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iFixit's Repair Manual for World's Least Repairable Notebook

By - Source: Engadget | B 41 comments

iFixit shows you how to repair your MacBook Pro with Retina display...if you dare.

If you happened to purchase one of Apple's shiny new Retina display MacBook Pros, you probably know by now that it is considered to be one of the least repairable laptops in the world.

Shortly after its release, DIY repair gurus iFixit tore down the device, finding unspeakable horrors such as soldered ram, glued parts, Pentalobe screws and irreparable display assembly.

Luckily for any unfortunate consumers without Apple Care and mountains of cash, iFixit recently released an in-depth repair manual with a grand total of 16 new guides detailing the most efficient ways to disassemble and reassemble the laptop.

The manual features 15 installation guides and a maintenance guide to go along with their two tear down guides. Of course, repairing the laptop and replacing parts won't be easy, and iFixit offers plenty of warnings before going down that road.

However, if you've got a brave soul and an itching for some adventure, head on over to the iFixit manual to perform things such as a DIY SSD upgrades, battery replacements or fan repairs.

 

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Top Comments
  • 42 Hide
    rantoc , August 11, 2012 1:10 AM
    I would "repair" it with a hammer and then purchase a real PC instead!
  • 32 Hide
    rantoc , August 11, 2012 1:24 AM
    clubsaucekillerLuckily you won't have to repair it, unlike the idiots who bought their lowest-bidder PCs.


    All electronic components in that computer have a failure rate, sadly i have to inform you that there is no such thing as magic silicon that comes without risk of failures. You think that PC is made from the best of the best because its expensive, seem you have much to learn about electronics manufacturing.
  • 26 Hide
    rantoc , August 11, 2012 1:32 AM
    nebunthat's what a closed minded person would do...very nice...noooot


    A closed minded person is one who purchases a laptop for 3000$ that only have one truly high-end component - the screen and that is what the entire line is marketed with with - At its price class it have below average performance because more powerful cpu/gpu/mem configurations are available from other vendors.

    Anyone who have an open mind would realize that there are more powerful configurations at that price-class to begin with, heck the close minded person buying it even have to purchase a thunderbolt -> Ethernet dongle at a "friendly" price after the purchase.
Other Comments
    Display all 41 comments.
  • 42 Hide
    rantoc , August 11, 2012 1:10 AM
    I would "repair" it with a hammer and then purchase a real PC instead!
  • 23 Hide
    Anonymous , August 11, 2012 1:11 AM
    I LOVE APPLE! NATURAL SELECTION AT ITS FINEST!

    YOU SEE AN APPLE CONSUMER (LOW FORM OF LIFE) YOU KNOW TO AVOID THAT PERSON AT ALL COSTS.

  • 32 Hide
    rantoc , August 11, 2012 1:24 AM
    clubsaucekillerLuckily you won't have to repair it, unlike the idiots who bought their lowest-bidder PCs.


    All electronic components in that computer have a failure rate, sadly i have to inform you that there is no such thing as magic silicon that comes without risk of failures. You think that PC is made from the best of the best because its expensive, seem you have much to learn about electronics manufacturing.
  • 26 Hide
    rantoc , August 11, 2012 1:32 AM
    nebunthat's what a closed minded person would do...very nice...noooot


    A closed minded person is one who purchases a laptop for 3000$ that only have one truly high-end component - the screen and that is what the entire line is marketed with with - At its price class it have below average performance because more powerful cpu/gpu/mem configurations are available from other vendors.

    Anyone who have an open mind would realize that there are more powerful configurations at that price-class to begin with, heck the close minded person buying it even have to purchase a thunderbolt -> Ethernet dongle at a "friendly" price after the purchase.
  • 5 Hide
    rantoc , August 11, 2012 1:37 AM
    nebunthat's what a closed minded person would do...very nice...noooot


    Edit - Bah double post!
  • 20 Hide
    bystander , August 11, 2012 1:54 AM
    clubsaucekillerLuckily you won't have to repair it, unlike the idiots who bought their lowest-bidder PCs.

    Take a look at these: http://www.electronista.com/articles/09/11/17/reliability.study.has.apple.4th.place/
    http://jdnash.com/2010/01/notebook-failure-rates/

    Seems Apple is behind a few other PC manufacturers. You have to remember, Apple does not build the parts on their products, they use the same manufacturers the others do.
  • 12 Hide
    idono , August 11, 2012 1:57 AM
    clubsaucekillerLuckily you won't have to repair it, unlike the idiots who bought their lowest-bidder PCs.


    No instead i toss the piece of crap in the garbage when it breaks down. While i can spend less than 1/10th of the price to fix my PC without actually waiting 1 month and have it break down 2 weeks later.

