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Overclocking the E2160 Processor to 3 GHz

GPU vs. CPU Upgrade: Extensive Tests
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The E2160 has even more potential; further clocking it to 3 GHz should show whether or not the CPU is able to compete with the more expensive models. Here, the clock rate of 3000 MHz and the larger caches of the E6750 or Q6600 come into direct contrast. For comparison purposes, the faster Geforce 8800 GTS 512 OC has been used as the test graphics card.

Important! Overclocking components will result in a loss of warranty and an increase in temperatures. The standard cooler may not be able to compensate, so a Zalman 9700 LED was used in this test. When attempting to overclock, you should always monitor temperatures carefully.

Crysis v1.2 1280x1024
0xAA, Trilinear High Quality
1680x1050
0xAA, Trilinear
High Quality
1920x1200
0xAA, Trilinear
High Quality
1280x1024 0xAA, Trilinear
Very High Quality
Total value
n fps
Percent
8800 GTS OC (512 MB) E2160@1.8 23.0 20.5 19.8 17.3 80.6 100.0
8800 GTS OC (512 MB) E2160@2.41 29.8 26.2 24.2 20.9 101.1 125.4
8800 GTS OC (512 MB) E2160@3.0 34.8 30.1 25.8 22.5 113.2 140.4
8800 GTS OC (512 MB) E6750@2.67 34.7 28.8 24.6 24.5 112.6 139.7
8800 GTS OC (512 MB) Q6600@3.2 36.6 30.2 24.8 24.4 116.0 143.9
8800 GTS OC (512 MB) X6800EE@2.94 39.0 31.4 26.0 22.7 119.1 147.8

In Crysis, the E2160 at 3 GHz is able to catch up with the E6750 at 2.67 GHz (standard clock rate). The jump in performance from 2400 to 3000 MHz represents an additional gain of 15%. If you assume an E2160 standard clocking rate of 1800 MHz, this is a total of 40% more overall power that the graphics card is able to transfer to the screen. There is a gap of 4% and 8% compared to the Q6600 at 3200 MHz and the X6800EE, respectively. The expensive Extreme Edition appears to be favored by Crysis.

World in Conflict 1.05 1280x1024
0xAA, Trilinear
Very High Quality
1680x1050
0xAA, Trilinear
Very High Quality
1920x1200
0xAA, Trilinear
Very High Quality
Total value
in fps
Percent
8800 GTS OC (512 MB) E2160@1.8 18.0 21.0 20.0 59.0 100.0
8800 GTS OC (512 MB) E2160@2.41 31.0 31.0 30.0 92.0 155.9
8800 GTS OC (512 MB) E2160@3.0 40.0 38.0 37.0 115.0 194.9
8800 GTS OC (512 MB) E6750@2.67 42.0 41.0 38.0 121.0 205.1
8800 GTS OC (512 MB) Q6600@3.2 47.0 44.0 39.0 130.0 220.3
8800 GTS OC (512 MB) X6800EE@2.94 43.0 41.0 37.0 121.0 205.1

World in Conflict responds to raw clocking rates without antialiasing: overclocking from 1800 to 3000 MHz enables the E2160 to almost double overall performance. There is very little difference between this and the more expensive CPU models—the Q6600 OC at 3200 MHz provides the best results.

World in Conflict 1.05 1280x1024
4xAA, 4xAF
Very High Quality
1680x1050
4xAA, 4xAF
Very High Quality
1920x1200
4xAA, 4xAF
Very High Quality
Total value
in fps
Percent
8800 GTS OC (512 MB) E2160@1.8 19.0 18.0 18.0 55.0 100.0
8800 GTS OC (512 MB) E2160@2.41 28.0 27.0 22.0 77.0 140.0
8800 GTS OC (512 MB) E2160@3.0 33.0 28.0 25.0 86.0 156.4
8800 GTS OC (512 MB) E6750@2.67 34.0 28.0 24.0 86.0 156.4
8800 GTS OC (512 MB) Q6600@3.2 36.0 30.0 23.0 89.0 161.8
8800 GTS OC (512 MB) X6800EE@2.94 34.0 29.0 25.0 88.0 160.0

When using antialiasing, 2400 MHz is the basic level, the additional performance gain of up to 3000 MHz is lower. The graphics card appears to be the limiting factor. The gaps between the CPUs have become smaller: the Geforce 8800 GTS 512 OC with the E2160 at 3 GHz comes close to the level of a E6750 processor, which is almost three times the price.

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