Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in

Results: Grayscale Tracking And Gamma Response

AOC G2460PQU 24-inch 144 Hz Gaming Monitor Review
By

The majority of monitors, especially newer models, display excellent grayscale tracking (even at stock settings). It’s important that the color of white be consistently neutral at all light levels from darkest to brightest. Grayscale performance impacts color accuracy with regard to the secondary colors: cyan, magenta, and yellow. Since computer monitors typically have no color or tint adjustment, accurate grayscale is key.

In Standard mode, the default color temp preset is Warm. Our chart tells a different story. Grayscale errors are skewed towards the cool end of the scale due to excessive amounts of blue. If you don’t plan to calibrate, set the preset on User. That will drop the average error from 5.27 to 3.21 Delta E, which is a visible improvement.

If you have the tools to adjust the RGB sliders, use them. The result is well worth your time.

Except for a little spike at 10 percent, this is pretty close to perfect. As you saw in the previous section, there is almost no reduction in contrast performance when calibrating the G2460PQU’s grayscale tracking.

We now return to the comparison group.

A Delta E measurement of 5.27 is below average out of the box. At least there is relief to be had by switching the color temp preset to User or sRGB. Of course, calibration yields the lowest error of all.

Now that's more like it. A 1.09 Delta E reading is right up there with the best screens we’ve tested. And if you just compare the 144 Hz-capable monitors, the result is a wash. None of them display visible grayscale errors once we get them calibrated. Considering accuracy is not the primary purpose of these panels, the gaming monitors in our results database perform extremely well.

Gamma Response

Gamma is the measurement of luminance levels at every step in the brightness range from 0 to 100 percent. It's important because poor gamma can either crush detail at various points or wash it out, making the entire picture appear flat and dull. Correct gamma produces a more three-dimensional image, with a greater sense of depth and realism. Meanwhile, incorrect gamma can negatively affect image quality, even in monitors with high contrast ratios.

In the gamma charts below, the yellow line represents 2.2, which is the most widely used standard for television, film, and computer graphics production. The closer the white measurement trace comes to 2.2, the better.

Most displays have three or more gamma presets that represent the same tracking at different values (1.8, 2.0, 2.2, and so on). AOC's G2460PQU is different in that each preset renders a markedly different gamma response. I’ll show you all three so you can see what I mean.

Gamma 1 is the G2460PQU's default setting. It takes an unusual path in that the luminance errors become darker as brightness rises. Then the 90-percent level suddenly becomes too bright. In a game, tracking like this would manifest as crushed or reduced detail in the brighter portions of the image.

Gamma 2 is the best choice, whether you calibrate or not. It’s not perfect, but the slight aberrations at 10 and 90 percent represent 1.5 cd/m2 at most. That’s a negligible error.

If you’re hoping for a 2.4 power function or BT.1886 gamma result at the number 3 preset, you’re out of luck. The majority of the trace is much too dark. Even at a high backlight setting, gaming would be difficult thanks to a loss of detail. The image is just too murky at this preset.

Here is our comparison group again.

The G2460PQU is right in middle of the gamma range results. All of our test subjects demonstrate tight tracking, including the AOC. And none of them show a visible error.

We calculate gamma deviation by simply expressing the difference from 2.2 as a percentage.

The G2460PQU’s Gamma 2 preset tracks close to our standard of 2.2. In this chart, the top four finishers are particularly close, while the EA274WMi and XL2720Z are a little off the mark. If you want maximum detail in gaming titles, or any other application for that matter, accurate gamma is a must. AOC can deliver it.

Display all 40 comments.
  • 5 Hide
    PandaV4 , July 10, 2014 1:57 AM
    I have a AOC G2460P monitor myself, and a unpleasant surprise was that refresh rate of 144 Hz wasn't supported if using the DisplayPort connection. Does G2460PQU have the same limitations, or does it actually support 144 Hz over DisplayPort?
  • 7 Hide
    PandaV4 , July 10, 2014 2:15 AM
    After some googling it seems that G2460PQU and G2460P is the same model. So beware if you want to use Displayport you wont be able to use the 144 Hz setting too! And this doesn't have any blur reduction either! It seems there is actually a new updated model to be released this month the AOC G2460PG. And it has nvidia g-sync support and blur reduction, and supports 144 over dIsplayport.
    TL;DR: G2460PQU = DO NOT BUY, G2460PG = BUY.
  • 0 Hide
    ubercake , July 10, 2014 4:12 AM
    Good review. Thanks.

    A typo:
    Bezel width: 0.6-1 inched / 15-25 mm
  • 1 Hide
    ceberle , July 10, 2014 5:10 AM
    Quote:
    I have a AOC G2460P monitor myself, and a unpleasant surprise was that refresh rate of 144 Hz wasn't supported if using the DisplayPort connection. Does G2460PQU have the same limitations, or does it actually support 144 Hz over DisplayPort?


    The PQU does accept 144 Hz over DisplayPort.

    -Christian-
  • 3 Hide
    PandaV4 , July 10, 2014 5:24 AM
    Quote:
    Quote:
    I have a AOC G2460P monitor myself, and a unpleasant surprise was that refresh rate of 144 Hz wasn't supported if using the DisplayPort connection. Does G2460PQU have the same limitations, or does it actually support 144 Hz over DisplayPort?


    The PQU does accept 144 Hz over DisplayPort.

    -Christian-

    A bit of googling brought up this article - http://pcmonitors.info/reviews/aoc-g2460pqu which says: " The image provided by DisplayPort is very similar on this monitor and it should also support the maximum (144Hz) refresh rate. Unfortunately that was not the case during our testing" and "The PC resolutions below this should feature 1920 x 1080 with 100Hz, 120Hz and 144Hz selectable – but that isn’t the case.". It seems there are different revisions of this monitor with the same model number. So if you buy one of those than you are practically gambling about the 144 Hz support.
  • 0 Hide
    npyrhone , July 10, 2014 6:11 AM
    Will we ever see here a review of even one non-TN gaming monitor? The reduced color depth renders to image quality absolutely disgusting.

