Audi Uses Nuance's Speech Engine in New A3 Model

The vehicle will be integrating the company's Dragon Drive! Messaging as the technology behind Audi's connect Messaging service that enables text message dictation while driving.

"The in-car experience is quickly evolving from simply keeping drivers entertained to keeping them connected and productive in safer, smarter ways," said Arnd Weil, vice president and general manager, automotive, Nuance Mobile, in a prepared statement." Dragon Drive! Messaging’s flexible and customizable architecture enables world-leading automotive brands like Audi to deeply integrate powerful voice capabilities as part of their unique in-car experience, without compromising quality or adding dangerous distractions."

While Audi has confirmed that it will bring both the sedan and five-door hatchback ("sportback") versions of the A3 to the U.S. for the 2014 model year, it is unclear whether the text messaging engine will make it as well as Nuance said that it will "initially support several European languages" at the end of this year. When the A3 arrives in the U.S., expect at least three different engine options, including turbocharged four-cylinders with 220 hp and 300 hp, as well as a turbo diesel with 150 hp. Prices should start just under $29,000.

 

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  • husker
    Although speech to text is undoubtedly safer than fumbling with a phone, why should we just assume that there is no safety hazard? Is there any evidence that it is the same as talking on a hands free phone? The assumption is that it is safe, but where is the evidence?
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  • beenthere
    Any driver distractions are a very bad thing IMO.
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  • _Cubase_
    huskerAlthough speech to text is undoubtedly safer than fumbling with a phone, why should we just assume that there is no safety hazard? Is there any evidence that it is the same as talking on a hands free phone? The assumption is that it is safe, but where is the evidence?


    Well, we could consider that when someone is texting (while driving) they sacrifice one hand and both their eyes intermittently to do it. Where as voice commanding still leaves both hands on the wheel, and both eyes on the road. That's not to say either way is not a compromise on safety, but I'd rather ride with the person who merely talking to the car, rather than a intermittently one armed blind man!
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