Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in

Benchmark Results: Integrated Gaming

Move Over G45: Nvidia's GeForce 9300 Arrives
By

Nvidia’s bars look long, strong, and down to get the friction on, but even at 800x600, you’re still only getting 18 frames per second using Medium detail settings. Sure, you could turn things down further. If you’re going to game though, there’s no point in sacrificing the entire experience. AMD’s 790GX isn’t far off, but it is bested by the GeForce 9300. And Intel’s G45 just does not have the chops to compete here. Moreover, numerous graphical errors keep it from qualifying even if it were faster.

At 800x600, the GeForce 9300 could be considered playable, though 1024x768 and 1280x1024 are out of the question. AMD picks up another second-place finish and Intel brings up the rear yet again.

Same pecking order as before. The GeForce 9300 takes first with hardly-playable performance, AMD comes in second with less-playable performance, and Intel take third with unplayable performance (along with a hint of flashing textures—just imagine if we had turned on DirectX 10 rendering!)

This one won’t run at 800x600, so we suffered through 120 seconds of slide shows on all three platforms. Supreme Commander reacts well to both powerful graphics solutions and quick, threaded processors. Our mainstream configurations are endowed with respectable dual-core CPUs, but combined with integrated graphics, the result isn’t pretty.

Now you’re probably thinking to yourself that none of these tests are anything anyone would try playing Crysis, Unreal Tournament, or World in Conflict on an integrated graphics processor. However, that’s exactly what Nvidia tried to convince us of with this chart:

Interestingly, Nvidia also achieved its numbers with an E7200 and 4GB of DDR2-800. The difference is that, in a game like Crysis, you need to turn absolutely every setting down to low in order to hit those playable numbers. Yes, it’s feasible, but do yourself a favor and pick up a sub-$100 video card instead.

Now, let’s see what these same configurations are able to do with the benefit of an SLI- or CrossFire-ish technology applied to them.

React To This Article