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Intel 710 Lyndonville, 720 Ramsdale SSD Specs

By - Source: Engadget | B 57 comments

There's some ludicrous speed.

German computer site Computer Base obtained some unreleased information regarding Intel's 710 'Lyndonville' and 720 'Ramsdale' SSDs that are coming down the pipe.

The 710 is using Intel's 25nm NAND flash on a SATA 3Gbps connection. Those will come in 100, 200 and 300 GB varieties and will have read and write speeds at up to 270 MB/s and 210 MB/s.

The real interesting bits are about the 720, which runs on the PCIe bus. The PCIe bus interface alludes to some pretty intense speeds, but our jaws are dropping at the read and write speeds of up to 2200 MB/s and 1800 MB/s, respectively, noted on the leaked specs sheet.

These SSDs are set to hit until Q3, so it should not be too much longer until we have the official word (and test units) from Intel.

Discuss
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Top Comments
  • 14 Hide
    radiovan , June 19, 2011 5:02 AM
    tank2200 MB/s and 1800 MB/sWow... thats freakin awesome.

    You have not seen the price tag yet (~$3,000).
  • 13 Hide
    tank , June 19, 2011 4:30 AM
    2200 MB/s and 1800 MB/s

    Wow... thats freakin awesome.
Other Comments
  • 13 Hide
    tank , June 19, 2011 4:30 AM
    2200 MB/s and 1800 MB/s

    Wow... thats freakin awesome.
  • -5 Hide
    dogman_1234 , June 19, 2011 4:39 AM
    A couple of kilobytes of info thrashing? Wow, can't wait until it becomes gigabytes. One step at a time to better SSD's.
  • 14 Hide
    radiovan , June 19, 2011 5:02 AM
    tank2200 MB/s and 1800 MB/sWow... thats freakin awesome.

    You have not seen the price tag yet (~$3,000).
  • -2 Hide
    dogman_1234 , June 19, 2011 5:04 AM
    ^ Hehe...
  • 0 Hide
    vishal s , June 19, 2011 5:25 AM
    so fast.
  • -2 Hide
    knowom , June 19, 2011 5:29 AM
    If you use supercache/supervolume to utilize some of your system ram as a cache buffer around 512MB-1GB on SSD's or USB thumb drives you can do much faster speeds than that the quicker the system ram the better.
  • -1 Hide
    kinggremlin , June 19, 2011 5:32 AM
    25Watts? That's way beyond even 10 year old 15k SCSI drives. How did they manage to make it consume that much power?
  • 2 Hide
    tallpaul02 , June 19, 2011 5:42 AM
    so why are they not making a competitive sataIII ssd? the 510 series is not competitive with the ~500-550MB/s drives on the market and the 710/720 are way below and way above them respectively. seem to be missing out on a pretty big opportunity there.
  • 6 Hide
    tallpaul02 , June 19, 2011 6:06 AM
    reprotectedSATA II is way more than enough to suffice. In fact, even the 720 doesn't need SATA III (though it's released only for the PCIe slot).
    um...no? sata2 has a theoretical limit of 300MB/s and sata3 has such of 600MB/s. subtract out the difference between theoretical limits and actual performance and no, sata2 is not anywhere near enough. how do you figure 2200 read and 1800 write is going to happen on a 300MB/s interface?
  • 9 Hide
    bin1127 , June 19, 2011 6:14 AM
    so the pci-e drive will be bootable? I'd buy that. I just have to check with my golden goose.
  • -2 Hide
    radiovan , June 19, 2011 6:30 AM
    tallpaul02um...no? sata2 has a theoretical limit of 300MB/s and sata3 has such of 600MB/s. subtract out the difference between theoretical limits and actual performance and no, sata2 is not anywhere near enough. how do you figure 2200 read and 1800 write is going to happen on a 300MB/s interface?

    Ehmmm, it states it right in the short article that it is PCI-E not SATA, unless I missed something you both have missed the point.
  • 4 Hide
    tallpaul02 , June 19, 2011 6:35 AM
    radiovanEhmmm, it states it right in the short article that it is PCI-E not SATA, unless I missed something you both have missed the point.
    reportected was saying that sata2 was more than enough. i was pointing out the problem with that statement (and the obvious reason they opted for pcie as a result.
  • -2 Hide
    iamtheking123 , June 19, 2011 7:36 AM
    So basically one of these is as fast as DDR3 1600 ram?
  • 6 Hide
    aaron88_7 , June 19, 2011 7:39 AM
    I love how quickly SSD's are advancing, but only because I don't yet own one. I'm still holding out until the capacity and cost per gigabyte comes down a bit more. If I actually bought one I'd be pissed because it seems in 3 months whatever you buy now will be completely obsolete by a newer, faster, and cheaper model.
  • -3 Hide
    jimmysmitty , June 19, 2011 7:58 AM
    kinggremlin25Watts? That's way beyond even 10 year old 15k SCSI drives. How did they manage to make it consume that much power?


    PCIe bus, thats how. A PCIe 2.0 x16 lane provides 150 watts of power while SATA doesn't. Its possible that the bus itself is unable to throttle power usage or in order to obtain those speeds, they need a minimal amount of power at all times.

    Still, 2200MB/s would be insane and this is probably geared towards servers mainly. It will probably be at least a 4x PCIe 2.0 as well.
  • 1 Hide
    Pyree , June 19, 2011 8:07 AM
    tallpaul02so why are they not making a competitive sataIII ssd? the 510 series is not competitive with the ~500-550MB/s drives on the market and the 710/720 are way below and way above them respectively. seem to be missing out on a pretty big opportunity there.


    Make sense since the performance is about 10x better, it use about 10x more power.
  • 1 Hide
    Pyree , June 19, 2011 8:08 AM
    kinggremlin25Watts? That's way beyond even 10 year old 15k SCSI drives. How did they manage to make it consume that much power?


    Sorry qoute the wrong comment shout be this one
  • 1 Hide
    rantoc , June 19, 2011 8:34 AM
    PyreeMake sense since the performance is about 10x better, it use about 10x more power.


    Indeed, likely Intel's with the 720 have made what Ocz did with their Revo Drive line. Tons of nands and several controllers linked together with a raid chip. If so the question is what raid level is used (hopefully something like raid5 since it can handle if one of the controllers die completely but more likely raid0 due to cost) and the bigger question - Does it support trim?

    Or the burst could be explained that intel uses a clever ram cache on the pci-e board, time will tell!
  • 1 Hide
    Gigahertz20 , June 19, 2011 9:09 AM
    Can't wait until I can get a several hundred GB SSD drive like these for $200 or less, I wonder how many years it's gonna take.
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