    My lowest bidder PC also has better and cheaper hardware than your branded computer that is about half as efficent.
  • -8 Hide
    itsnotmeitsyou , August 11, 2012 2:22 AM
    Retina does a few good things; It pushes the market to higher res screens, 1080 has been around for long enough. Its ideal for iPad(3) programmers who need native resolution programming without a 30" monitor (portability). it approaches ultrabook thinness, with mid line laptop hardware, and a full size interface.
    Its not for the 99%. its not for me.

    but its not a failure, its more of a rough draft, like the 1gen MB air, which helped spawn the utrabook market. Its "proof of concept" and pushing tech in aspects not valuable to 13 year olds.

    dont forget, its installed into a machined block of Aluminum, not some sheetmetal/plastic hotwheels box with lights. from a design standpoint, thats simply sexy.

    that said, its still not something I would buy.
  • -8 Hide
    itsnotmeitsyou , August 11, 2012 2:22 AM
    Retina does a few good things; It pushes the market to higher res screens, 1080 has been around for long enough. Its ideal for iPad(3) programmers who need native resolution programming without a 30" monitor (portability). it approaches ultrabook thinness, with mid line laptop hardware, and a full size interface.
    Its not for the 99%. its not for me.

    but its not a failure, its more of a rough draft, like the 1gen MB air, which helped spawn the utrabook market. Its "proof of concept" and pushing tech in aspects not valuable to 13 year olds.

    dont forget, its installed into a machined block of Aluminum, not some sheetmetal/plastic hotwheels box with lights. from a design standpoint, thats simply sexy.

    that said, its still not something I would buy.
  • 7 Hide
    hrhuffnpuff , August 11, 2012 2:58 AM
    At least my hand built abacus still works. Now that is a PC on the cheap.
  • -4 Hide
    rantoc , August 11, 2012 3:08 AM
    bystanderTake a look at these: http://www.electronista.com/articl [...] 4th.place/http://jdnash.com/2010/01/notebook-failure-rates/Seems Apple is behind a few other PC manufacturers. You have to remember, Apple does not build the parts on their products, they use the same manufacturers the others do.


    Find that list amusing considering that Asus usually is the "low price" brand in the list (beside Acer), choose the components wisely and quality will follow!
  • 7 Hide
    A Bad Day , August 11, 2012 3:31 AM
    clubsaucekillerLuckily you won't have to repair it, unlike the idiots who bought their lowest-bidder PCs.


    *RAM goes bad because laws of physics don't permit invincible silicon circuits*

    You're ****ed.
  • 7 Hide
    TheWhiteRose000 , August 11, 2012 3:57 AM
    Solution for this problem already.
    Don't buy a Mac, buy a PC or create a Linux Computer.
  • 11 Hide
    freggo , August 11, 2012 4:42 AM
    Simple solution... don't buy one.
    Basic 'repairs' or upgrades like memory, drives or batteries should
    be user serviceable without custom tools.
  • 3 Hide
    Solandri , August 11, 2012 5:28 AM
    rantocFind that list amusing considering that Asus usually is the "low price" brand in the list (beside Acer), choose the components wisely and quality will follow!

    Asus is one of the only laptop manufacturers to make their own laptops. They spun off their manufacturing facility (now named Pegatron) 5 years ago, but of all the brand names they're the ones with the closest relationship between brand name and manufacturer. They're actually one of the highest quality manufacturers, they just have both high-quality and low-quality models, and most people who buy cheap computers only see the low-quality models.

    Acer used to be in the same shoes as Asus, except they spun off their manufacturing division (Wistron) 10 years ago. The only others I know which manufacture their own are the Thinkpad line when IBM owned it (not sure what Lenovo's done with it), and the top of the line Sony models.

    There are probably a few more, but pretty much none of the notebook brand names make their own laptops. They're made by ODMs - Original Design Manufacturers. The Macbooks are designed and manufactured by Quanta. Quanta also makes most of HP's models, and a good number of Dell's. Apple, HP, Dell, etc. exercise creative control and specify what they want. But the nuts and bolts of the design and manufacturing work is done by ODMs.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_laptop_brands_and_manufacturers#Original_Design_Manufacturers_.28ODMs.29

    So it's really pretty silly to be comparing laptops based on brand name. If you want to compare quality, you should be digging to figure out which ODM makes the model you bought. Unfortunately, all the brand names are very reluctant to discuss it. When the unibody aluminum Macbooks first came out, there was a fascinating article about how Quanta had developed the aluminum milling technology and pitched it to Apple who agreed to go with it on the Macbook. But I've never been able to find it again.
  • 7 Hide
    mindless728 , August 11, 2012 5:28 AM
    The guide has one line:
    "sorry, you're screwed, go buy another"
  • 3 Hide
    richarduk , August 11, 2012 6:03 AM
    Seems to me Apple are making these hard to fix so they can screw more money out of the owners. The car industry have tried this in Europe and so far have been stopped. When are they going to wake up to Apple's anti market activities????
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