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Report: What to Expect From Intel 9-Series Chipsets

By - Source: Hermitage Akihabara | B 24 comments

The supposed 'final specifications' of some of the upcoming 9-Series chipsets have been leaked.

A report from the Japanese website Hermitage Akihabara has told us a number of things about the upcoming Z97, H97, and X99 chipsets from Intel.

Starting off with the  Z97 and H97 chipsets, these are largely identical, with a couple of subtle differences. Both of these chipsets follow the same principles as respective previous chipsets. Both of the chipsets are going to be wired to an Intel LGA1150 socket, which will allow them to support Intel Pentium, Celeron, Core i3, Core i5, and Core i7 Haswell processors, as well as the upcoming Haswell refresh processors.

Both of the chipsets will also be able to drive up to three independent displays (assuming the connectivity is present on your motherboard of choice), as well as have native support for the new M.2 PCI-Express based storage devices. Both of the chipsets will also feature a total of 14 USB ports (six of which are USB 3.0 capable) as well as six SATA3 (6 GB/s) lines.

The Z97 chipset will support CPU overclocking (when using Intel K-series processors, of course), as well as up to three graphics cards, all which will have to share up to 16 PCIe Gen 3.0 lanes.

The H97 chipset will not support CPU overclocking, nor will it support multiple graphics cards; only a single card with 16 PCI-Express lanes can be installed.

Moving on to the X99 chipset, we find half of the new HEDT (High-End Desktop) platform from Intel. This chipset will be wired to a socket LGA2011-3, which is built to support the upcoming Haswell-E processors. This chipset will be able to drive up to 10 SATA3 (6 Gb/s) ports, support CPU overclocking, and support up to four discrete memory channels. Regarding graphics, the chipset will be able to dedicate up to 40 PCI-Express Gen 3.0 lanes. As such, you'll be able to install anywhere from a single PCIe x16 graphics card all the way up to five graphics cards, giving each eight individual lanes.

To be clear about all this though, this is still unverified information. A number of websites are reporting these as the final specifications of the new chipsets, which while very well possible, is not something that we want to do just yet – so as always with rumors, do be sure to take it all with a grain of salt.

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  • 1 Hide
    patrick47018 , March 31, 2014 1:26 PM
    Looks very promising
  • -1 Hide
    zero2dash , March 31, 2014 1:45 PM
    I ran 3 22" on Z77X-UD3H while my PSU was being RMA'd (since at that time I couldn't use my 560Ti's); not sure why this is a "selling point" when it was already possible?
  • 2 Hide
    SirKnobsworth , March 31, 2014 2:11 PM
    Looks like the IO configuration on the H97 and Z97 is going to be the same as their predecessors - 6 USB 3, 6 SATA 3, 8 PCIe 2 with 18 ports total. I guess X99 adds 4 SATA ports but no word on how that interacts with FlexIO.I'm curious as to what M.2 has to do with the chipset though - isn't it just a socket which hosts otherwise standard connections? What prevents routing 4 PCIe lanes to an M.2 socket if they're not otherwise occupied?
  • 0 Hide
    lp231 , March 31, 2014 2:12 PM
    Saying the H97 can only install 1x PCIe x16 slot is incorrect, because on the H87, it also says the same thing, but there are motherboards running on H87 chipset and it has 2 physical PCIe x16 slots. They're not both wired to run at x16. One is at x16 and the other is at x4. http://online.bs/2013/06/27/intel-z87-motherboard-review-with-haswell-gigabyte-msi-asrock-and-asus/
  • 7 Hide
    josejones , March 31, 2014 2:18 PM
    Why waste the time even coming out with the 9-Series mobos if there's almost nothing truly new or beneficial. I am NOT impressed at all and neither are most others - the 9-Series isn't even enough of a performance increase to get anybody I know with a 2600 to upgrade. Intel, get back to us when you have something serious to offer with real performance increases. It just seems like little has changed in like the last 5 years.
  • 2 Hide
    SirKnobsworth , March 31, 2014 2:51 PM
    lp231: Usually the second slot on H87 (and some Z87) boards is actually PCIe 2.0 from the chipset rather than 3.0 lanes from the processor. Can you find any spec sheets which specifically say otherwise?
  • 0 Hide
    lp231 , March 31, 2014 3:17 PM
    Quote:
    Why waste the time even coming out with the 9-Series mobos if there's almost nothing truly new or beneficial. I am NOT impressed at all and neither are most others - the 9-Series isn't even enough of a performance increase to get anybody I know with a 2600 to upgrade. Intel, get back to us when you have something serious to offer with real performance increases. It just seems like little has changed in like the last 5 years.


