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G-Technology Intros New "Studio" Line of External HDDs

By - Source: G-Technology | B 5 comments

G-Technology is also using Seagate's new 6 TB hard drive.

Seagate's LaCie wasn't the only company releasing products with 6 TB hard drives. G-Technology introduced on Monday its new "Studio" line of external storage products, which consists of the G-RAID Studio and G-Speed Studio lines of external drives. This new family includes removable 6 TB drives, Thunderbolt 2 connectivity, hardware RAID and high-quality, sleek black enclosures.

The G-Speed Studio line is a four-bay storage solution with Thunderbolt 2 that supports user selectable RAID 0, 1, 5, and 10. This new line also features a sustained transfer rate of up to 600 MB/s in RAID 0, and four removable enterprise-class hard drives. The G-Speed solution can also be daisy-chained via dual Thunderbolt 2 ports.

"In a RAID 5 (data redundant) configuration, the G-SPEED Studio RAID can easily handle up to 30 hours of 4K footage in ProRes 4444 and can seamlessly edit three streams of compressed 4K," states the PR.

The G-RAID Studio line is a high-performance storage system with hardware RAID, and supports user selectable RAID 0, RAID 1 and JBOD. This model ships with only two removable enterprise-class 7,200 RPM hard drives, and promises transfer rates up to 360 MB/s.

"From lightning-fast transfer speeds to modern designs, we've approached our Studio series with the needs of today's editors, photographers, filmmakers and musicians in mind," said Mike Williams, vice president and general manager, G-Technology. "The Studio series is built to handle the demands of 2K and 4K workflows, and represents the next level in our constant evolution to better support professional workflows with performance, style and reliability."

The G-Speed Studio line will be available in May for $3,599.95 for 24 TB, $2,699.95 for 16 TB and $2,199.95 for 12 TB. The G-RAID Studio will be available in May for $1,499.95 for 12 TB, $849.95 for 8 TB and $649.95 for 4 TB.

Add your comment Display 6 Comments.
  • 0 Hide
    Sunday Afternoon , April 8, 2014 3:31 PM
    You might want to research who owns G-technology. I would be willing to bet that these are the HGST drives, not the Seagate ones.
  • 0 Hide
    MidnightDistort , April 8, 2014 8:29 PM
    Wouldn't it be cheaper to get an external RAID enclosure and put whatever hard drives you want in separately?
  • 0 Hide
    mcusuma1 , April 9, 2014 8:49 AM
    Installed the update; machine rebooted to a blank screen. Can see the cursor if I move the mouse, but it disappears when I stop moving it. Safe mode has the same issue, but I can see "Safe Mode" in all four corners. Had to do a system restore to get back in. Microsoft technician had no useful advice.

    Also I gave the "Start Screen" / Metro a fighting chance. For me, it's a huge PITA. Takes up the whole screen, unecessarily big icons, have to move the mouse a mile to get from one end of the screen to the other, horrible asthetics, and to top it all off, all of the "Apps" broke when I took full ownership of my drive, which I had to do because I couldn't even save a text file.

    Way to go Microsoft!
  • 0 Hide
    Draven35 , April 11, 2014 3:16 AM
    Quote:
    Wouldn't it be cheaper to get an external RAID enclosure and put whatever hard drives you want in separately?


    Yes, but is your external RAID enclosure manufacturer going to take a support call when you're in the middle of cutting a TV show and the RAID goes down? Because that's what these are for.
  • 0 Hide
    MidnightDistort , April 11, 2014 12:37 PM
    Quote:
    Quote:
    Wouldn't it be cheaper to get an external RAID enclosure and put whatever hard drives you want in separately?


    Yes, but is your external RAID enclosure manufacturer going to take a support call when you're in the middle of cutting a TV show and the RAID goes down? Because that's what these are for.


    I'm kinda confused here, if your RAID goes out.. if it was because a hard drive failure then that is up to the user to make sure they have their data backed up, but if the enclosure malfunctions then it's up to the manufacture to get it working for you again. If you got a RAID, you want to make sure that RAID is already backed up so if your RAID fails you can use your back up and try to get your main one fixed or replaced.

  • 0 Hide
    Draven35 , May 5, 2014 5:51 AM
    Point was: they are meant for pro use for things like editing 4k RAW footage, for people working in time = money positions. More likely than not, your IT guy would pull the RAID, put in the backup, and then call the vendor for support... and the IT guy's time is expensive enough that you don't want him messing around and trying to explain what he's doing with the configuration to a vendor. (Point is also: they are designed for a situation where there *is* an IT guy...)
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