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Say Goodbye to Adobe Flash Player for Android

By - Source: Adobe | B 55 comments

We hate long goodbyes, don't you?

You might remember, back in November, when Adobe revealed its plans to focus on Flash for the PC and mobile applications packaged with Adobe AIR. Part of this shift in focus involved the discontinuation of development of Flash Player for mobile browsers. Now it seems the end has arrived for the Flash plugin for Android.

Adobe in June announced that Flash Player was not certified for use with Android 4.1 and recommended users with devices running 4.1 uninstall the plugin. Further, the company confirmed that beginning August 15, it would use the configuration settings in the Google Play Store to limit continued access to Flash Player updates to only those devices that had Flash Player already installed.

In case you haven't had a chance to check your calendars, today is August 15. It seems Adobe is prepared to let the day pass without any formal announcement on its official Adobe AIR and Adobe Flash Player Team blog. Adobe announced the August 15 deadline shortly after Android 4.1, AKA Jelly Bean, was unveiled.

In November, Adobe pointed to the widespread support of HTML5 as the reason for Adobe's departure from the mobile market.

"[...] HTML5 is now universally supported on major mobile devices, in some cases exclusively," the company said last year. "This makes HTML5 the best solution for creating and deploying content in the browser across mobile platforms. We are excited about this, and will continue our work with key players in the HTML community, including Google, Apple, Microsoft and RIM, to drive HTML5 innovation they can use to advance their mobile browsers."

The comments bring back memories of Steve Jobs' crusade against Flash on iOS. When asked why the iPad didn't support Flash, Jobs called the plugin buggy, and said that 'whenever a Mac crashes, more often than not it's because of Flash.' The late CEO of Apple then said that the world was moving towards HTML5.

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Top Comments
  • 23 Hide
    Marco925 , August 15, 2012 5:28 PM
    It was also the reason why many bought an android.
  • 22 Hide
    A Bad Day , August 15, 2012 5:30 PM
    As much as HTML5 looks promising, it needs security work. Flash programs have two layers of encryption so breaking into them is somewhat difficult.

    HTML5? Right click, open source, and it will reveal everything.
  • 14 Hide
    schmich , August 15, 2012 6:17 PM
    Wrong move in my opinion. Google should have worked with Adobe to keep flash as it is. Don't need more things, just keep it supported.

    This is a step backwards, especially when it comes to Android taking its first steps in the netbook/notebook/desktop market. Flash isn't going away for a while and it works flawless on my 16month old SGS2. Can do HD video without any lag.

    If there are any out there who say good riddance: have you uninstalled Flash on your desktop/laptop? Thought not.

    We'll just have to save the flash apk. I feel sorry for the average Joe who doesn't know it's possible to just side-load Flash.
Other Comments
    Display all 55 comments.
  • 23 Hide
    Marco925 , August 15, 2012 5:28 PM
    It was also the reason why many bought an android.
  • 22 Hide
    A Bad Day , August 15, 2012 5:30 PM
    As much as HTML5 looks promising, it needs security work. Flash programs have two layers of encryption so breaking into them is somewhat difficult.

    HTML5? Right click, open source, and it will reveal everything.
  • 3 Hide
    chomlee , August 15, 2012 5:32 PM
    I have been noticing that many of the sites have been switching over to a different source of streaming. I am assuming this is because they are using HTML5 instead of flash.
  • 13 Hide
    sylvez , August 15, 2012 5:44 PM
    john_4Linux is open source too yet is very secure so your point is...If your cards are out in the open for everyone to scrutinize then it does not take long before there are no holes left to exploit.


    I believe he meant the security of the codes (intellectual property). Its too easy to access the codes, and all it takes is a good enough programmer to replace all the images/sounds and call it a new game/app.
    Well, afaik anyway. Not a HTML5 programmer full time.
  • 1 Hide
    tachi1247 , August 15, 2012 5:56 PM
    So does this mean that if I do a factory reset on my phone then I will no longer be able to install flash? Or is the flash app linked to my google account?
  • 14 Hide
    schmich , August 15, 2012 6:17 PM
    Wrong move in my opinion. Google should have worked with Adobe to keep flash as it is. Don't need more things, just keep it supported.