    They might have done so, if AMD was still being competitive in the desktop segment. But seeing AMD has some what move their focus more on APUs, Intel doesn't see the need to release something with serious performance increase.
    If it wasn't for those Radeon graphic cards, I doubt AMD will survive this long just by selling on APUs, as Intel can just lower the price of their CPUs, and that will be the end for AMD.
  • 0 Hide
    undercovernerd6 , March 31, 2014 4:50 PM
    The Haswell e looks insane for multi gpu configurations 40 lanes of pci e up to 5x gpu @8
  • 1 Hide
    bak0n , March 31, 2014 4:59 PM
    I was actually hoping to see DDR-4 on this. The sooner it comes out the sooner it'll hit mainstream!
  • 3 Hide
    ekagori , March 31, 2014 5:32 PM
    It seems like my faithful 2500k will ride on for one more year until Broadwell and hopefully DDR4.
  • 3 Hide
    Draven35 , March 31, 2014 7:10 PM
    too bad it isn't set up for a native thunderbolt port.
  • 1 Hide
    universal remonster , March 31, 2014 8:04 PM
    DDR-4 has already been confirmed by Intel to be in X99/Haswell-E. How this wasn't reported, I have no idea.

    http://www.anandtech.com/show/7874/haswelle-8-cores-x99-ddr4
  • 1 Hide
    jojoguy10 , March 31, 2014 8:28 PM
    Nobody is thinking that this may be an April Fool's joke? Is it just me?
  • 0 Hide
    neon neophyte , March 31, 2014 10:51 PM
    and yet another intel generation goes by that does not entice sandybridge users at all
  • 0 Hide
    Drejeck , April 1, 2014 4:39 AM
    sandybridge user here. once again i'm not impressed.
  • 0 Hide
    ubercake , April 1, 2014 5:37 AM
    Intel seems to only have to add slight improvements each CPU gen since there is still no real competition. AMD is getting close though. I find myself waiting longer and longer to upgrade the base architecture on most of my machines until they make some real improvements. I guess this is a win-win situation as it saves me some coin.There are probably significant technological achievements made with each gen that consumers never even realize, but the bottom line is does it improve my performance enough to warrant an upgrade? This is another gen where it seems it won't.It's hard to get excited about something like that.
  • 0 Hide
    keyrock , April 1, 2014 6:09 AM
    Quote:
    It seems like my faithful 2500k will ride on for one more year until Broadwell and hopefully DDR4.
    Broadwell for mainstream processors won't happen until SkyLake, which will likely be 2016.
  • 0 Hide
    ubercake , April 1, 2014 6:11 AM
    Quote:
    Quote:
    It seems like my faithful 2500k will ride on for one more year until Broadwell and hopefully DDR4.
    Broadwell for mainstream processors won't happen until SkyLake, which will likely be 2016.


    2016 is probably the year for most of us to upgrade then. Save your $$$!
  • 0 Hide
    keyrock , April 1, 2014 6:14 AM
    Quote:
    Intel seems to only have to add slight improvements each CPU gen since there is still no real competition. AMD is getting close though. I find myself waiting longer and longer to upgrade the base architecture on most of my machines until they make some real improvements. I guess this is a win-win situation as it saves me some coin.There are probably significant technological achievements made with each gen that consumers never even realize, but the bottom line is does it improve my performance enough to warrant an upgrade? This is another gen where it seems it won't.It's hard to get excited about something like that.
    How exactly is AMD "getting close"? AMD is putting up a fight in the lower power variants, but that's mosttly due to the GPU half of their APUs being superior, though Iris Pro has narrowed that gap considerably. In the mid to high-en desktop chips the gap has continued to widen. So much so that Intel can afford to sit on their hands and concentrate on pushing into mobile. Vischera chips need to run above 5 GHz to even come close to competing with i5s, never mind i7s, in the majority of real world applications, and they do so while drinking considerably more power. AMD isn't even putting out a Kaveri FX chip because they know they simply cannot compete with Intel in that area until, at the very least, the Bulldozer based architecture has run its course and they put out something completely new.
  • 0 Hide
    keyrock , April 1, 2014 6:15 AM
    Quote:
    Quote:
    It seems like my faithful 2500k will ride on for one more year until Broadwell and hopefully DDR4.
    Broadwell for mainstream processors won't happen until SkyLake, which will likely be 2016.
    Oops, I meant DDR4 for mainstream processors /facepalm
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