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Nvidia Announces Quadro M6000 Graphics Card With GM200 Maxwell GPU

Nvidia just announced its new GTX Titan X (our full review here), but it's not done with exciting announcements for the week yet. Today, the company is announcing the Quadro M6000 GPU, which is the workstation graphics card aimed at digital content creators who use the same GM200 GPU as the GTX Titan X.

We have a full review of the Nvidia Quadro M6000 on our sister site, Tom's IT Pro.

In fact, the card itself is largely identical to the GTX Titan X. It carries the same GPU with 3072 CUDA cores, packs 12 GB of GDDR5 memory which runs over a 384-bit memory interface, and has a peak SP performance of 7 TFlops and peak DP performance of 0.2 TFlops. The Maxwell GPU's clock speed is a little different, with this one running at 988 MHz and boosting at up to 1114 MHz if the thermal headroom is available.

Physically, the card also closely resembles the GTX Titan X. It's got the same basic design for the cooler, but this one comes with a backplate and a different color scheme, and the power connector is placed at the back of the card rather than on the side.

The backplate of the card is especially interesting, as it has a small part above the drum fan area that you can remove. This is because the backplate makes it thicker, and by removing it, the card installed above it won't be quite as suffocated for air (assuming you have more than one card in your system).

Display outputs on the card consist of four DisplayPort 1.2 interfaces and a single DVI-I port. There's no HDMI here, mainly because it would limit the card's capabilities of driving many high-resolution displays.

You can get the full review here.

Follow Niels Broekhuijsen @NBroekhuijsen. Follow us @tomshardware, on Facebook and on Google+.

  • scook9
    Why cant we get more high-end consumer cards with rear (front?) facing power connectors? This would be a boon to small form factor boxes as well as slimmer HTPC builds.
    Reply
  • Blazer1985
    0.2Tflops FP64? Is Nvidia kidding with this quadro?
    That's an awesome card for viewport performance but of no use in compute intensive tasks.
    Reply
  • ohim
    The day when AMD/Nvidia will stop selling gaming GPUs with modified drivers at insane prices for professionals, it will be a good day !

    Though Quadro/FirePro GPUs have some extra components, most of the card is just a gaming GPU with different drivers ..
    Reply
  • doron
    The day when AMD/Nvidia will stop selling gaming GPUs with modified drivers at insane prices for professionals, it will be a good day !

    Though Quadro/FirePro GPUs have some extra components, most of the card is just a gaming GPU with different drivers ..

    The majority of the money you pay for any chip, and almost any product, goes towards R&D and marketing.
    Professional-grade gpus require extra man-power in drivers and support, and address a smaller market, which is probably the main reason for such price different.
    Reply
  • Colinmb123
    0.2Tflops FP64? Is Nvidia kidding with this quadro?
    That's an awesome card for viewport performance but of no use in compute intensive tasks.
    Actually any program that is able to use Nvidia's HPC features can take advantage of it. We use the CUDA cores from a couple of Quardo K5000s for Ansys and Fluent to accelerate our solvers.
    Reply
  • Eximo
    Support being the key there. If I am a professional at a company with a pile of Quadro and Tesla cards, I can call up Nvidia and have them fix an issue I am having, or work directly with other software vendors to fix their code. Can't get that kind of support for gaming.
    Reply
  • Blazer1985
    0.2Tflops FP64? Is Nvidia kidding with this quadro?
    That's an awesome card for viewport performance but of no use in compute intensive tasks.
    Actually any program that is able to use Nvidia's HPC features can take advantage of it. We use the CUDA cores from a couple of Quardo K5000s for Ansys and Fluent to accelerate our solvers.
    You surely can but if your solver uses FP64 operations (and many, many do) you will be getting only 0.2Tflops against 1.3Tflops of current generation Quadro K5000 or Titan Black.
    Looks like a deal breaker to me :-)
    Reply
  • Colinmb123
    0.2Tflops FP64? Is Nvidia kidding with this quadro?
    That's an awesome card for viewport performance but of no use in compute intensive tasks.
    Actually any program that is able to use Nvidia's HPC features can take advantage of it. We use the CUDA cores from a couple of Quardo K5000s for Ansys and Fluent to accelerate our solvers.
    You surely can but if your solver uses FP64 operations (and many, many do) you will be getting only 0.2Tflops against 1.3Tflops of current generation Quadro K5000 or Titan Black.
    Looks like a deal breaker to me :-)
    Wow. Just noticed that huge drop. Misread it originally. What they heck happened?
    Reply
  • Colinmb123
    Wow. Just noticed that huge drop. Misread it originally. What they heck happened?
    Never mind. Found out that Nvidia doesn't want to waste the space to implement a 1/3 or 1/2 fp32 capable fp64 section. UGH. That sucks.
    Reply
  • dragonsqrrl
    0.2Tflops FP64? Is Nvidia kidding with this quadro?
    That's an awesome card for viewport performance but of no use in compute intensive tasks.
    It will limit the market for this particular card, but you know there are plenty of "compute intensive" applications for fp32 performance in science, rendering, etc. Rendering in particular, those that rely on visualization such as in the film, game, or animation industries will be unaffected by the lack of double precision performance.
    Reply