AMD Rumored to Phase Out Vision Branding

A rumor suggests that AMD has decided to kick its "VISION" brand to the curb. SemiAccurate reports that the flashy name has disappeared from its product logos. Vision, of course, was preceded by "Better By Design", which was AMD's first effort to tell consumers that a compute platform needs to be balanced and consist of a powerful CPU and a powerful GPU.

And, of course, some readers may remember AMD Live, which was somewhat similar to Intel's Viiv, but did not live long enough for consumers to understand what it really was.

Given AMD's renewed focus on the consumer market, it is a good idea to remove the clutter and simplify its product naming. Now if we only could get rid of those stale sequence numbers...

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  • Fulgurant
    kawininjazxAMD has a big problem right now with their mobile processors. The junk they sell now like the E-1400 and the "AMD Dual-Core" processors give such horrible performance. The only decent running CPUs they have are the A6,8,10 series APUs. It seems like their CPUs get slower every year, I don't know how that's possible.


    Unless you're trying to be sarcastic, your comment is hopelessly self-contradictory. AMD sucks at mobile processors, except for their Llano/Trinity line of APUs, which promise to revolutionize laptop graphics' performance? Granted, there's still work to be done, but it seems clear to me that AMD's doing the most exciting thing in recent memory for prospective laptop consumers.

    On the CPU side, yeah, AMD's behind. That's more a desktop than a mobile problem though, going forward. Whatever AMD loses on the (x86) CPU side in the mobile space is more than made up by its gains in the integrated graphics' space. Now they just have to keep improving performance and power efficiency.
  • azraa
    digiexAMD simply lacks vision.

    Please tell me how APUs and modular cpu architectures are not great developments, and, in the future, probably going be even better?
    The major problem AMD faces is that software nowadays is not written to be efficient with modules, which, again, may very well be solved in a few years. If you look at them right now, I guess they do lack vision, but in the short term, 'vision' loses its significance.
  • vaughn2k
    They should put more meaning with their branding, and should live to its commitment...
  • Other Comments
  • vaughn2k
    They should put more meaning with their branding, and should live to its commitment...
  • kawininjazx
    AMD has a big problem right now with their mobile processors. The junk they sell now like the E-1400 and the "AMD Dual-Core" processors give such horrible performance. The only decent running CPUs they have are the A6,8,10 series APUs. It seems like their CPUs get slower every year, I don't know how that's possible.
  • Fulgurant
    kawininjazxAMD has a big problem right now with their mobile processors. The junk they sell now like the E-1400 and the "AMD Dual-Core" processors give such horrible performance. The only decent running CPUs they have are the A6,8,10 series APUs. It seems like their CPUs get slower every year, I don't know how that's possible.


    Unless you're trying to be sarcastic, your comment is hopelessly self-contradictory. AMD sucks at mobile processors, except for their Llano/Trinity line of APUs, which promise to revolutionize laptop graphics' performance? Granted, there's still work to be done, but it seems clear to me that AMD's doing the most exciting thing in recent memory for prospective laptop consumers.

    On the CPU side, yeah, AMD's behind. That's more a desktop than a mobile problem though, going forward. Whatever AMD loses on the (x86) CPU side in the mobile space is more than made up by its gains in the integrated graphics' space. Now they just have to keep improving performance and power efficiency.