    This is a step backwards, especially when it comes to Android taking its first steps in the netbook/notebook/desktop market. Flash isn't going away for a while and it works flawless on my 16month old SGS2. Can do HD video without any lag.

    If there are any out there who say good riddance: have you uninstalled Flash on your desktop/laptop? Thought not.

    We'll just have to save the flash apk. I feel sorry for the average Joe who doesn't know it's possible to just side-load Flash.
  • 3 Hide
    proxy711 , August 15, 2012 6:54 PM
    A Bad DayAs much as HTML5 looks promising, it needs security work. Flash programs have two layers of encryption so breaking into them is somewhat difficult.HTML5? Right click, open source, and it will reveal everything.

    Ya adobe has been at the pinnacle of security for.....HAHAHAHAHA.....em..sorry couldn't even type that with out laughing.
  • 8 Hide
    dextermat , August 15, 2012 7:04 PM
    I wish I could say goodbye flash and java on pc as they are mostly responsible for malware these days
  • -2 Hide
    spookyman , August 15, 2012 7:14 PM
    Well I never could get Adobe flash to work on my Android.

  • 2 Hide
    theabsinthehare , August 15, 2012 7:24 PM
    Flash sucks period. It filled a hole back in the day, when media was new on the internet, but audio/video streaming and animation are now fundamental parts of the web. Having a proprietary system for a basic part of the web is bad, and not only that, flash hasn't been that great to begin with. There have been security issues, licensing issues (The reason console browsers never had Flash was because Adobe refused to license to them), performance issues, porting issues.
    Apple realized that it was time to change, and sometimes you need to make some sacrifices and use a heavy hand to get changes done. Yes, it sucked in the beginning when iOS didn't have flash and HTML5 wasn't ready, but I believe it was Apple's decision to completely get rid of Flash on their mobile devices that has caused the world to adopt HTML5 so fast.

    Regardless of your feelings for Apple, this was a *really* good thing for the web as a whole, and I can't wait until Flash is completely dead.
  • 0 Hide
    cRACKmONKEY421 , August 15, 2012 7:29 PM
    Yes, bad move. Way to stick to the vision Adobe. Why not just kill flash for PC too then? Maybe then we can have a unified web experience. I've always hated phones do not successfully deliver the same web as computers. It's gotten a lot better, but screen resolution and processing power is enough to literally just have a smaller version of the exact same thing. Sure, you would still needs apps to optimize layout for the size. But now instead of waiting for phones to catch up to the PC's web browser experience, we have to wait for the web to seamlessly support mobile and PC. Always wished x86 compatible were somehow magically good also.
  • -4 Hide
    jerm1027 , August 15, 2012 7:34 PM
    A Bad DayAs much as HTML5 looks promising, it needs security work. Flash programs have two layers of encryption so breaking into them is somewhat difficult.HTML5? Right click, open source, and it will reveal everything.

    Open-source does not mean insecure. Quite the opposite really. Google Chrome (derived from the open source Crhromium project) has run 4 straight years without being compromised at a hacking contest. It was then compromised through the Flash plug-in.
    Ubuntu is leaps and bounds more secure than any Windows operating system, especially for the typical home user. There is practically no malware written for the system.
    The open source model allows for multiple programmers to look at the code, identify security flaws, and patch them faster than the proprietary model can even identify them. And as Adobe has made clear, it sometimes may not be in the best interest of a company to patch a piece of software when they can release a new version and force you to upgrade. *coughcoughCScough*
  • 2 Hide
    eternalkp , August 15, 2012 7:35 PM
    flash sucks? please
    I am not sure what android is doing. this sucks for a lot of people
    i love adobe flash. believe it or not, a lot of websites are still supporting flash
    and i don't think everyone will convert to html5 soon.

    i love how apple users quickly jumps in and credits apple for this nonsense
    this is a step backward.
    i see some cool new features on my cousin's google galaxy nexus with jeally bean but i don't think i will upgrade my galaxy s3 to jelly bean when the day comes
  • 12 Hide
    internetlad , August 15, 2012 7:46 PM
    getrealSTEVE JOBS WAS RIGHT AGAIN! Flash sucks on mobile. Apple was right, like usual.Android is now copying Apple yet again!


