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Intel Promises Big Performance With Sandy Bridge

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 80 comments

The next big "leap ahead" for Intel.

We know that the next big thing to come from Intel is Sandy Bridge, which will be the biggest CPU overhaul since Nehalem.

Intel CEO Paul Otellini made mention of the upcoming processor generation, saying that it'll be the biggest leap the company's made yet in terms of processing power.

While Intel would never encourage prospective customers to hold off on a new PC – especially leading up to the hot holiday buying season – the CEO's enthusiasm for Sandy Bridge could give reason to wait until 2011.

In closing, I want to mention our next processor family codenamed Sandy Bridge. This quarter, we began volume production of Sandy Bridge and expect to ship revenue units in Q4 as we prepare for systems launch in the first quarter of 2011. Sandy Bridge represents the largest increase in computing performance in our history. This is a truly stunning product that we can’t wait to bring to market. Early demand from customers is much greater than we originally expected and we anticipate a very fast ramp.

Source: Seeking Alpha

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Top Comments
  • 23 Hide
    the_krasno , October 14, 2010 3:19 PM
    If this is as big as a leap like the one from Pentium to Core, I might have to give them my money. I still use an old Core 2.
  • 21 Hide
    teknomedic , October 14, 2010 3:31 PM
    Can't they say that about just every new generation of procs? I mean... in theory, each get is about double the one before it. I know this isn't as true as it once was. My point is that "P2 represents the largest increase in computing performance in our history"... "P3 represents the largest increase in computing performance in our history"... "P4 represents the largest increase in computing performance in our history"... etc, etc... should hold true in general.
  • 18 Hide
    ibemerson , October 14, 2010 3:26 PM
    We don't need no stinkin CPUs

    Better chipsets please!
Other Comments
    Display all 80 comments.
  • 12 Hide
    Emperus , October 14, 2010 3:18 PM
    I guess this answers to all those queries asking whether to hold on till the Sandy Bridge launch or to buy a system right now..
  • 23 Hide
    the_krasno , October 14, 2010 3:19 PM
    If this is as big as a leap like the one from Pentium to Core, I might have to give them my money. I still use an old Core 2.
  • 13 Hide
    pbrigido , October 14, 2010 3:26 PM
    That is an impressive claim. Let's hope they fulfil the expectations of the consumer and AMD isn't far behind bringing a more powerful CPU to the market as well.
  • 18 Hide
    ibemerson , October 14, 2010 3:26 PM
    We don't need no stinkin CPUs

    Better chipsets please!
  • 15 Hide
    Marco925 , October 14, 2010 3:26 PM
    Yeah, but it will be a promise for even BIGGER Prices!
  • 11 Hide
    g00fysmiley , October 14, 2010 3:27 PM
    so basically the saem advise we've been giving people on the forums for the past 4-5 months.. if you need a system now go for it, if you can wait sandybridge is right around the corner (as is bulldozer) and i'll be wating till both are out and benchmarked to buy one
  • 16 Hide
    chiral , October 14, 2010 3:29 PM
    I'm still unsure how Sandy Bridge will outpace X58 systems. From what I've read (and maybe misunderstood) it seems like the two CPU families are very similar other than a puny GPU built into the CPU. For enthusiasts, is this really that big of a deal?

    IMHO - Sandy bridge may be good for sub 800$ systems, since you won't need a separate GPU, but anyone looking to push the limits wouldn't benefit.
  • 21 Hide
    teknomedic , October 14, 2010 3:31 PM
    Can't they say that about just every new generation of procs? I mean... in theory, each get is about double the one before it. I know this isn't as true as it once was. My point is that "P2 represents the largest increase in computing performance in our history"... "P3 represents the largest increase in computing performance in our history"... "P4 represents the largest increase in computing performance in our history"... etc, etc... should hold true in general.
  • 9 Hide
    jimmysmitty , October 14, 2010 3:39 PM
    chiralI'm still unsure how Sandy Bridge will outpace X58 systems. From what I've read (and maybe misunderstood) it seems like the two CPU families are very similar other than a puny GPU built into the CPU. For enthusiasts, is this really that big of a deal?IMHO - Sandy bridge may be good for sub 800$ systems, since you won't need a separate GPU, but anyone looking to push the limits wouldn't benefit.


