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Nvidia's New GK210 GPU Powers Dual-GPU Tesla K80 For Accelerated Computing

While the new Maxwell architecture leads the company's gaming portfolio, Nvidia has re-spinned the previous-generation Kepler GPU in order to produce the GK210 that powers the new Tesla K80 card for GPGPU accelerated computing applications.


The new GK210 is a modified version of the GK110B found in the Tesla K40, but with doubled-up register file and shared memory cache. The goal is to give applications more resources to enable more registers per thread without compromising the total number of threads that an SMX can process, reducing latencies and improving efficiency.

Tesla K80Tesla K40GeForce GTXTitan-Z
GPUGK210GK110BGK110B
CUDA Cores4,992(2 x 2,496)2,8805,760(2 x 2880)
Nominal/Boost Core Clock562/875 MHz745/875 MHz705/876 MHz
Memory Clock1250 MHz GDDR51500 MHz GDDR51750 MHz GDDR5
Memory bus384-bit384-bit384-bit
Memory Bandwidth240 GB/s x2288 GB/s336 GB/s x2
Memory Amount24 GB (2 x 12 GB)12 GB12 GB (2 x 6 GB)
Single Precision FP perf.8.74 Tflops4.29 Tflops8 Tflops
Double Precision FP. perf.2.91 Tflops1.43 Tflops2.6 Tflops
TDP300 W235 W375 W
Coolingpassivepassiveactive

Note that the GK210 processors in the K80 have two of their 15 SMX blocks disabled, limiting the card to 4,992 CUDA cores (2,496 per GPU). This might not look as impressive as the Titan-Z, but keep in mind that the Tesla K80 is passively-cooled, with a tighter focus on performance-per-watt and limited at a 300 Watt TDP.


Of course, the Tesla K80 has other tricks up its sleeve, like an astonishing 24 GB of total graphics memory onboard, or 12 GB per GPU. At 5 GHz effective over a 384-bit memory interface, the GDDR5 RAM provides an aggregate 480 GB/s of bandwidth (240 GB/s per GPU). It's highly doubtful that we'll see a GeForce card ever carry the GK210, but when we asked, the company didn't rule out the possibility of a future Titan card powered by this graphics processor.

With two GPUs, it's no surprise that performance is significantly higher than that of the single GPU-equipped Tesla K40 card released last year. The Tesla K80 is available now for "high-performance computing, computational science, supercomputing, enterprise, complex data analytics and machine learning applications", according to Nvidia. The card has no MSRP, as the company let us know that OEMs set the price, but we can expect it to be significantly more expensive than the Tesla K40 12GB card that currently ranges between $3800 and $6400 on Amazon.com.

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  • razor512
    Can these cards be overclocked?
    Reply
  • Nuckles_56
    Can these cards be overclocked?
    They probably can be a little bit but the fact that they are passively cooled will make it very difficult to get much of an advantage out of doing so
    Reply
  • Thaisnang
    Still not enough to run Unity and WatchDogs smoothly.
    Reply
  • gallovfc
    Still, my GTX 970 SLI setup runs Crysis 3 better than that K80 and Titan-Z... =)
    Reply
  • gallovfc
    Can I use this silent card on my HTPC ? lol
    Reply
  • lordmogul
    14610464 said:
    Can these cards be overclocked?
    I doubt any overclocking software will detect this card correctly anyway.
    14611314 said:
    Still not enough to run Unity and WatchDogs smoothly.
    Since it is not meant for gaming, this is not difficult.
    14618399 said:
    Still, my GTX 970 SLI setup runs Crysis 3 better than that K80 and Titan-Z... =)
    But this K80 is more than 13 times more powerful in double precision calculations than a 970 SLI setup.
    Reply
  • gallovfc
    This was the joke! =)
    That I don't want these cards because they don't run Crysis !! =D
    Reply
  • The3monitors
    How would it do in a renderfarm? I would like to see stats on the diff between this and a firegl.
    Reply