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Google Upgrades Internet Explorer With Chrome

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 17 comments
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Google has released a Chrome Plug-in for Internet Explorer in an effort to please those still stuck using Explorer for one reason or another.

Plenty of people are still using Internet Explorer 6 because their place of work won't upgrade to the updated version of Microsoft's browser. With the introduction of Chrome Frame, Google is looking to help employees move on without forcing their bosses to do the same.

Chrome Frame essentially transforms Explorer into Chrome by bringing an open HTML5 and other technologies to IE. Google engineers working on Chrome Frame say that the purpose is to help developers take advantage of the latest open web technologies.

"Recent JavaScript performance improvements and the emergence of HTML5 have enabled web applications to do things that could previously only be done by desktop software," wrote software engineers Alex Russell and Amit Joshi, along with project manager Mike Smith. "One challenge developers face in using these new technologies is that they are not yet supported by Internet Explorer. Developers can't afford to ignore IE — most people use some version of IE — so they end up spending lots of time implementing work-arounds or limiting the functionality of their apps," the trio continue.

Russell, Joshi and Smith go on to say that with Google Chrome Frame, developers can now take advantage of a faster Javascript engine, support for technologies like HTML5's offline capabilities and <canvas>, to modern CSS/Layout handling.

Peep the video below for more or check out Google's Chromium blog.

Introducing Google Chrome Frame

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Top Comments
  • 16 Hide
    Sicundercover , September 23, 2009 2:05 PM
    However it fails to address the real problem. Most companies havnt upgraded IE simply because of an Overworked, underpaid, IT staff. Many large companies here in the Silicon Valley are still running XP SP1. I have witnessed this on many occasions. With the simple effort it would take to put this on every computer, it would still be more simple to just update IE and or install Chrome flat out.

    A simple deployment is no longer a simple deployment once you have 2 guys doing this on over 300 PC's at 11 at night.
  • 10 Hide
    extreme-pcs , September 23, 2009 3:10 PM
    Errr... not sure what happened above. As I was saying... Amen to that. 1200:1 computer to technician ratio here. It's insane.
Other Comments
  • 7 Hide
    nukemaster , September 23, 2009 1:36 PM
    This is actually kind of cool.
  • Display all 17 comments.
  • 16 Hide
    Sicundercover , September 23, 2009 2:05 PM
    However it fails to address the real problem. Most companies havnt upgraded IE simply because of an Overworked, underpaid, IT staff. Many large companies here in the Silicon Valley are still running XP SP1. I have witnessed this on many occasions. With the simple effort it would take to put this on every computer, it would still be more simple to just update IE and or install Chrome flat out.

    A simple deployment is no longer a simple deployment once you have 2 guys doing this on over 300 PC's at 11 at night.
  • 3 Hide
    extreme-pcs , September 23, 2009 3:08 PM
    Amen t
  • 10 Hide
    extreme-pcs , September 23, 2009 3:10 PM
    Errr... not sure what happened above. As I was saying... Amen to that. 1200:1 computer to technician ratio here. It's insane.
  • -1 Hide
    ssalim , September 23, 2009 3:25 PM
    Awesome, google.
  • 8 Hide
    SAL-e , September 23, 2009 3:50 PM
    sicundercoverHowever it fails to address the real problem. Most companies havnt upgraded IE simply because of an Overworked, underpaid, IT staff. Many large companies here in the Silicon Valley are still running XP SP1. I have witnessed this on many occasions. With the simple effort it would take to put this on every computer, it would still be more simple to just update IE and or install Chrome flat out. A simple deployment is no longer a simple deployment once you have 2 guys doing this on over 300 PC's at 11 at night.