    There are going to be SB based systems that will not have a GPU built onto the die, specifically the K series that has a unlocked multiplier.

    In terms of performance, Anand had a review with some SB CPUs in a sort of Alpha stage and it was pushing 10-20% overall better performance than a equally clocked Core i7. With driver improvements and final silicon it could be higher than that. The SB to truly replace X58 based Nehalems though will come in late 2011 in X68 based systems on LGA2011.

    dylansalibaRamp shmamp, just keep trickling the tech down, milking us for every bit that we are worth...


    Yea if thats how you feel, you should not be a PC enthusiast. Technology always gets better. Should I be mad that LGs Ally is such a nice phone over the EnV Touch? Nah. I am glad. But you can't get everything for free.
  • -5 Hide
    Anonymous , October 14, 2010 4:02 PM
    I hope it will be able to play 1080P60 H264 Video from my Sanyo Xacti VPC-HD2000 smoothly with no stuttering or video audio sync issues!
  • 2 Hide
    sundragon , October 14, 2010 4:21 PM
    hmm... I remember when they added the FPU to the CPU with the 486... on graphics and specific apps, it made a HUGE difference or the first Pentium chips... if this is bigger, then it alone may not give us a huge leap, but future versions will.
  • 3 Hide
    LuckyDucky7 , October 14, 2010 4:24 PM
    And hopefully we can get BIGGER increases due to overclocking- but wait, you have to pay extra for the privilege with buying a special processor!
  • 3 Hide
    rhino13 , October 14, 2010 4:29 PM
    Hmmm... putting a GPU on-board will give you a lot more power on chip but will it give me anything I can't get with a discreet GPU?
  • 6 Hide
    TEAMSWITCHER , October 14, 2010 4:36 PM
    This is complete BS. There will be only a minor improvement (10-20% at best) with Sandy Bridge. Think about it...It uses the same 32nm process and has the same number of cores, so the improvement will be lack luster.

    I think that the real jump in performance will come when Ivy Bridge is released on the 22nm process. Notebooks will have 4 cores with 8 threads, and desktops will have 8 Cores with 16 Threads. Wait until Ivy Bridge or you will be very, very sorry.

    Don't listen to Paul Otellini.
  • 14 Hide
    compton , October 14, 2010 4:56 PM
    I switched to AMD for the Phenom II. While I have no doubts that Sandy Bridge will be a marked improvement, what I really want is AMD to get their stuff together to compete with Intel. Sandy Bridge will be big in the $200 - $300 (from what I've been led to believe) range and AMD isn't ready to compete with their current lineup. Which is sad. I'm agnostic as to AMD vs Intel, but if AMD can't compete that's bad for everyone.
  • 15 Hide
    Onus , October 14, 2010 4:58 PM
    I plan to build my next rig in the Spring, around the time I get my extortion refund. If Sandy Bridge performance is only 20% better, I won't care. I will care that it will lower the prices of perfectly acceptably-performing i5 and i7 CPUs.
    Then there's Bulldozer. I'm optimistic that Bulldozer will at least match i5/i7; since it will undoubtedly cost less, very likely that's the way I'll go, even if Sandy Bridge is 20% faster.
    Of course, I could be pleasantly surprised and Bulldozer will equal or beat Sandy Bridge, while still costing less. That would be sweet indeed.
  • 10 Hide
    theoutbound , October 14, 2010 5:01 PM
    While it would be nice in SB had huge performance increases, this is largely just marketing fluff right now. I'll wait for final hardware benchmarks before committing to a new socket and processor.
  • 10 Hide
    ikefu , October 14, 2010 5:02 PM
    If you keep stacking 5% increases then each increase is bigger than the last. "The biggest performance leap ever" is a marketing scheme.

    Now, I still look forward to it but the pricing is always a concern with Intel. If AMD can even at least match i7 with Bulldozer but with their usual prices of considerably lower than Intel I would still be interested. I'd rather not spend 50% more for 10% more performance and end up with an unbalanced system.
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