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Google Cooling Entire Data Center With Seawater

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 51 comments

Any PC building enthusiast will know the merits of water-cooling. Now Google is taking it to the next level by water-cooling an entire data center.

In 2009 Google purchased a former building of a paper mill in Finland. Since then, the search giant has been hard at work designing a water cooling solution that would take the seawater into the data center and then channel it back out with minimal environment impact.

Check out the video that Google made on its new location:

Google Seawater cooling

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  • 17 Hide
    rantoc , May 26, 2011 9:28 AM
    mightymaxioWow thats pretty cool as long as the salt from the water doesn't rust the metal and electrical components.


    They will likely use a heat exchanger for a closed loop in the datacentre with a non conductive/corrorive fluid.
  • 15 Hide
    mortsmi7 , May 26, 2011 11:46 AM
    Ships use seawater to cool everything. Hell on pipes? Not really, sacrificial anodes made from zinc greatly inhibit corrosion, that and the alloy the pipes are made from. The cooling potential far outweighs the maintenance involved.
  • 15 Hide
    Murissokah , May 26, 2011 10:19 AM
    DjEaZy... and adding to global worming...


    I hope you are joking.
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  • 12 Hide
    mightymaxio , May 26, 2011 9:14 AM
    Wow thats pretty cool as long as the salt from the water doesn't rust the metal and electrical components.
  • -1 Hide
    Zeldazackman , May 26, 2011 9:27 AM
    First, I'd Like To State That Sea/Salt Water Does Hell On Maintenance For Pipes(See Alcatraz For Evidence), 2ndly If This Works, It Has The Capability To Become Like The Eco Nuclear power-plant Surrounded by Wildlife Protections, Which Can Be Not Only Awesome, But Could Also Promote Job Growth As Well :D 
  • 17 Hide
    rantoc , May 26, 2011 9:28 AM
    mightymaxioWow thats pretty cool as long as the salt from the water doesn't rust the metal and electrical components.


    They will likely use a heat exchanger for a closed loop in the datacentre with a non conductive/corrorive fluid.
  • -6 Hide
    BeCoolBro , May 26, 2011 10:05 AM
    When they clean these,they'll find huge algae monsters in their pipes if they use seawater.
  • 2 Hide
    Anonymous , May 26, 2011 10:17 AM
    Corsair's H99999O! :) 
  • 15 Hide
    Murissokah , May 26, 2011 10:19 AM
    DjEaZy... and adding to global worming...


    I hope you are joking.
  • -3 Hide
    ironmb , May 26, 2011 10:46 AM
    ZeldazackmanFirst, I'd Like To State That Sea/Salt Water Does Hell On Maintenance For Pipes(See Alcatraz For Evidence), 2ndly If This Works, It Has The Capability To Become Like The Eco Nuclear power-plant Surrounded by Wildlife Protections, Which Can Be Not Only Awesome, But Could Also Promote Job Growth As Well


    How long did it take you to type that? Trying to impress people with your caps lingo.
  • 8 Hide
    theJ , May 26, 2011 11:37 AM
    rantocThey will likely use a heat exchanger for a closed loop in the datacentre with a non conductive/corrorive fluid.


    Yup. However, corrosion would still be an issue in the seawater piping. But, it's nothing a few engineers couldn't figure out.

    Honestly this is pretty common. Any industrial plant near large bodies of water will often use that water for cooling. It's much more cost effective than using city water or ground water.
  • 15 Hide
    mortsmi7 , May 26, 2011 11:46 AM
    Ships use seawater to cool everything. Hell on pipes? Not really, sacrificial anodes made from zinc greatly inhibit corrosion, that and the alloy the pipes are made from. The cooling potential far outweighs the maintenance involved.
  • 13 Hide
    nebun , May 26, 2011 12:21 PM
    mightymaxioWow thats pretty cool as long as the salt from the water doesn't rust the metal and electrical components.

    the tubing is coated with some kind of glass or poliamide material....therefore salt water shouldn't affect it
  • -6 Hide
    valpanig , May 26, 2011 1:07 PM

    H8ff0000I don't mean this as some sort of personal attack or anything, but seriously, anyone who goes out of their way to type like that... At least people who ignore the use of punctuation and such aren't putting effort into purposely... I could say a lot of different negative things, but I think I've gotten my point across.

    How does seawater cooling of remote servers would promote job growth?
  • 9 Hide
    Anonymous , May 26, 2011 1:09 PM
    lol, you could have a million of these data centers spread out every mile across every coast and not affect the temperature of THE OCEAN by a single degree. Especially considering they try to cool the water back down before returning it. The only potential damage to the environment is any sealife that might exists near the "exhaust" portals of the buildings. Things like algae and maybe some fish might not like a small rise in temp. But anything beyond half a mile or so would never notice the difference.
  • 8 Hide
    mobrocket , May 26, 2011 1:12 PM
    sceen311Uhh, the last thing the ocean needs is More help heating up. One data center is one thing, but compounded by an increased use in the technology, they're looking at further destabilizing an already endangered ecosystem... but I mean who cares, really it's only the future generations that'll have to contend with with the numerous environmental issues we've already set in motion, we'll be fine probably till our generation dies out... probably.


    the impact this will cause is far less then if they used traditional means of cooling... techonology got us into this problem and techonology can get us out
  • 0 Hide
    Tmanishere , May 26, 2011 1:26 PM
    I hope they have a backup plan because there is going to be a on-going maintenance cost with this setup.
  • 7 Hide
    Marco925 , May 26, 2011 1:28 PM
    DjEaZy... and adding to global worming...

    hey, worms are cool.
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