets of just the higher up people. A business not failing is one that continues to emply people. A business that spends less on IT is one that can spend more in salaries and benifits. While the larger proportion per captia of increased spending will go towards higher ups, it is always like that. The reason they are higher up is because they have skills that make them more valuable and less replaceable. People who have skills that everyone have compete against everybody, and thus they are not in a position to make strong demands for compensation where as a company executive has skills that few people have, and if he is better than the rest, that just amplifies his bargaining postion.

    You are such a pathetic human for thinking that people who get paid well are evil. You do not look at what they give in return for that pay.
    Reply
  • mdillenbeck
    faustomicrosoft is so stupid, segmenting windows 7 was just moronic. they should make one product, one price. and be done with it.I disagree. 3 product tiers would be reasonable: Home edition, Enterprise Edition, and Ultimate Edition. That way they could keep all the games and multimedia/HTPC stuff in the home edition, put all the business level security and remote access (plus remote management) in the Enterprise edition, and put all that stuff in the Ultimate edition.

    However, I feel anything more than this is excessive and designed to increase the price of the top-tier products.
    Reply
  • starhoof
    I bet its just for same people who were crying that vista takes too much resources to run, these same people will complain that windows 7 takes too much resources to run. Just because people are running it on their computers that they bought in w@lmart like 5 years ago, and they cant run anything but xp smootly. Thats the simple explanation why you still can downgrade to xp.
    Reply
  • fulle
    Stoner... the percentage of people who are independently wealthy due to hard work and out-skilling the competition is vastly smaller than the percentage of those who were simply born into a privileged position.

    Often, it takes money to make money. And the rich are more aware of where the loop holes lie, and how to work the system.

    They don't work harder.

    That said, I also disagree with Curnel_D's assumption that savings in IT software license costs won't positively effect us working grunts. To illustrate, every time I've seen a company I've worked for get audited, and need to come up with say, 60k in license cost... someone gets the axe lower on the tier. Perhaps a contract worker, or someone who hasn't been perm that long.

    Windows 7 isn't anything revolutionary either, to the point that sticking with XP is holding back technology. Its just an OS. One slightly superior in many ways, but lacking compelling reasons for an enterprise to care. My little end users will send Outlook emails just fine in XP if an upgrade doesn't occur.
    Reply
  • JMS3096
    I'm going for a -10 here.

    Anyone that stays with XP as a primary OS over 7 is an idiot. There is no software currently only for XP that would not work just fine in virtualization.
    Reply
  • Vettedude
    JMS3096I'm going for a -10 here.Anyone that stays with XP as a primary OS over 7 is an idiot. There is no software currently only for XP that would not work just fine in virtualization.I agree. But I will vote you down to help you reach your goal :D
    Reply