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Fujitsu to Miss PC Sales Target Due to Weak Windows 8 Demand

By - Source: Bloomberg | B 14 comments

Expected sales target decreased by around a million units.

Fujitsu president Masami Yamamoto has blamed "weak" demand for Microsoft's Windows 8 operating system for its ailing PC sales.

Japan's largest IT services company stressed that it'll miss its annual shipment target for personal computers predominately due to the poor demand for Windows 8.

Yamamoto said PC shipments for the fiscal year ending in March are expected to fall short of an October estimate of 7 million units, which may be around the 6 million market.

Fellow PC manufacturer Acer, meanwhile, expressed similar comments regarding the operating system. Its president, Jim Wong, said that the learning curve for touch will see Windows 8 not being adopted by consumers quickly. He added that the Windows 8 interface itself could "dramatically delay adoption by consumers."

PC vendors' frustration has been echoed in official figures pertaining to Windows 8's commercial performance. While the platform's touch demand is strong, Windows PC sales in the U.S. during the four-week launch of Windows 8 decreased by 21 percent when compared to the same period a year ago.

Companies including Acer, Sony, Toshiba and Dell, among others have all expressed their doubts regarding Windows 8's future. It was recently revealed that the operating system has fallen behind Vista in regards of usage share.

 

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  • 21 Hide
    greghome , January 3, 2013 11:39 PM
    Solution: Continue selling laptops in Windows 7.....
  • 14 Hide
    wlachan , January 3, 2013 11:53 PM
    It has nothing to do with learning curve I am afraid. TOUCH is great for portable devices, but it has no place for regular computers. Why would I want to keep raising my arm and fingerprinting the screen when the mouse will do with lesser effort? Also, METRO UI is so poorly designed. Whoever pushed this crappy UI within MS should be ashamed.
Other Comments
  • 21 Hide
    greghome , January 3, 2013 11:39 PM
    Solution: Continue selling laptops in Windows 7.....
  • 14 Hide
    wlachan , January 3, 2013 11:53 PM
    It has nothing to do with learning curve I am afraid. TOUCH is great for portable devices, but it has no place for regular computers. Why would I want to keep raising my arm and fingerprinting the screen when the mouse will do with lesser effort? Also, METRO UI is so poorly designed. Whoever pushed this crappy UI within MS should be ashamed.
  • -4 Hide
    mstngs351 , January 3, 2013 11:54 PM
    Fujitsu execs point fingers to avoid taking blame. Check.
  • -4 Hide
    EnFission , January 3, 2013 11:57 PM
    Right I'm sure this has nothing to do with the fact that no one cares about Fujitsu as a PC manufacture, and that there are competitors out there who are just plain better.
  • -3 Hide
    bigdragon , January 3, 2013 11:59 PM
    Acer thinks there is a learning curve for touch while touch demand is strong. I know the insulated executives at these companies don't get out much, but how can they continue to completely miss that Metro is not designed to work with traditional keyboard, mouse, and touchpad? You need touchscreens to actually use it without going crazy! That is why demand there is strong! Traditional users without touch devices avoid Metro like the plague! Acer might as well stop selling non-touch computers if they want to stick with Windows 8.
  • 5 Hide
    s3anister , January 4, 2013 12:10 AM
    wlachanIt has nothing to do with learning curve I am afraid. TOUCH is great for portable devices, but it has no place for regular computers. Why would I want to keep raising my arm and fingerprinting the screen when the mouse will do with lesser effort? Also, METRO UI is so poorly designed. Whoever pushed this crappy UI within MS should be ashamed.


    Little slow on the Windows news, eh? Apparently, he was so ashamed he got ousted from his position as Windows President. /endsarcasm
    Link: http://www.tomshardware.com/news/steven-sinofsky-windows-tami-reller-julie-larson-green,19063.html
  • 4 Hide
    max fountain , January 4, 2013 2:22 AM
    Like in Ridley Scott’s “Prometheus” - Microsoft Engineers Deliver a Global Extinction Event to Their Own Creation – The X86 PC Industry

    “Ironic outcome” doesn’t do justice to Microsoft’s latest attempt at a contemporary UI known as Windows 8. That is, given the collateral effect it’s having on already anemic PC sales in this perfect storm of market conditions. Traditional platform PC Industry C-Suite execs are now pointing quivering fingers as they give an accounting to their board of directors. Any BOD worth its salt should really be asking these highly paid suits why they’ve kept doubling down on Microsoft this long. Were they counting on some sort of “great awakening” of global PC sales ignited by the advent another stellar version of Windows. If so they must of either been high or just plain stupid. The most appropriate plurality is…dullards. Stockholders should demand a public accounting of the true culprits in military tribunal fashion. Yes, the boards themselves are responsible. Most of those BOD dudes are retired old nerds trying for another shot. We deal with a parade of these guys in NYC attempting to sell us on their roadmaps almost daily. As the saying goes “No fool like an old one”. Oh mother, how true.

