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CyberpowerPC Debuts Zeus Mini SFF Series

CyberpowerPC has launched a new line of small form factor PCs, the Zeus Mini desktop series. Customers looking for a lot of stomp in a small footprint can choose between three AMD "Kavari" A-Series processor models, or six Intel "Haswell" models. Pricing starts at $599 USD.

According to the company, all Zeus Mini models sport three standard USB 3.0 ports (two are in the front), HDMI 1.4 output for gaming on large screens, and a high-definition audio port, which includes digital S/PDIF.  They also support Wireless AC and Bluetooth 4.0 connectivity.

The specs also reveal that the chassis measures just 4.4 x 17.4 x 13 inches. Despite the small size, the internal components are easily swappable and upgradable thanks to a design that allows for standard PC components. Nope, there's no pretend console going on here.

"All CyberpowerPC systems are assembled and supported in the USA," reads the company's announcement. "Every system is meticulously built including precise cable routing to ensure optimal airflow and a clean aesthetic appearance. CyberpowerPC loads every system with Microsoft Windows 8.1 for an enhanced gaming and multimedia experience."

On the AMD front, the Zeus Mini-A 300 has a starting price of $1,079, and features the A10-7850K APU, an AMD R9 290 graphics card (4 GB), 16 GB of memory (8 GB x 2), a 2 TB hard drive (SATA 3), and an 8x slim DVD-RW. If the price is too steep, customers can also customize and purchase the Zeus Mini-A 200 with a starting price of $679, and the Zeus Mini-A 100 with a starting price of $599.

For the Intel fans, the Zeus Mini-I 780 is the most expensive of the series with a starting price of $1,479. This model comes packed with the Intel i7-4770K CPU, a Nvidia GTX 780 (3 GB) video card, 16 GB of RAM (8 GB x2), a 2 TB hard drive (SATA 3), and an 8x Slim DVD-RW drive. There are four other Intel models spanning in price from $659 to $1,099.

"The Zeus Mini more than doubles the cooling performance over standard SFF gaming systems with its ability to install 240mm liquid cooling solutions," reads the company's press release. "The extra cooling support ensures maximum performance and minimal heat and noise."

For more information about the new Zeus Mini series, head here.

  • WarWolverineWarrior
    That's cool but overpriced.
    Reply
  • ocilfa
    Maybe I'm wrong, but doesn't the new Kaveri cpu's have the ability to xfire with any r7 or r9 cards?
    Reply
  • J_E_D_70
    Don't think it's overpriced at all. The homebuilt in my sig cost $1,300 in mid-2012 with almost every component on sale. The CyberPowerPC machine has a HT processor, twice the ram, a much more capable GPU, a warranty, and someone else gets to pack everything into that case - for $179. How's that not a good deal if you don't want to build your own?
    Reply
  • WarWolverineWarrior
    -$80 for OS cuz no one buys OS.
    Also it eliminates options for Xfire or SLI.
    Also small boxes cause heat problems.

    If companies get discounts on things that they buy in bulk, why does it cost more than if I was to build it myself?
    I think the goal of all PC selling companies should to discourage you from building your own cuz they can do it cheaper.

    If someone with money did that, they'd have all the other PC companies by the balls.
    Reply
  • DarkSable
    12563620 said:
    -$80 for OS cuz no one buys OS.
    Also it eliminates options for Xfire or SLI.
    Also small boxes cause heat problems.

    If companies get discounts on things that they buy in bulk, why does it cost more than if I was to build it myself?
    I think the goal of all PC selling companies should to discourage you from building your own cuz they can do it cheaper.

    If someone with money did that, they'd have all the other PC companies by the balls.

    It does eliminate dual-card setups, but a lot of us would rather have a single more powerful card anyways.

    Small boxes absolutely do not cause heat problems if they're designed correctly - trust me, with more than eight years specializing in small form factor rigs, it's not an issue if it's done right.

    Reply
  • tinmann
    It's not a water cooling friendly design at all. It has placement for four fans in the top but no room for a 480mm radiator. And the 140mm CPU radiator is poorly placed. I hope there is a vented side panel that just hasn't been pictured. And most modern PSU's have bottom or top mounted fans, where is the PSU supposed to vent out hot air? I'm heavily leaning towards fail on this design.
    Reply
  • maza90210
    I hate it when they put together these high end PC and put a shitty cx500 PSU, everyone knows that the power supply is the most important part of a PC, so why cheap out?
    Reply
  • RaduZ
    I hate it when they put together these high end PC and put a shitty cx500 PSU, everyone knows that the power supply is the most important part of a PC, so why cheap out?
    That PSU is not that bad, there is a review on this site and it shows that it has a verry nice output. Also i belive they will have other PSU's too because it's hard to belive that they will put the A10 and the R9 290 and expect a 500W power supply to power them (which i think it can but it's not a good idea)
    Reply
  • maza90210
    It's just that it's a premium PC, with a high price tag, you'd at least expect a premium power supply, with at least gold efficiency
    Reply
  • lsorice
    I just want to be able to purchase that case. Preferably without all those LEDs. That would solve my HTPC/Steam box issues. I can just put all my hardware from last year in there and have a nice machine that could handle 1080p that fits nicely on my tv stand. Excited for the future of small form factor PCs with full sized hardware.
    Reply