    You right and that is why Google's solution is brilliant. See when the employee visit a web page that has the meta tag set it will trigger the IE's automatic install of the needed plug-in. Unless the IT stuff has setup a policy that prevents the plug-in to be installed, all employees who needs HTML5 will get "upgraded" without any assistance from IT guys. Only problem I see is MS releasing and IE update that black-lists the Chrome Plug-in. If MS does that I can bet that European Commission will go after them with even bigger fine this time.
  • 0 Hide
    Major7up , September 23, 2009 4:33 PM
    Sal-e, sicundercover is closer to reality with his statement than you may think. Having worked in IT for years and witness to the very scenarios described I can attest to the delicateness of the situation. Most places that are stuck on IE are indeed due to manpower and budget constraints but in most cases also have implemented security policies which do not allow for plug-in installation and which cannot be over-ridden. Though the Chrome Frame idea is a great one, I see limited potential use. I am currently a web developer and see no reason to run out and support this yet. It may be interesting to test, but let's not all jump for joy until we start seeing some applications of this and see how companies/users are reacting to it.
  • 0 Hide
    SAL-e , September 23, 2009 5:06 PM
    major7upSal-e, sicundercover is closer to reality with his statement than you may think. Having worked in IT for years and witness to the very scenarios described I can attest to the delicateness of the situation. Most places that are stuck on IE are indeed due to manpower and budget constraints but in most cases also have implemented security policies which do not allow for plug-in installation and which cannot be over-ridden. Though the Chrome Frame idea is a great one, I see limited potential use. I am currently a web developer and see no reason to run out and support this yet. It may be interesting to test, but let's not all jump for joy until we start seeing some applications of this and see how companies/users are reacting to it.

    Yes. I know. I am in the same boat. That is why sicundercover got +1 from me. At the same time I see the potential of Google's approach. I can change the security policy in my AD and then the users will get upgraded without my assistance. So if you are web developer and you need extra feature offered by HTML5 you could take advantage now instead waiting for MS and overworked IT stuff to upgrade the IE. If this framework become popular the web developers will need only to support one standard version of their apps. I really wish you to benefit directly from that.
  • 1 Hide
    michaelahess , September 23, 2009 5:21 PM
    Sicundercover and exteme-pcs, you just need to sell dumb terminals/terminal servers to the brass, a lot less trouble and maintenance ;)  And it saves money, and makes security much easier, and it's cheaper to maintain, and....well you get the point.
  • 4 Hide
    Regulas , September 23, 2009 5:21 PM
    Still waiting for Google to finish the Linux version of Chrome.
  • 2 Hide
    Hanin33 , September 23, 2009 7:07 PM
    working in a 600:1 environment, i can tell you the work installing this stuff is nothing compared to the time we'd spend explaining how to use it and why things look different than they would normally in vanilla IE6. seriously, our biggest daily issue is people being unable to print because they had a paper jam earlier and forgot to clear the job from the queue and now have 20 jobs lined up because they just kept pressing PRINT...
  • 0 Hide
    Hanin33 , September 23, 2009 7:11 PM
    michaelahessSicundercover and exteme-pcs, you just need to sell dumb terminals/terminal servers to the brass, a lot less trouble and maintenance And it saves money, and makes security much easier, and it's cheaper to maintain, and....well you get the point.


    that won't werk when you have convoluted accounting software that runs on .NET and requires desktop MS SQL engines... let's not forget the backend licensing issues that come from terminal serving...

    i really need to get out of municipal IT...
  • 0 Hide
    Pei-chen , September 23, 2009 7:51 PM
    What do you know, the page to enable Chrome is blocked by my employer.
  • 0 Hide
    i_like_pie , September 23, 2009 7:56 PM

    Being a web developer myself, I cringe everytime a new version of a browser, or a new browser all together comes out - nothing is more frustrating than having your css layout-based site look perfect in one browser, and fall apart in another - although things were supposed to be more consistent and standards based - seems to be going opposite! I hope this plug-in plays well with css . . . rant over
  • 3 Hide
    Anonymous , September 23, 2009 8:06 PM
    Internet Explorer 8 works great. I tried the chrome and I didn't notice any difference in speed and I uninstalled it because it has no home button to click on. Hard to get used to if you're used to IE
  • 0 Hide
    geof2001 , September 24, 2009 12:11 AM
    ..but i'm staring right at the home button.
  • 0 Hide
    Sicundercover , September 24, 2009 2:29 AM
    michaelahessSicundercover and exteme-pcs, you just need to sell dumb terminals/terminal servers to the brass, a lot less trouble and maintenance And it saves money, and makes security much easier, and it's cheaper to maintain, and....well you get the point.


    That would have been a lot easier 5 years ago, but with the current economy its tough to get a single penny out of the Execs. You can try explaining things to them all you want but they just glaze over.