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Test Platform

Mobile CPU Chart Update and Forecast
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Motherboard: Kontron KT690/mITX

amd mobile processor

This is an interesting motherboard, because the brand is not very well known among enthusiasts and end users, and also because it is a highly integrated piece of technology that is geared for small-form-factor, low-power, high-performance PCs.

On the Kontron Website you’ll find the product when you look for embedded motherboards in MiniITX format. The KT690/mITX is based on AMD’s M690T chipset and the SB600 Southbridge. They are not high-performance components, but offer all features for a full-blown PC, and they’re optimized for mobile use; hence they are power efficient. The offering includes an ATI Radeon X1250 graphics controller with both a D-SUB and a DVI display output and even an x8 PCI Express slot, which you can either use for a graphics card or any other add-on card such as a storage controller. An S-video output can be added as an option and we found a 32-bit PCI slot for legacy components.

As we found out in our PCI Express Scaling Analysis, the x8 bandwidth still is good enough to run our benchmarks, although x16 would have provided slightly better results.

We liked the fact that this board is based on a conventional AMD socket S1 for mobile processors, which is why we could run the Turion 64 X2 family. Memory is added via two 200-pin DDR2 SO-DIMM sockets, which will accept modules at up to 8 GB capacity according to the data sheet. Regardless of the small MiniITX dimensions (17x17 cm or 6.67’), Kontron accommodated six USB 2.0 ports in the backplane and four more on the motherboard. The back panel comes with PS/2 keyboard and mouse ports, a simple HD audio sound system and two Gigabit Ethernet ports, which are based on Realtek RTL8111B controllers.

Four SATA/300 ports and an UltraATA/133 channel are more than enough to hook up storage devices. Since this motherboard was designed for industrial markets (Kontron emphasized long-term availability), it also comes with a CompactFlash connector. This allows users to run the operating system off a CompactFlash memory card. Looking at CompactFlash prices, a 4-GB card will be sufficient to hold a Linux distro and is amazingly affordable.

The little board even comes with a TPM unit (Trusted Platform Module), GPIO and hardware monitoring and two serial ports. The only features missing are overclocking options, which are, of course, almost always unnecessary for industrial applications.

amd mobile processor

amd mobile processor

amd mobile processor

amd mobile processor

amd mobile processor

Kontron utilizes the SB600 Southbridge, which provides a basic set of interfaces.

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  • 1 Hide
    weinheimer , May 22, 2008 2:16 PM
    So if this is an updated mobile cpu chart, where are the T8100's T9300's?

    45nm is the way to go on laptops
  • 1 Hide
    drfelip , May 22, 2008 4:41 PM
    I also miss some processor in the T5000 series, because they are very common in low-end laptops. Good work anyway!
  • 1 Hide
    jcwbnimble , May 22, 2008 5:10 PM
    I too am very dissapointed that your mobile CPU chart doesn't inlcude the T5000 series of processors from Intel. I realize that everyone wants to see the "high end", but some of want to compare it to the low end as well.

    I just purchased an HP 17" laptop and was trying to find some data on the T5000 processors because that is what comes stock on the model I purchased. I wanted to see if it was really worth it to spend the extra ~$200 to upgrade to the T9000 processors. I had to look elsewhere to get that kind of comparrison.

    To bad for Toms' sites, I found another reputable site that I will now use as a reference tool. Shame on Tom's for not covering the mid and low range products.
  • 0 Hide
    lightbody , May 22, 2008 8:39 PM
    65nm Turion X2's support DDR2-800. Why wasn't this speed used instead of DDR2-667?
  • 0 Hide
    eltouristo , May 23, 2008 3:59 AM
    toms you are no1 but you need more laptop cpu and gpu charting.
  • 0 Hide
    nihility , May 25, 2008 3:14 PM
    Wow, I knew my TL-60 was pathetic but I never realized just how much :( 
    I like the charts, I like the interactivity and I love that we can compare mobile and desktop CPUs. I just wish mine didn't rank so low.
  • 0 Hide
    crantech , May 28, 2008 5:23 PM
    Copying an earlier comment, these charts need many more chips on them. I just bought an otherwise screaming laptop with an 8800M GTS GPU but only T5550 CPU, and want to know how much improvement I'd get moving up to a T8xxx or T9xxx.

    Plus in general I miss how the charts used to allow highlighting of specific processors for easier comparison.
  • 0 Hide
    weinheimer , May 28, 2008 6:05 PM
    Tom's used to be number 1. They are jut OK now. If you don't know more than the authors and are not able to independently screen the information you can't trust the data or conclusions at Tom's anymore
  • 0 Hide
    carl0ski , June 1, 2008 7:26 AM
    crantechCopying an earlier comment, these charts need many more chips on them. I just bought an otherwise screaming laptop with an 8800M GTS GPU but only T5550 CPU, and want to know how much improvement I'd get moving up to a T8xxx or T9xxx.Plus in general I miss how the charts used to allow highlighting of specific processors for easier comparison.


    That's a bit pointless why review lots when the few they have are done poorly anyway.

    Whats the point of adding these benchmarks without demonstrating that your Notebook battery will last - less, more or the same between models/price/performance.

    Tom's grab a load meter and find the DC power load of each of these processors on your Solar Power equipment (direct DC input not AC PSU, to emulated a Notebook Battery).
    1. record peak and typical power in "each & every" application/benchmark
    2. record power consumption at system IDLE