    Windows 8 is built around new “hip UI" reminiscent of botched cosmetic surgery (like the lady’s face at the restaurant you try not to stare at). None of us here on Wall Street were surprised this thing sank like a rock and we won’t go public until the end of Q1 when final numbers post. Perhaps the most ironic outcome is the benefit to our industry itself now that we can better predict investor risk based upon how tightly coupled any firm’s roadmap is to Windows 8. I’m referring specifically now to X86 CPU firms since they’re genetically linked to Windows.

    The Microsoft legacy of inflicting poor user experiences doomed the Windows PC since birth. A certainty once there were any other alternatives. The market began moving past the Microsoft PC the exact moment the first email was received on a smart phone. Today’s young mass market user only adds tech that is lifestyle enriching and that user makes a value judgment within the first 15 seconds of use. So given what we know of the Microsoft user experience history, what are their chances of giving the traditional or non-traditional PC an attractive facelift? One you don’t just stare at in disgust in a cloud oriented marketplace where all the other patrons are productive, happy and attractive? Don’t stare!

    EXIT-X86 Windows 8 Prison Blues
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kqio-PxEjHc
  • 5 Hide
    Testgamma1 , January 4, 2013 6:07 AM
    greghomeSolution: Continue selling laptops in Windows 7.....


    Damn right,.
  • -5 Hide
    apache_lives , January 4, 2013 7:36 AM
    Im loving Windows 8

    vote me down and everyone will know your just a hater
  • -1 Hide
    abbadon_34 , January 4, 2013 10:41 AM
    How about making a better and/or cheaper unit with Win 7 ? Is it really that hard to understand? People buy new hardware because they're old stuff ... is old and slow. Not because they want to learn a new way to do the same thing.
  • -1 Hide
    dominic1973 , January 4, 2013 11:08 AM
    window 8 is a joke! most pc uses do not want to touch a screen to use there pc and what happens when you sit back to watch a video or tv or play a game . you have to look at a screen with hundreds of finger prints totally taking away from your so say windows experience!. windows 8 only works on mobile devises that are in your hand dummies (or are they ?). i thinks bill gates wants us to all using tablets and notebooks as he cant be this stupid!!
  • -1 Hide
    Avus , January 4, 2013 3:11 PM
    Windows 8 can be a success if the stupid MS doesn't make Metro the "default" shell and FORCE people to deal with it. I actually don't mind Metro in Windows 8, I am trying to live with it. But if MS "give the option" to boot directly into desktop and/or show Start button. Many people and business will not be as hostile toward it.

    BTW, Windows 8 is a GREAT OS if you look pass the MetroUI. It is fast and light on resource. Again I HIGHLY recommend to take that $40 (or $15 if you can find a way ;p) Windows 8 Pro upgrade deal if you are using Windows XP or Vista.
  • 0 Hide
    apache_lives , January 4, 2013 11:23 PM
    ah stupid stupid people

    everyone seems to forget NO ONE liked XP when it came out even a year later and suddenly everyone loves it and uses it and forgets

    then we had Vista same deal, but then Microsoft releases 7 - the same on the outside with a blue theme and people like it what a surprise, no one realizes its the same thing

    and now we have 8, and a big surprise everyone chucks a fuss

    give it a year people will love it and accept it, iv only seen this trend going on for YEARS, its getting old, the amount of stubborn dinosaurs that wont accept change, you cant tell me you dont know a systems admin that wont move from Server 2003 and XP installs and avoids anything 64 -- think there weird? That is most of you out there NOW.
  • 1 Hide
    Anonymous , January 5, 2013 6:27 PM
    It is actually not that bad. A Service pack could bring back the classic start menu and give users a choice: whether to boot with classic start menu or the new fancy Metro UI one. Both touchscreen tablet users and PC users would be happy.