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Intel Broadwell Chip Release Pushed Back to 1Q 2014

By - Source: CNET | B 44 comments

The company has pushed back Broadwell's release into 1Q 2014.

CNET reports that during a call discussing Intel's third-quarter earnings, CEO Brian Krzanich said that the company will begin production on Broadwell in the first quarter of 2014 instead of the final quarter of 2013. He said the delay is caused by a "defect density issue" that impacts the number of usable chips, or yields.

Typically, when defects are discovered, Intel implements a set of fixes and then moves on to mass production. However, in the case of Broadwell, the fixes didn't deliver all the improvements Intel had anticipated. Intel now believes the correct batch of fixes are in place, and the company should go into mass production sometime in the next quarter.

"We have confidence the problem is fixed because we have data it is fixed," he said. "This happens sometimes in development phases like this. That's why we moved it a quarter. [Intel and its PC partners] have a strong desire to get Broadwell to market. If I could, there'd be nothing slowing me down. This is a small blip in the schedule, and we'll continue on from here."

Skylake, the PC chip to follow Broadwell, won't be delayed, he said.

On Tuesday, Intel reported better than expected revenue for its third-quarter earnings, but is keeping a cautious eye on the fourth quarter. Intel reported $3 billion, or 58 cents a share, on revenue of $13.5 billion, flat from the same quarter from a year ago. Wall Street actually expected to see less: 53 cents a share on revenue of $13.46 billion. Intel reported that its data center group was up 12.2 percent from a year ago, and its PC client group was down 3.5 percent.

Intel was likely counting on Broadwell to push its PC client group up in revenue for the fourth quarter and first quarter of 2014, but now the company is seeing a delay. Broadwell is based on the same architecture used in Haswell, allowing PC builders to rip out their Haswell chip for the newer model. "Broadwell and Haswell are pin compatible, so for the most part this will slide into existing systems," Krzanich said.

Intel's Broadwell chip is expected to make devices even faster, thinner and lighter than the previous generation, as well as boost device battery life. The chip is the first to be manufactured using the 14 nm processing technology, reportedly putting the company at least a year ahead of its rivals. Intel is promising to go even smaller, down to 7 nm, allowing the company to pack even more transistors onto each chip, making them more powerful while draining less battery charge or power.

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  • 14 Hide
    Memnarchon , October 16, 2013 12:02 PM
    The title is misleading. The production was pushed back and not the release...
  • 10 Hide
    coolitic , October 16, 2013 12:15 PM
    I read this right after the article of Windows 8 Ends Support In 2 Years.
    Both articles have misleading titles and tomshardware needs to fix it.
Other Comments
  • -7 Hide
    xaephod , October 16, 2013 12:00 PM
    We have any info on the Broadwell chips and how they will compare to Haswell?
  • 14 Hide
    Memnarchon , October 16, 2013 12:02 PM
    The title is misleading. The production was pushed back and not the release...
  • 4 Hide
    spookyman , October 16, 2013 12:06 PM
    so will it have the a solder on cap or the thick paste they used.
  • 4 Hide
    anxiousinfusion , October 16, 2013 12:08 PM
    "Skylake, the PC chip to follow Broadwell, won't be delayed, he said."

    That's a pretty bold promise to make. How can he possibly be sure that something *won't* go wrong?
  • 10 Hide
    coolitic , October 16, 2013 12:15 PM
    I read this right after the article of Windows 8 Ends Support In 2 Years.
    Both articles have misleading titles and tomshardware needs to fix it.
  • 6 Hide
    rrbronstein , October 16, 2013 12:20 PM
    Quote:
    We have any info on the Broadwell chips and how they will compare to Haswell?


    i can guarantee a minor performance improvement of 5-10% hehe :) 
  • 3 Hide
    JD88 , October 16, 2013 12:32 PM
    Quote:
    "Skylake, the PC chip to follow Broadwell, won't be delayed, he said."

    That's a pretty bold promise to make. How can he possibly be sure that something *won't* go wrong?


    It's a lot less likely because it will also be made on the same 14nm process.
  • 4 Hide
    JD88 , October 16, 2013 12:37 PM
    Quote:
    I read this right after the article of Windows 8 Ends Support In 2 Years.
    Both articles have misleading titles and tomshardware needs to fix it.


    If you'll notice both of these articles have the same author.

    Kevin does this all the time. Embellishes or adds emphasis in places in order to make the article seem more relevant or newsworthy.

    He posted the Surface Pro article earlier which was also inaccurate in terms of content and mistakenly listed the Surface 2 as costing less than $100.

