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Microsoft Watching OEM Bloatware for Windows 7

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 45 comments

Microsoft’s keeping an eye on the amount of bloat that OEMs will be loading into Windows 7.

We all love to build our own PCs and besides the cost savings, we like the feeling of having a virgin install of an operating system rather than one that’s been “customized” with bloatware. We’ve seen it all before on our laptops, when Windows starts up and the system tray fills with things we never wanted in the first place.

If Microsoft (along with the rest of us) have its way with Windows 7, useless and slow startup programs will be kept at bay from pre-installs.

“We're all about putting the stopwatch on how quickly a customer gets to a usable experience,” said Mark Croft, the director of Microsoft’s OEM worldwide marketing, in a TechRadar story. “With OEM pre-installed software what you'll see is a little bit of streamlining going on in the initial experience for the customer.”

While speed and responsiveness should always near the top of every operating system’s development goals, Microsoft is more sensitive than ever to how quick Windows 7 will feel.

After Windows Vista earned the reputation for being slower than Windows XP, largely due to increased security and other forward-looking features, many became frustrated with their overall computing experience. Users just saw Windows Vista as downgrade to XP rather than an upgrade.

Microsoft now is putting efforts into making Windows 7 much faster, working with OEMs to reduce bloat, and even smaller things such as improving the response of the Start Menu button.

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Top Comments
  • 22 Hide
    hijr22 , April 2, 2009 11:22 PM
    Good job Microsoft.
  • 15 Hide
    thedipper , April 3, 2009 12:10 AM
    moriconwoah, not microsofts place to tell OEM whta to do with the licences they and systems they build,if the manufacturer decides to add extra applications then they should do so, its up to the end user to decide which ones to keep, a lot of the bloatware is annoying but it is better deciding what you want to keep for free than never being given anything for free!


    It's VERY MUCH microsoft's place.

    OEMs loading overly slow bloatware onto a PC with Windows 7 means that unexperienced users, likely most of the market, are going to have bad experiences with Windows. Again.
  • 12 Hide
    Slobogob , April 3, 2009 12:57 AM
    Finally! We all know those pre-installed applications that are good for nothing and are only demos or trial variants and slow the system down to a crawl. The worst thing is actually that manufacturers advertise the "software" bloat as a feature that is actually worth money. Well, it isn't. Most of it is just junk. I really appreciate that MS is taking this step. It's overdue.
Other Comments
  • 22 Hide
    hijr22 , April 2, 2009 11:22 PM
    Good job Microsoft.
  • -3 Hide
    waikano , April 2, 2009 11:29 PM
    Now all you need to do is get rid of that nasty marketing scheme you are planning to push on us and we will all be happy.....6-7 SKUs......FAIL!!
  • -7 Hide
    ptroen , April 2, 2009 11:30 PM
    This could be a move just to ensure that the bloatware installed is MS bloatware. Unless MS puts more specifics this is more of a marketing tactic then anything else.
  • 5 Hide
    apache_lives , April 2, 2009 11:32 PM
    about %#$%^ time
  • -8 Hide
    Anonymous , April 2, 2009 11:39 PM
    woah, not microsofts place to tell OEM whta to do with the licences they and systems they build,if the manufacturer decides to add extra applications then they should do so, its up to the end user to decide which ones to keep, a lot of the bloatware is annoying but it is better deciding what you want to keep for free than never being given anything for free!
  • 10 Hide
    eddieroolz , April 2, 2009 11:44 PM
    moriconwoah, not microsofts place to tell OEM whta to do with the licences they and systems they build,if the manufacturer decides to add extra applications then they should do so, its up to the end user to decide which ones to keep, a lot of the bloatware is annoying but it is better deciding what you want to keep for free than never being given anything for free!


    You never get it free. You pay it in terms of speed and experience.
  • 10 Hide
    captaincharisma , April 3, 2009 12:06 AM
    no half to all of that useless software they put on there is trialware so while the software does have a use that use will be useless after a certian number of days. wish the OEMs allowed an option for us to install the OS ourselves. send me the pc with nothing on it and a copy of the OS and let me install it myself is all I wnat
  • 15 Hide
    thedipper , April 3, 2009 12:10 AM
    moriconwoah, not microsofts place to tell OEM whta to do with the licences they and systems they build,if the manufacturer decides to add extra applications then they should do so, its up to the end user to decide which ones to keep, a lot of the bloatware is annoying but it is better deciding what you want to keep for free than never being given anything for free!


    It's VERY MUCH microsoft's place.