    Not sure if trolling or just didn't read the article.
  • 3 Hide
    theabsinthehare , August 15, 2012 7:47 PM
    eternalkpflash sucks? please I am not sure what android is doing. this sucks for a lot of peoplei love adobe flash. believe it or not, a lot of websites are still supporting flashand i don't think everyone will convert to html5 soon.i love how apple users quickly jumps in and credits apple for this nonsensethis is a step backward.i see some cool new features on my cousin's google galaxy nexus with jeally bean but i don't think i will upgrade my galaxy s3 to jelly bean when the day comes


    "I am not sure what Android is doing."
    Android is not doing anything. This is Adobe's decision.

    What exactly do you love about Flash?

    How is moving from a closed, proprietary software that requires licensing, to an open, standardized solution a step backwards?
  • 9 Hide
    Netherscourge , August 15, 2012 7:49 PM
    Once Youtube completely switches over to HTML5, Adobe Shockwave/Flash will pretty much be dead.
  • -4 Hide
    nitrium , August 15, 2012 7:53 PM
    HTML5 has lower video performance than Flash. My crappy netbook used to be able to play fullscreen video when it was flash based, but now that many sites have switched to HTML5, video is super choppy. How exactly is slower, "better"? Oh right, it isn't.
  • 3 Hide
    douglaskuntz , August 15, 2012 8:06 PM
    chomleeI have been noticing that many of the sites have been switching over to a different source of streaming. I am assuming this is because they are using HTML5 instead of flash.


    So, you're able to right click on youtube, and get the source for their HTML5 video player? The audio and video players are not written in pure HTML, and viewing source only shows the HTML, not the application code...

    I've also seen sites that have HTML coded so that you cant actually see the Image links when viewing source (preventing you from right clicking and downloading an image, OR from viewing source, and getting the image by it's direct URL, or through wget, etc).

    eternalkpflash sucks? please I am not sure what android is doing. this sucks for a lot of peoplei love adobe flash. believe it or not, a lot of websites are still supporting flashand i don't think everyone will convert to html5 soon.i love how apple users quickly jumps in and credits apple for this nonsensethis is a step backward.i see some cool new features on my cousin's google galaxy nexus with jeally bean but i don't think i will upgrade my galaxy s3 to jelly bean when the day comes


    Honestly, Flash has a metric tonne of problems. It is extremely resource intensive, even on current 4-core, 6-core, 8-core, 10-core and 12-core systems. And you can validate this for yourself. Switch youtube over to HTML5, and bring up a video that is HTML5 compatible. Watch your system load (Task Manager on Windows, Activity Manager on Mac, Top on Linux/Unix). Then, close out the browser, re-load youtube, set it back to Flash only, then watch the exact same video. I can almost guarantee that you'll be pegging at least 1 core at 100%. Java is the same way. Yes, it will run "Everywhere", but it wont run Anywhere well...
  • 4 Hide
    theabsinthehare , August 15, 2012 8:11 PM
    nitriumHTML5 has lower video performance than Flash. My crappy netbook used to be able to play fullscreen video when it was flash based, but now that many sites have switched to HTML5, video is super choppy. How exactly is slower, "better"? Oh right, it isn't.


    Slower isn't better. "Open" is better than "Closed."
    This is the first iteration of HTML to have video tags, performance will improve with time. Flash wasn't great when it first came out either.
    With Flash, Adobe chooses which platforms to support and which not to; Adobe chooses what features exist and who to license to; Adobe chooses what to fix and when to fix it.
    With HTML, you can watch those videos on anything that supports HTML, and the code is open and standardized.

    Moving from Flash to HTML5 is a big move, and there are some bumps involved, but "I don't want to because I might see some performance loss," is not an acceptable excuse.

    Quit being selfish and realize that moving to open standards isn't just about you, it's about the web as a whole.
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