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Intel Launches Ereader for the Blind

The Reader is, of course, Atom-powered and while at first glance it looks a lot like an ereader, it's not your average Kindle copycat. The device combines Intel's Atom processor with with a 5mp camera. The camera captures an image of the printed text and the Reader then converts it into a digital format, which it plays back to the user in a "lifelike" male or female voice. It can also display with different levels of magnification on the device's 4.3-inch 16:9 LCD.

The Reader boasts a 4GB Intel SSD, as well as USB and mini USB support, weighs 1.38 lbs. With a fully charged battery, it can play over 4 hours of text-to-speech or .mp3 audio, capture and process over 85 images of text or remain in standby for up to 5 days. It also comes with the option for purchasing the Portable Capture Station, which aids users in capturing large amounts of text, such as a chapter or an entire book

Available in the US through select resellers, the device comes with a hefty price tag. Don Johnston is selling it for $1,499 and the capture station will cost you an extra $399.

More here if you're interested.

  • ubernoobie
    this shows love for the blind but how will they know which buttons are which in the first place?
    Reply
  • matt87_50
    that sounds awesome! until we get to the price....
    Reply
  • winner4455
    matt87_50that sounds awesome! until we get to the price....
    "Don Johnston is selling it for $1,499 and the capture station will cost you an extra $399."
    Reply
  • akhodjaev
    Is it a toy or necessity item? is it covered thru insurance? I am not sure who can afford this....
    Reply
  • dhowie
    haha i dont want to be mean, but how can a blind person read the menus and use the buttons, how do they update it? dont tell me they have to hook it up to a pc lol
    Reply
  • superblahman123
    The Reader is, of course, Atom-powered and while at first glance it looks a lot like an ereader, it's not your average Kindle copycat.
    Don Johnston is selling it for $1,499 and the capture station will cost you an extra $399.

    You're right, this isn't a Kindle at all.
    Reply
  • magicandy
    Misleading article title. Legally blind would have been correct. This doesn't use braille....
    Reply
  • Camikazi
    ubernoobiethis shows love for the blind but how will they know which buttons are which in the first place?Like most everything else, they get taught, they remember and they use the device. I can use most of my devices by feel alone without having to look at it.
    Reply
  • the_krasno
    ubernoobiethis shows love for the blind but how will they know which buttons are which in the first place?
    Ever heard of braille?
    Reply
  • Khimera2000
    ermmm.... they point the camera... and take a shot... so if there blind how do they know where to point??? is there a voice prompt??? "a little to the left... no your other left... stop... up......" there is a station for helping with converting chapters, however i don't see the blind buying alot of non brail books, i beleve there's a much more cheaper version called an audio book although navigating that library is an entirely different undaertaking... o ya one more question how would they know if it freezes or just runs out of batteries?

    Reply