    OEMs loading overly slow bloatware onto a PC with Windows 7 means that unexperienced users, likely most of the market, are going to have bad experiences with Windows. Again.
  • 5 Hide
    Anonymous , April 3, 2009 12:27 AM
    How about all that other crap that gets loaded after you install the OS? I can think of Java Updater, Adobe Updater, QuickTime and all sorts of other crap!
  • 6 Hide
    mpasternak , April 3, 2009 12:30 AM
    how many peple (typical users, not us) buy computers and think that "windows sucks, it's slow and takes forever to start" on brand new hardware?

    many i know of. Usually because of bloatware. Just recently got to test out an XPS system. Fresh from Dell. Vista took nearly 5 minutes to load. the user thought it was broken when he got it,

    Fresh install of vista later. the machine was quite fast and the user very very happy.
  • 4 Hide
    kamkal , April 3, 2009 12:46 AM
    bloatware blows

    brand new computer takes 5 minutes to start up and the user is bombarded with dozens of different prompts, retarded, get rid of that useless sh!t

  • 5 Hide
    Anonymous , April 3, 2009 12:49 AM
    We all know Vista is more than fast enough on a fresh install. I would love to see crap like the HP Customer Experience Program (aka, ad server) gone. As well as Snapfish, eBay, Acer eManagement, Vonage and the rest. Norton 360 finally got their act together but that's rare to see.
  • 12 Hide
    Slobogob , April 3, 2009 12:57 AM
    Finally! We all know those pre-installed applications that are good for nothing and are only demos or trial variants and slow the system down to a crawl. The worst thing is actually that manufacturers advertise the "software" bloat as a feature that is actually worth money. Well, it isn't. Most of it is just junk. I really appreciate that MS is taking this step. It's overdue.
  • 0 Hide
    hemelskonijn , April 3, 2009 1:26 AM
    This got me thinking ... why don't they just disallow OEM's to install bloatware all together ?

    In my humble opinion some stuff that was on the last "bloat ware free" system i bought is evil like for instance Internet security software that takes half of my resources when idle or the many system tray items that come with drivers.

    One obvious example would be the world of warcraft trial icon that ATI dumps on your desktop unless you specify you want to do an expert installation and deselect the installation.

    Why i need to get a popup from some lame app telling me i unplugged my headset (warps me to desktop to shop me the pop) is still unclear.
    And if you think there are plenty audio drivers without those uber panels think again.

    The list with crapware that thinks its important enough to start up at boot or worse a service and sometimes even a gaurdian service for that service is endless.
  • -6 Hide
    Anonymous , April 3, 2009 1:42 AM
    Generally they should expect the user to install at least 10 programs and 3 games!
    In my case I have installed about 90 programs total on my XP machine in the course of 3 years, it works slower, yes, but I also use all possible tools to make XP faster, like
    -DISABLE automatic defrag! Unlike many suggestions, Defrag generally scatters small files across the disk instead of keeping all small files belonging to a directory written together on one part of the disk.
    And keep defrag for a time when the disk starts to get full (say after 6 months), and you just backed up all data, and deleted all unnecessary data.
    -Disable themes!! (something I'd no longer be able to do on 7 I fear).
    -Disable automatic tasks, and background activity!
    -Disable adobe/msoffice accelerators. I only use Ms office and adobe once a week.
    -get rid of nearly 80% of the startup programs

    So far, it looks like Windows 7 boots fine, but that will depend greatly on the amount of programs installed.
    I dare to bet 7 will be below the user experience of XP as soon as more programs are installed!
  • 4 Hide
    Anonymous , April 3, 2009 1:44 AM
    Study for Start Menu speed??? Why?? Go into registry, change value to 0 instead of the 400 they ship it with and....tada!!! Instant start menu! Why do they put a delay into the start menu to begin with????!!
  • -4 Hide
    Anonymous , April 3, 2009 1:44 AM
    I think we all should go back to NT4.0, Win98 and winXP!
  • 5 Hide
    Shadow703793 , April 3, 2009 1:45 AM
    For those of you with OEM disks from Dell,etc that install the bloatware with every fresh install take a look at vLite (Vista) or nLite(XP/2000). They can remove the bloatware. Neat little tools. Lets you even slipstream Service packs.
  • 1 Hide
    Anonymous , April 3, 2009 2:45 AM
    Uh if they want to stop bloatware, how about they cut the price of Windows. The bloatware is on to actually turn a profit for the oems. Think about it.
  • 0 Hide
    radguy , April 3, 2009 2:55 AM
    Maybe the first thing I do with my next laptop wont be installing a new os. That would be nice. Almost makes up for the 3 program limit in starter.
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