    This is not the quality journalism that Toms is known for.
  • -3 Hide
    dgingeri , October 16, 2013 12:39 PM
    Yeah, right, they're pushing it back because of an issue. The real reason they're pushing it back is because they don't have any competition and can slow down their development cycle and make more money from their current designs. Once again, we're stuck with slower advancement because AMD hasn't been able to keep up.
  • 2 Hide
    digiex , October 16, 2013 12:49 PM
    http://www.xbitlabs.com/news/cpu/display/20131015230058_Intel_Delays_Mass_Production_of_Next_Generation_Microprocessor_by_One_Quarter.html

    FTW!
  • 0 Hide
    bochica , October 16, 2013 12:54 PM
    I'll wait for a 100 picometer release.
  • -1 Hide
    cmi86 , October 16, 2013 1:02 PM
    Yay another die shrink...
  • 0 Hide
    amk-aka-Phantom , October 16, 2013 1:03 PM
    Phew, so Broadwell is NOT BGA only.
  • -1 Hide
    Pinhedd , October 16, 2013 1:04 PM
    Quote:
    "Skylake, the PC chip to follow Broadwell, won't be delayed, he said."

    That's a pretty bold promise to make. How can he possibly be sure that something *won't* go wrong?


    It's not the architectural change that is stopping them, it's the process change. Skylake will be made on the 14nm process just like Broadwell
  • 1 Hide
    ingtar33 , October 16, 2013 1:37 PM
    Quote:
    Phew, so Broadwell is NOT BGA only.


    not according to the source of the article... the author of this article is wrong. according to the source, broadwell is a mobile part only, desktop is getting a "haswell refresh" instead.

    http://www.xbitlabs.com/news/cpu/display/20131015230058_Intel_Delays_Mass_Production_of_Next_Generation_Microprocessor_by_One_Quarter.html

    Quote:
    Broadwell chips will only land into mobile computers next year, according to Intel’s plans. For desktops, uniprocessor servers and workstations there will be so-called Haswell Refresh microprocessors made using 22nm fabrication process. As a result, the volumes of 14nm products this year may be lower than traditional output using a new node.
  • 1 Hide
    InvalidError , October 16, 2013 2:02 PM
    Quote:
    Phew, so Broadwell is NOT BGA only.

    Well, Intel's CEO said PIN-compatible... and he only said that this MAY enable SOME people and OEMs to upgrade their devices. Lots of conditionals in there so it really sounds like he literally means PINs.

    Desktop Haswell uses LGA1150 but mobile Haswell are either BGA or PGA946/947. PIN-compatible = mobile/NUC/AIO/ITX/etc.
  • 0 Hide
    universal remonster , October 16, 2013 3:04 PM
    Quote:
    Yeah, right, they're pushing it back because of an issue. The real reason they're pushing it back is because they don't have any competition and can slow down their development cycle and make more money from their current designs. Once again, we're stuck with slower advancement because AMD hasn't been able to keep up.


    AMD has zero to do with this delay. Intel has much bigger fish to fry than them. Broadwell is about closing the gap in the mobile space where ARM dominates, not about 1 upping and pulling ahead of AMD's desktop parts. (Or in that case 2,3, or 4 upping them...) And had you been referring to AMD's up and coming mobile parts, I'd say they have a pretty compelling APU offering where CPU power can be traded off for more GPU power (tablets and such), making the "intentional delay" argument even more unlikely. I would gladly swap my Ivy i5 in my Surface Pro with a next gen AMD APU and pocket the cost savings.
  • 1 Hide
    none12345 , October 16, 2013 3:35 PM
    "I'll wait for a 100 picometer release. "

    I know that is a joke, but to be serious... 100 picometer is less then the diameter of 1 silicone atom. So, it'll never happen. A silicone crystal has a lattice spacing of 543 picometers. So your 500 picometer dream is here by destroyed as well!

    Suffice it to say a sub nanometer process isn't happening, not for silicone, and not for photolithography.
  • 3 Hide
    kinggremlin , October 16, 2013 4:46 PM
    Quote:
    "I'll wait for a 100 picometer release. "

    I know that is a joke, but to be serious... 100 picometer is less then the diameter of 1 silicone atom. So, it'll never happen. A silicone crystal has a lattice spacing of 543 picometers. So your 500 picometer dream is here by destroyed as well!

    Suffice it to say a sub nanometer process isn't happening, not for silicone, and not for photolithography.


    Silicone? Is Intel going to give up on CPU's when they need a sub nanometer process and switch to making breast implants?

  • 0 Hide
    David Towson , October 16, 2013 5:07 PM
    So production was pushed back, does that mean it'll be released to consumers later as well?
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