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Intel, Micron Team Up for 128Gb NAND for Future SSDs

By - Source: Micron | B 16 comments

Consumers should expect to see higher capacities and lower prices next year with the launch of Intel and Micron's 128 Gb NAND device.

On Tuesday Intel and Micron introduced a "world's first" with the announcement of a new 20-nm monolithic 128 gigabit (Gb) NAND device which doubles the storage capacity and performance of the duo's current 20-nm 64 Gb NAND offering. It was created through their joint-development venture IM Flash Technologies (IMFT) with the intent to cram more storage capacity into small form factor devices like smartphones, tablets, USB drives and SSDs.

According to the report, the new device has the capability of storing 1 terabit of data in a single fingertip-size package with just eight die. For consumers, a 128 Gb device translates to 16 GB of storage. Stack eight of these in a single package and you have a memory chip packing a meaty 128 GB of storage capacity.

The new device is also reportedly the first to use a planar cell structure that "breaks the scaling constraints of standard floating gate NAND" by integrating the first Hi-K/metal gate stack on NAND production. It even meets the high-speed ONFI 3.0 specification to achieve speeds of 333 megatransfers per second (MT/s).

"As portable devices get smaller and sleeker, and server demands increase, our customers look to Micron for innovative new storage technologies and system solutions that meet these challenges," said Glen Hawk, vice president of Micron's NAND Solutions Group. "Our collaboration with Intel continues to deliver leading NAND technologies and expertise that are critical to building those systems."

In addition to the 128 Gb NAND device, the duo also said that their 64 Gb 20-nm NAND has entered mass production, and should enable a rapid transition to the 128 Gb device in 2012. Samples of the 128 Gb device are expected to arrive in January 2012 followed by mass production in the first half of 2012.

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  • 13 Hide
    TeKEffect , December 7, 2011 12:13 AM
    Lower prices. The best news yet from ssds. Don't get me wrong I've been buying them and I love them. But the cost per gb hurts.
Other Comments
  • 13 Hide
    TeKEffect , December 7, 2011 12:13 AM
    Lower prices. The best news yet from ssds. Don't get me wrong I've been buying them and I love them. But the cost per gb hurts.
  • 9 Hide
    drwho1 , December 7, 2011 12:13 AM
    "Consumers should expect to see higher capacities and lower prices next year"
    so... .50 cents per GB SSD's?
  • 2 Hide
    soccerdocks , December 7, 2011 12:23 AM
    drwho1"Consumers should expect to see higher capacities and lower prices next year"so... .50 cents per GB SSD's?


    Probably, but its gonna have to be on a black Friday/cyber Monday sale.
  • 1 Hide
    drumsrule786 , December 7, 2011 12:30 AM
    I'm planning on building a new PC in about a year and half hopefully this kind of stuff will make SSD's really cheap by that time because I am definitely going to put one in my new build
  • 3 Hide
    alidan , December 7, 2011 2:33 AM
    ill believe cheaper prices when i see them, and no i dont consider a 1-10 cent lower price cheaper, i would consider it a joke.
  • 1 Hide
    nikorr , December 7, 2011 3:35 AM
    No bad at all.
  • 0 Hide
    theconsolegamer , December 7, 2011 6:19 AM
    alidanill believe cheaper prices when i see them, and no i dont consider a 1-10 cent lower price cheaper, i would consider it a joke.
    +1
  • 0 Hide
    hannibal , December 7, 2011 5:10 PM
    10-20% per year per GB... Don't hold your breath too long. Well they are going to be cheaper, but so slowly. But yeah you are right we sill see older generation SSD near 50 cents, maybe not in the next year, but maybe the next after that.
    In anyway, my next build will have SSD boot... how big remains to seen. It is so much faster than normar HD, now it's just the capasity.
  • 0 Hide
    Zeknichov , December 7, 2011 5:12 PM
    Until prices hit $0.50 I consider them too expensive. I need about 200gb to run all my programs including OS and I would like to pay ~$100. That's the sweet spot.
  • 0 Hide
    alidan , December 7, 2011 5:24 PM
    ZeknichovUntil prices hit $0.50 I consider them too expensive. I need about 200gb to run all my programs including OS and I would like to pay ~$100. That's the sweet spot.

    i considered them to expensive to, till my hdd got accessed by a program so hard that it went from a 120mb read to a sub 1mb read, and every thing became far to unresponsive. hell that alone made me go ssd, than i started to put together exactly what i asked of my computer, and realized that much of the slowness came from a heavy load.

    i found an 120gb intel drive for 1$ a gb, and jumped on it, its a cristmas present though, so ill have to wait a bit to get my hands on it.
  • 0 Hide
    A Bad Day , December 7, 2011 8:54 PM
    hannibal10-20% per year per GB... Don't hold your breath too long. Well they are going to be cheaper, but so slowly. But yeah you are right we sill see older generation SSD near 50 cents, maybe not in the next year, but maybe the next after that.In anyway, my next build will have SSD boot... how big remains to seen. It is so much faster than normar HD, now it's just the capasity.

    spot.[/citation]
    A "slow" SSD will always run around the fastest HDDs in circles, unless if there are mainstream 60,000+ HDDs.

    A "slow" 128 GB SSD will also outdo a HDD and "fast" 64 GB SSD when it comes to reading/writing 128 GB of files, especially if they're small files.
  • 0 Hide
    A Bad Day , December 7, 2011 10:34 PM
    Bah, I meant "60,000+ RPM HDDs"
  • 0 Hide
    alidan , December 7, 2011 11:57 PM
    ok, can someone try to find this out for me, how big the ssd flash chips are, i want to try to do some math to figure out the base cost of these. things
  • 0 Hide
    alidan , December 8, 2011 2:53 AM
    ok, im doing this math off of a intel 510 120gb
    it comes in at about 2.3$ per gb
    i also believe they are on a 25nm process

    assuming a silicon wafer costs 50k to produce on its own, and you get about 16gb per chip, 1 wafer 21,739gb

    and lets also assume that 10nm is the lowest you can go, just to make the math easier.

    moving down to a 10nm process from 25nm would yeild 5.25 as many chips, and if lets say 5nm were possible, you would get about 24 times as many chips,

    now lets go best case scenario here.
    10nm preice per gb would be .44 cents a gb
    and at 5nm, price per gb would be .9

    these processes are a good 5-10 years out minimum, unless extreme demand for ssds kicks in, but currently hdds, pre flood, were 3.5 cents per gb, and takeing floods out of the equation, that number is only going down.

    if i knew the size of a 16gb chip, i could figure out about how much of a premium ssds have, and see how much they could cut, but im doubting anyone has that information.
  • 0 Hide
    Solariis , May 1, 2012 9:35 PM
    Prices are already at $1/Gb as of April 2012 on many sales. I guarantee you will see $.50/GB within the year 2012, but most likely they will be older or slower models and on sale. I can certainly see 128GB Sata III models on black friday for around $65 by this Thanksgiving.
  • 0 Hide
    Solariis , July 6, 2012 2:31 PM
    Only 2 months after my last post, I have found already found an SSD for $0.67/GB. Took a screenshot of the sale on Newegg:

    http://img513.imageshack.us/img513/8533/ssdy.jpg