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Nvidia Stolen Data Reportedly Reveals Ada, Hopper, Blackwell GPUs

Nvidia GPU
Nvidia GPU (Image credit: Shutterstock)

LAPSU$, the South American hacker group that made away with over 1TB of Nvidia's information, managed to strike gold with its latest heist. A VideoCardz reader (opens in new tab) reportedly sent the media outlet information extracted from the hack that allegedly talks about Nvidia's next-generation graphics cards, codenamed Ada, Hopper, and Blackwell. Unfortunately, it's unknown how the VideoCardz reader obtained the information, and we obviously can't confirm it. Therefore, we recommend you take the news with a truckload of salt.

It recently came to light that LAPSU$ had hacked into Nvidia's server and stole some pretty valuable data. While Nvidia has returned the favor, the hacker group presumably had the last laugh because it had a backup of the stolen data. The groups of bandits even asked Nvidia to remove the LHR (Lite Hash Rate) mining performance limiter from its GeForce RTX 30-series (Ampere) graphics cards, or the group will release the bypass itself.

The leaked information seemingly confirms that Ada (named after Ada Lovelace) is the next gaming architecture to replace Ampere. It's not exactly breaking news since we've suspected that Ada was the codename for Nvidia's forthcoming GeForce RTX 40-series for some time now. The specifications are unknown, but the leaked material speaks of AD102, AD103, AD104, AD106, AD107, and AD10B silicon.

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Nvidia Ada, Hopper, Blackwell

Nvidia Ada, Hopper, Blackwell (Image credit: VideoCardz)
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Nvidia Ada, Hopper, Blackwell

Nvidia Ada, Hopper, Blackwell (Image credit: VideoCardz)
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Nvidia Ada, Hopper, Blackwell

Nvidia Ada, Hopper, Blackwell (Image credit: VideoCardz)

Meanwhile, the data center may see the arrival of Hopper (named after Grace Hopper) very soon. The leaked files confirm that Hopper still appears to be the codename for Nvidia's next data center graphics card. Nvidia filed for the Hopper trademark in 2019 but has been in a legal dispute with Dish Network over the trademark. So who knows if Nvidia will have to change the codename down the line. At any rate, Hopper may father two silicons: the GH100 and GH202.

Blackwell should be the architecture to succeed Hopper. It's plausible that Nvidia wanted to pay tribute to David Harold Blackwell, a famous American statistician, and mathematician. It's not the first time we've heard the name since respected Nvidia leaker kopite7kimi had tweeted about Blackwell in April of last year, although we weren't sure if it was the successor then to Ada or Hopper. Blackwell should be Hopper's direct replacement if the hacked files are accurate and arrive in both the GB100 and GB102 silicons.

Zhiye Liu
Zhiye Liu

Zhiye Liu is a Freelance News Writer at Tom’s Hardware US. Although he loves everything that’s hardware, he has a soft spot for CPUs, GPUs, and RAM.

  • spongiemaster
    The code names for GPU's, all of which we've known for almost a year or more, are considered "juicy details?" Seriously? You should be embarrassed to have such low standards.
    Reply
  • ingtar33
    yay, more gpus which no one can buy for less then a down payment on a car.
    Reply
  • Friesiansam
    I think I'll wait to buy a new graphics card, until Nvidia launch a GPU called Incontinentia. (a character in The Life of Brian)
    Reply
  • pjmelect
    With any luck the schematics of the graphics cards will be leaked, to aid in the repair of the graphics cards. Support right to repair.
    Reply
  • Jesse_20
    "Therefore, we recommend you take the news with a truckload of salt."

    This seems to be the sum of all stories on Tom's lately. I ask you, why read if you only report rumors?
    Steps off my high horse
    Reply
  • Eximo
    pjmelect said:
    With any luck the schematics of the graphics cards will be leaked, to aid in the repair of the graphics cards. Support right to repair.

    Of the few cards Nvidia actually designs, sure. That just leaves all the other AIB boards.

    On the whole, GPU boards aren't too complicated at the component level. Board level repair just isn't usually economical viable most of the time. Buying small numbers of components, diagnosing which components failed, desoldering, soldering new components (Only to see if that fixes the issue). If the card fails within warranty period it just needs to go back to the manufacturer. Once it is out of warranty, you are looking at several hundred dollars for repair (and it will have depreciated), which is only worthwhile on cards valued well above that. Then you run the risk of the repair failing...
    Reply
  • digitalgriffin
    Remove the LHR Limiter NVIDIA or we'll do it for you

    Ummm ooookaaaaaaaayyyyy. The only thing that could be dangerous is release of the UEFI key NVIDIA uses. This would open a massive back door to UEFI viruses. Idiot hackers would only be hurting themselves. The key would be black listed, but leave older systems vulnerable.
    Reply
  • pjmelect
    Of the few cards Nvidia actually designs, sure. That just leaves all the other AIB boards.

    On the whole, GPU boards aren't too complicated at the component level. Board level repair just isn't usually economical viable most of the time. Buying small numbers of components, diagnosing which components failed, desoldering, soldering new components (Only to see if that fixes the issue). If the card fails within warranty period it just needs to go back to the manufacturer. Once it is out of warranty, you are looking at several hundred dollars for repair (and it will have depreciated), which is only worthwhile on cards valued well above that. Then you run the risk of the repair failing...
    I repair graphics cards and my job would be made a lot easier if I had the circuit diagrams available, it could make the difference between an economic repair and scraping the card. The other AIB boards are usually very similar electrically to the Nvidia’s ones and the Nvidia’s circuit would help a lot.

    Support right to repair.
    Reply
  • Friesiansam
    Jesse_20 said:
    "Therefore, we recommend you take the news with a truckload of salt."

    This seems to be the sum of all stories on Tom's lately. I ask you, why read if you only report rumors?
    Steps off my high horse
    All sites under the control of Future Publishing are run the same way, clickbait, clickbait, clickbait...
    Reply