Hands-on: Razer Edge is a Whole New Class of Device

The Razer Edge is a whole new class of device. That's what I told the team after spending some hands-on time with the Windows 8 Pro gaming tablet during a private showing Wednesday night. Just like the Oculus Rift which we saw in another private showing just two hours later, I expected to be blown away by Razer's new product, and I wasn't disappointed whatsoever.

We've covered the hardware specs for quite some time, so there's no need to really re-hash the subject. But as a brief recap, the Core i5-based Razer Edge will start at $999 and the Core i7-based Razer Edge Pro will start at $1299. Both run Windows 8 Pro, and feature Nvidia's GT640M LE GPU, a USB 3.0 port, SSD-based storage and more.

The Razer Edge is seemingly a re-imagining of a mid-range all-in-one (AIO) PC, sporting enough x86-based horsepower under its 10-inch screen to cough up 59fps in Bethesda's Dishonored using the default settings and a 1366 x 768 resolution. The Razer Edge isn't iPad thin, and its form factor reminded me of the first Kindle Fire, only substantially larger.

In an AIO scenario, Razer shoved the Edge in the optional $80 dock and attached a Razer gaming keyboard and mouse. Dishonored played just as one would expect if it were running on an actual desktop, whereas the Razer Edge unit slapped into the optional $250 gamepad attachment proved more challenging based on the fact that users must move and "mouselook" using thumbsticks instead – console junkies should feel right at home.

That said, the Razer Edge was again surprisingly light even when crammed into the gamepad accessory. Holding the device felt similar to holding a gaming steering wheel with straight handles rather than curved ones, but fatigue could possibly set in after a few hours of play (it's not a Nintendo 3DS, after all). That's where the optional docking station comes into play.

With the tablet docked in front of an HDTV, gamers can dial up a USB or Bluetooth-based gamepad and forgo the handheld solution altogether. However one of my biggest beefs with the tablet thus far is a lack of a native HDMI output port on the tablet itself – this feature is only available through the dock, thus pushing customers to tack on another $$80 on top of their original tablet purchase.

All in all, we were impressed with the Razer Edge based on the little time we had to fondle the device. The $200 keyboard dock won't be out until 3Q13, and there was mention that it may undergo a few changes before it hits the market. But all else displayed in Razer's private showing was pure excellence -- probably one of the best devices shown at CES this year.

We look forward to getting our hands on the device again to do a thorough review (with benchmarks) at a later date.

 

 

 

 

 

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  • This is one of the most useless devices I have ever heard of. It is basically a very expensive tablet--without all of the conveniences of a tablet!! If you use it without the dock, you are pretty much just holding a heavy tablet in your hands that will no doubt be uncomfortable to game with. Not to mention that the battery life is probably not very good either, considering the specs in it. If you use the dock, then basically you have a very expensive netbook that can play games. Why not just use the money to buy a proper gaming laptop if you're gonna be using the dock at a desk anyway?? Think about it: for $1299 + $80 = $1379, just add a couple hundred more dollars and you can buy a decent MSI gaming laptop, which will give you a better and larger screen, better processor and graphics card, more storage space, more ports, and an optical drive! And if you buy the gamepad accessory, that pushes the price to $1299 + $250 = $1549, not to mention that it relegates you to some sort of limbo zone where you're not quite gaming on a PC (due to the use of the thumbsticks), but not gaming on a console either (which costs much less to buy)! On top of all that, for serious gamers, the technology will likely be outdated by the time it even comes out for sale! You won't be able to upgrade it later either!

    I'll admit that the concept is cool on paper, but realistically, I'd rather put the money into building a nice gaming desktop, or purchasing a decent gaming laptop if I wanted the portability.
    10
  • Other Comments
  • This is one of the most useless devices I have ever heard of. It is basically a very expensive tablet--without all of the conveniences of a tablet!! If you use it without the dock, you are pretty much just holding a heavy tablet in your hands that will no doubt be uncomfortable to game with. Not to mention that the battery life is probably not very good either, considering the specs in it. If you use the dock, then basically you have a very expensive netbook that can play games. Why not just use the money to buy a proper gaming laptop if you're gonna be using the dock at a desk anyway?? Think about it: for $1299 + $80 = $1379, just add a couple hundred more dollars and you can buy a decent MSI gaming laptop, which will give you a better and larger screen, better processor and graphics card, more storage space, more ports, and an optical drive! And if you buy the gamepad accessory, that pushes the price to $1299 + $250 = $1549, not to mention that it relegates you to some sort of limbo zone where you're not quite gaming on a PC (due to the use of the thumbsticks), but not gaming on a console either (which costs much less to buy)! On top of all that, for serious gamers, the technology will likely be outdated by the time it even comes out for sale! You won't be able to upgrade it later either!

    I'll admit that the concept is cool on paper, but realistically, I'd rather put the money into building a nice gaming desktop, or purchasing a decent gaming laptop if I wanted the portability.
    10
  • 318292 said:
    This is one of the most useless devices I have ever heard of. It is basically a very expensive tablet--without all of the conveniences of a tablet!! If you use it without the dock, you are pretty much just holding a heavy tablet in your hands that will no doubt be uncomfortable to game with. Not to mention that the battery life is probably not very good either, considering the specs in it. If you use the dock, then basically you have a very expensive netbook that can play games. Why not just use the money to buy a proper gaming laptop if you're gonna be using the dock at a desk anyway?? Think about it: for $1299 + $80 = $1379, just add a couple hundred more dollars and you can buy a decent MSI gaming laptop, which will give you a better and larger screen, better processor and graphics card, more storage space, more ports, and an optical drive! And if you buy the gamepad accessory, that pushes the price to $1299 + $250 = $1549, not to mention that it relegates you to some sort of limbo zone where you're not quite gaming on a PC (due to the use of the thumbsticks), but not gaming on a console either (which costs much less to buy)! On top of all that, for serious gamers, the technology will likely be outdated by the time it even comes out for sale! You won't be able to upgrade it later either! I'll admit that the concept is cool on paper, but realistically, I'd rather put the money into building a nice gaming desktop, or purchasing a decent gaming laptop if I wanted the portability.

    I agree.
    I think the whole concept is a silly idea, it won't be a comfortable experience, it'll be expensive and won't last very long in terms of battery life. PSPs already do the hand-held gaming job. PC games aren't called "PC games" for nothing.
    I mean really, who is actually going to play Crysis or BF3 on one of those, wait --more importantly, will it even be able to actually run PC games? I can only imagine how hot that thing will get whilst gaming. :lol:
    3
  • For $1k we're going to need a little higher res screen there.
    4