    I will be the first one to congratulate you when you publish the next review of a monitor with a non-TN panel working over 60Hz.
  • -1 Hide
    rantoc , July 10, 2014 7:05 AM
    Yet another low res 1080p panel - Yawn!
  • -3 Hide
    3Dns , July 10, 2014 7:12 AM
    I have that model too and i buy it after a HP 23xi IPS LED Panel.
    I understand that.
    It doesnt worth 300€ for this model. All you need is 60hz and 24" Panel that you can take it with 120€. For me IPS Panels offer you way better colors so for me its better. Now if you want it for a GTX780 and above and you wanna play over 60FPS it may worth.
    But have in mind that a normal monitor cost ~120$ and this model cost double. You can spend that money in other hardware areas like better GPU for example.
  • 5 Hide
    Adroid , July 10, 2014 7:30 AM
    Sorry, but I won't ever buy another 1080p "gaming" display. 1920x1200 is vastly superior for "gaming" screens, and it's a shame the industry has veered away from it.

    I guess the thought process involves "and you can watch HD movies on it". Needless to say the 16:9 ratio is cheaper for manufacturers, and it's a great sales pitch. Well, give me a break. I got suckered into that line of thinking and I probably watched 2-3 movies on my "gaming" 23 inch monitor in 4-5 years.

    Let's keep the movies where they belong in the living room and re-focus "gaming" screens where they should have never left - in the 16:10 aspect ratio.
  • 3 Hide
    alchemy69 , July 10, 2014 8:35 AM
    If a game isn't enjoyable at 60Hz it isn't going to be enjoyable at 144Hz. And if it is enjoyable at 144, it still will be at 60. I've had some of the greatest fun over the last 30 years playing on tiny monitors, at low resolution and probably less than 30fps. I don't need the industry telling me what I need to have fun just so they can move more product.
  • 3 Hide
    moogleslam , July 10, 2014 8:57 AM
    With G-Sync monitors coming out now, technology like this already seems obsolete. Looking forward to an ASUS ROG Swift review.
  • 1 Hide
    PandaV4 , July 10, 2014 9:00 AM
    As i said before the AOC G2460PG coming this month has G-sync support too. There really is no sense in buying the model in this review.
  • 2 Hide
    ubercake , July 10, 2014 9:31 AM
    Quote:
    With G-Sync monitors coming out now, technology like this already seems obsolete. Looking forward to an ASUS ROG Swift review.


    I kind of agree, but if you don't have a G-sync capable GPU or don't want to throw the required funds at a G-sync monitor, these 144Hz monitors are the best options for gaming and they're far less expensive than G-sync monitors.
  • 2 Hide
    Adroid , July 10, 2014 1:14 PM
    Well my dream monitor is a 1920x1200 24" AH-IPS with G-sync, no ghosting, and extremely fast response times. I would be willing to shell out extra money for something like this, but quite honestly manufacturers may never make one, ever.
  • 3 Hide
    ceberle , July 10, 2014 1:40 PM
    Quote:
    Will we ever see here a review of even one non-TN gaming monitor? The reduced color depth renders to image quality absolutely disgusting.

    I will be the first one to congratulate you when you publish the next review of a monitor with a non-TN panel working over 60Hz.


    Yes. I just finished up testing of the Overlord Tempest X270OC. The article will publish soon. I'm also expecting a sample of the Asus PG278Q in the next few weeks. Please stay tuned!

    -Christian-
  • 0 Hide
    larsoncc , July 10, 2014 1:55 PM
    Does this support any 3d emitters and/or 3D Vision? Or is this one high refresh only, and not 3D?
  • 1 Hide
    ceberle , July 10, 2014 2:26 PM
    Quote:
    Does this support any 3d emitters and/or 3D Vision? Or is this one high refresh only, and not 3D?


    3D is not supported.

    -Christian-
  • 1 Hide
    JackNaylorPE , July 10, 2014 3:25 PM
    B to W ? No G to G ??????


    Quote:
    Well my dream monitor is a 1920x1200 24" AH-IPS with G-sync, no ghosting, and extremely fast response times. I would be willing to shell out extra money for something like this, but quite honestly manufacturers may never make one, ever.


    That should arrive right after the car that does 0 to 60 in 3.6 seconds, carries 9 people, gets 87 miles per gallon and is priced at $17,995 :) 
  • 1 Hide
    wtfxxxgp , July 11, 2014 12:51 AM
    I don't understand why people are complaining about "yet another 1080p TN monitor". This is still the more mainstream option for the greater majority of people out there. Toms has done a really good job of letting us know where it stands in comparison against its competitors. If it's not for you, then what is the point of bashing either THW or the manufacturer of the model that has been reviewed? Then sit back and wait for the review of the monitor that will eventually get your nod of approval, because I'll tell you right now - what most of you are "waiting for" will be DAMN EXPENSIVE.
  • 0 Hide
    Transsive , July 11, 2014 3:48 AM
    I love motion blur reduction (CRT-like strobbing). I have a lightboost2 monitor.
    But I hate the requirement of running 120fps at 120hz.
    Get any less than 120fps and the quality drops pretty noticeably (stuttering, double images). To the point where I prefer playing games like Civ 5 without motion blur reduction/strobbing.

    But G-Sync should remove the 120/144fps requirement, so I'm quite excited about that.
    Right now TN panels is where gaming is at, but hopefully not for much longer. I value motion clarity more than color accuracy and viewing angles.
Display more comments
React To This Article