Intel's Two Atom, Celeron SKUs for Low-End 2013 Market

The publication pointed to the current Atom flagship processors, the 32 nm models D2550 and D2500, which sell for $47 and $42, respectively, as well as the 32 nm Celeron M ULV models 847 (dual-core, 1.1 GHz), and 807 (single core, 1.5 GHz).

There was no confirmation from Intel, but if Digitimes' information is correct, the choices Celeron M ULV 807 and 847 are rather interesting. They are certainly not the most attractive processors in any view the company would be able to offer next year for desktops. While the 807 is the cheapest mobile ULV Celeron processor on Intel's price sheet today ($70), there are faster and cheaper desktop versions available: The fastest Celeron processors today (G550, dual-core, 2.6 GHz) sell for a tray price of $52, while the bottom end (G440, single-core, 1.6 GHz) is available for $37. Sure, lower power consumption is always desirable, but this is a premium feature that usually does not count as much as a few more megahertz in the entry-level market.

There are certainly several decent processors to fill Intel's low-end processor market strategy, but Digitimes believes that the aforementioned Atoms and Celerons will be kept alive by Intel at least until Q3 2013. By that time, we would expect Haswell to make a strong showing that will allow Ivy Bridge to assume the dominant role in entry-level CPUs.

 

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  • nforce4max
    Why don't they dump the prices even lower and subsidize the manufacturing costs with the high end?
    $20 dollar Celerons with boxed coolers would sell very well especially for those on a budget or just basic needs.
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  • blazorthon
    nforce4maxWhy don't they dump the prices even lower and subsidize the manufacturing costs with the high end? $20 dollar Celerons with boxed coolers would sell very well especially for those on a budget or just basic needs.


    Why increase the costs of the high end where there are fewer sales, meaning prices could need to jump significantly just to drop prices on these Celerons slightly? That doesn't seem like a good business model.
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  • nforce4max
    blazorthonWhy increase the costs of the high end where there are fewer sales, meaning prices could need to jump significantly just to drop prices on these Celerons slightly? That doesn't seem like a good business model.


    I didn't say exactly which high end, I am willing to assume that some guessed 2011 but they could very easily spread the costs over multiple models so that no particular model becomes overpriced enough for consumers to notice. Each sample usually floats around $20-$60 to manufacture depending if it is the dual core or the quad core model and if it used Indium for improved thermals.
    0